How does the Marconi Wireless equipment work?!

Cam Houseman

Cam Houseman

Member
Hi!
A question I have is, how does everything in the Marconi Room, work? The purpose of each equipment? What is the purpose of the Silent Room?

I know some stuff, like the Panel with the handles, they cranked the power up when Titanic was losing power. But how does it work? Jack Phillips and Harold Bride, did they have shifts? Did Bride ever get to use it?

What's the name of the "Tappy thing" that they send out the signals with? How does that work?

What is the AC/DC (not the band ;) ) panel?

Wish Parks was here. I bet he'd engage this question with enthusiasm and blow my mind lol

thank you!
 
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Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
Hi!
A question I have is, how does everything in the Marconi Room, work? The purpose of each equipment? What is the purpose of the Silent Room?

I know some stuff, like the Panel with the handles, they cranked the power up when Titanic was losing power. But how does it work? Jack Phillips and Harold Bride, did they have shifts? Did Bride ever get to use it?

What's the name of the "Tappy thing" that they send out the signals with? How does that work?

What is the AC/DC (not the band ;) ) panel?

Wish Parks was here. I bet he'd engage this question with enthusiasm and blow my mind lol

thank you!
It works pretty good.
 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
I just read here in this science museum article that those Marconi wireless operators heard all the messages in the same frequency, which is why they were annoyed when ice warnings interrupted their seemingly important work of relaying the passengers' messages. I knew that the messages were written down by them, but I didn't have a clear picture in my mind of how they received them. For example,

"Since Titanic's wireless operators were transmitting over the same frequency as other ships, and the channels were jammed with passenger communications, several ice warnings from other vessels were either missed or ignored."

As sad as it is that this set-up didn't prevent the shipwreck, at least it was thanks to the Marconi device that they got a hold of the Carpathia. Otherwise, even the survivors on the lifeboats wouldn't have made it. :( And good thing they improved the system after that, so it worked better and they got their priorities straight. :)

"WHAT WAS THE IMPACT FOR RADIO COMMUNICATION?​

Hard lessons were learned from the disaster.
Soon afterwards, the International Radiographic Conference in London passed new regulations for wireless communication on board ship.
Perhaps the most important of these were that first-class passenger ships had to set a permanent 24-hour radio watch, use the same wavelength to transmit signals and maintain radio silence at regular intervals to listen for distress calls."

This explains a lot more:

 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
I just read here in this science museum article that those Marconi wireless operators heard all the messages in the same frequency, which is why they were annoyed when ice warnings interrupted their seemingly important work of relaying the passengers' messages. I knew that the messages were written down by them, but I didn't have a clear picture in my mind of how they received them. For example,



As sad as it is that this set-up didn't prevent the shipwreck, at least it was thanks to the Marconi device that they got a hold of the Carpathia. Otherwise, even the survivors on the lifeboats wouldn't have made it. :( And good thing they improved the system after that, so it worked better and they got their priorities straight. :)





This explains a lot more:

 
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M.A.S.

M.A.S.

3rd class
Member
Wow! :O All that mechanical engineering stuff went over my head (but I did read every sentence). Very fascinating. Wish there were more illustrations... I was struggling to visualize everything. And wow, too, about the "way back" references -- all from around that time.
 
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