How Far South did the Titanic Reach?

Mar 22, 2003
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>>However these rules were to be followed under normal circumstances but at the time, circumstances were anything but normal. Additionally, you may or may not know it but Company Rules were enforced at the master's discretion. We have proof of that from the evidence of Lookout Fleet:<<

Then you quote what Fleet told Sen. Burton who reminded Fleet: "You said you did not believe that they struck seven bells, and then you said it was just after." to which Fleet responded, "It may have been just after. We never, generally, ring bells up in the crow's nest every half hour; we generally miss it."

And you believe him? Let me point out that all of this had to do with the real question that Sen. Smith was asking, which was:

Senator SMITH. When did you report that [a black mass]?
Mr. FLEET. I could not tell you the time.
Senator SMITH. About what time?
Mr. FLEET. Just after seven bells
.

and then when Smith wanted him to be more specific,

Senator SMITH. How long before the collision or accident did you report ice ahead?
Mr. FLEET. I have no idea.


which was followed by this exchange:

Senator SMITH. Would you be willing to say that you reported the presence of this iceberg an hour before the collision?
Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. Forty-five minutes?
Mr. FLEET. No. sir.
Senator SMITH. A half hour before?
Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. Fifteen minutes before?
Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. Ten minutes before?
Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. How far away was this black mass when you first saw it?
Mr. FLEET. I have no idea, sir.

That is what later prompted Sen. Burton to say:

Senator BURTON. You saw this, then, before or just after seven bells?
Mr. FLEET. Yes, sir.
Senator BURTON. Was it just before or just after?
Mr. FLEET. I do not think we struck seven bells. I believe it was just after seven bells.
Senator BURTON. You said you did not believe that they struck seven bells, and then you said it was just after.
Mr. FLEET. It may have been just after. We never, generally, ring bells up in the crow's nest every half hour; we generally miss it.


They struck bells every 1/2 hour in response to the bells struck by the standby QM and as required by the IMM rule book,

Senator PERKINS. And you struck the bell every half hour?
Mr. HOGG. Yes. And for reporting ships you struck one, port; two, starboard; and three, right ahead.


 

Jim Currie

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That 'magician's hat' of yours must be getting empty, Sam. I'll answer both your posts here.

The points illustrated in that conversation with QM Rowe quoted in the letter from J. Powell are contradictions of all we know.

Take it step by step:

1. If they were firing the rockets while QM Rowe was still at the stern and he saw the first boat at 12-20 pm then that does not fit with any of the evidence available anywhere. Not even time time evidence.
The evidence from 5th Officer Lowe (and Lawrence Beesley) clearly shows that the first signal was fired from the starboard side at the bow of .lifeboat number 3. Other evidence shows that starboard side boats 5, 7 were launched 10 minutes before No. 3. began loading. That being the situation, Rowe could not have seen the first boat launched, nor could he have seen the first rocket launched.
As for Boxhall: as he was in the act of firing the first rocket, how on earth could he have missed seeing them loading boat 3, the third boat launched? Or have noticed that 7, and 5 had already been launched? You will recall he distinctly stated "- I do not know what time the first boat was lowered." The socket for launching the signals was no more than 100 feet aft of the locations of Nos. 5 and 7. He must have had recourse to clearing the area of passengers before he fired the first one off.

2. What I find far more interesting and the question you should be asking is why was it that when they were at the poop, neither Rowe nor his mate, Bright, make mention at any of the Inquiries mentioned seeing pyrotechnic signals...signals that they could not have missed unless they were blind, deaf and dumb.? Because without doubt, if they were not so afflicted, then after the detonation of the first of these signals at such close proximity they would have been temporarily deafened by the bang, blinded by the flash and their innards would have been vibrating. Believe me, witnessing one of these going off for the first time is a memorable occasion.

3. As for the evidence of 5th Officer Lowe, re 'detonator'. I'm not sure what point you are making. I'm sure you know this but allow me to remind you:
Detonators make a very loud BANG when they detonate. It may surprise you to know that the sound of a detonator exploding was a very familiar sound to Rowe...particularly if, as a lad, he had lived near a railway line. It was a familiar sound to every young person in the days of the steam railway and even much later when I was a lad. Projectiles themselves make very little sound except for the 'whoosh' of them passing through air. (unless they are faster than sound.).

4. I am perfectly aware of the reason behind Senator Smith's line of questioning. He asked a simple sailorman two questions:

a: At what time did you see the iceberg? and b: What was the interval between ringing three bells and impact.?

To question (a), Fleet answered truthfully: "I could not tell you the time.".
His questioner persisted. In so many words he suggested to Fleet: "Go on. Have a stab at it".
Fleet obliged and answered as any sailor would, not with a clock time but with "Just after 7 bells".

Then Smith asks question (b) which to Fleet would have seemed a different question.
Fleet once again answers honestly: " I have no idea."
These are the answers Fleet would have given to another sailor-man. He was not used to answering 'shysters'.
So the Shyster in question shot off into sarcastic space with his next line of questioning. He kept harping back to the theme. It would have saved an awful lot of time if he had established at the very beginning if there had been a means of telling time in the crow's nest. What did he expect? OK Guv! It's a fair cop. "We were fell asleep on duty and caused all that death."

I have no reason whatsoever to disbelieve Fleet. What I do believe is that he and his mate each had an understandably horrific guilt complex. Perhaps somehow, if they had seen the berg sooner they could have saved so many lives? Who knows?

5. Now for Hogg's remarks concerning the striking of bells in the Crow's Nest.
Hogg's previous duty was up to 8 pm, the previous time 8 bells were sounded. He would naturally assume he was being questioned about that and was being perfectly honest about it.
Boxhall was questioned about how he knew during his Watch from 10 to Midnight that the Lookouts were at their post in the Crow's. nest. He stated that he knew they were there, not from the repeating of the bridge bells but from the sound of their individual voices.
I was simply explaining to you that my experience of passenger ships fits with the evidence of Fleet.
Think about it. If at 11-30 pm, the bridge sounded 7 bells and this was immediately followed by the men in the nest sounding 7 bells on that massive thing they had up there, and/ or by the forecastle lookout doing the same on the anchor bell, that's 14 or even 21 continuous sounding of very loud bells. Then. shortly after, there there three more loud rings, followed shortly after that by 16 or 24 continuous rings.
I can tell you without fear of contradiction, he Chief Purser would be inundated by complaints from irate passengers the next morning.

On the subject of bells...a happy and Prosperous New Year to you and yours and to all my ET friends.
 
Nov 26, 2016
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About the bells,
Think about it. If at 11-30 pm, the bridge sounded 7 bells and this was immediately followed by the men in the nest sounding 7 bells on that massive thing they had up there, and/ or by the forecastle lookout doing the same on the anchor bell, that's 14 or even 21 continuous sounding of very loud bells. Then. shortly after, there there three more loud rings, followed shortly after that by 16 or 24 continuous rings.
I wonder whether passengers really would mind the bells. They are on a ship and not in a hotel, so they have to accept that the ship has engines and bells under working conditions. People living in the center of a city hear the bells of clock towers from the churches. These strike every quarter of an hour the number of the quarters, and at full hour four strikes for the quarters followed by the number of the hours twice, firstly with a high tune, secondly with a lower tune for those who did not manage to count the first time because they were in a doze. Nowadays they switch off the church bells after 10 pm., but not in 1912. Happy new year to everybody.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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The times that Rowe gave at the inquiries fits right in if you consider that he was going by the time that he would have set on his watch. His duty time began at 8pm. His watch would been set, like everyone else, to April 14th ship's time. Unless told otherwise, he knew that clock was to be put back about 23 minutes during his watch close to midnight, and his relief was expected to show up about 22 minutes later, when his adjusted timepiece would show 12:00 again. In his letter to Kamuda, Rowe stated that the ship struck at 11:40 and his relief was expected at 12:22. Clearly, these are unadjusted times. That's a period of 42 minutes between collision and start of April 15th on board the vessel. We were also told by Rowe (and Bright) that his relief failed to show up on time, which should have been at 12:00 adjusted time. Rowe stated at the inquiries that called the bridge at 25 after 12 to report a boat in the water. The order to first load the boats was given about 45 minutes after the collision. We have that from multiple sources including several passengers, AB Poingdestre and 2/O Lightoller. The first boat loaded and put down to the water was No. 7, followed about 5 minutes later by No. 5. The first rocket was sent up while the next boat, No. 3, was being loaded. Assuming 15 minutes to load the boat and 5 minutes to lower it safely 60 feet, we have about 20 minutes go by since the order to load the boats was given when boat No. 7 reached the water by the side of the vessel. Then it had to pull away far enough to actually be seen by someone standing at the rail on the poop deck. My guess, even if it was not said, was that it was the flash of a socket signal that allowed Rowe to see that boat in the water on the starboard beam, especially one that was launched several hundreds of feet away from where he was in the dark of night. Using time on his adjusted watch, it would have been close to 12:25. Also, keep in mind that Rowe said he was ordered to go away in collapsible C about 1:25, and that the ship sank about 20 minutes after his boat finally reached the water, which he said took about 5 minutes to lower. Assuming his boat reached the water by 1:40 using his adjusted time piece, we have the ship foundering close to 2am by his time, which would correspond to about 2:20 unadjusted time.

HAVE A GOOD NEW YEAR ALL !!!!
 

Jim Currie

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About the bells,
Think about it. If at 11-30 pm, the bridge sounded 7 bells and this was immediately followed by the men in the nest sounding 7 bells on that massive thing they had up there, and/ or by the forecastle lookout doing the same on the anchor bell, that's 14 or even 21 continuous sounding of very loud bells. Then. shortly after, there there three more loud rings, followed shortly after that by 16 or 24 continuous rings.
I wonder whether passengers really would mind the bells. They are on a ship and not in a hotel, so they have to accept that the ship has engines and bells under working conditions. People living in the center of a city hear the bells of clock towers from the churches. These strike every quarter of an hour the number of the quarters, and at full hour four strikes for the quarters followed by the number of the hours twice, firstly with a high tune, secondly with a lower tune for those who did not manage to count the first time because they were in a doze. Nowadays they switch off the church bells after 10 pm., but not in 1912. Happy new year to everybody.
Hello Markus.

I can only speak for my own experience and I never heard them ring after dark. But if tyhey were4 sounded after dark on Titanic, what would the purpose behind a lookout declaring:

At 5832. & 5833...."- I do not think we struck seven bells. I believe it was just after seven bells... We never, generally, ring bells up in the crow's nest every half hour; we generally miss it."

There is one thing that many researchers consistently forget and that is that all the Lookouts survived the disaster. There were 5 other Lookouts against which to test evidence. In fact, that very thing was done concerning the presence of mist on the horizon. For that reason, it would be rather silly to make a false statement about common practice when on Watch,

 
Mar 22, 2003
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There is one thing that many researchers consistently forget and that is that all the Lookouts survived the disaster. There were 5 other Lookouts against which to test evidence. In fact, that very thing was done concerning the presence of mist on the horizon. For that reason, it would be rather silly to make a false statement about common practice when on Watch,
So you believe all this crap about passwords?
17536. Yes, that is what I mean? - All that was handed over to me was, “Nothing doing; keep a look-out for small ice.”
17537. You did hear it at 6 o’clock “Keep a look-out for small ice”? - Yes, but I believe it is the usual password in the nests in these ships.
17538. I do not understand what you mean by that? - I do not believe they got it from the bridge at the time.
17539. Never mind where they got it from. You got it from them? - Yes.
17540. Who gave it to you? - Fleet and Lee - I think Lee gave it to me.
17541. You say you believe it is a usual password. Had you ever had it given you before, a password of that kind? - Sometimes.
17542. But I mean on this voyage? - Yes. I believe I did: I would not be quite sure. It seems a password there from what I can see of it.
17543. (The Commissioner.) I do not understand what you mean by a “password.” What do you mean? - A joke, Sir. I should think.
17544. (The Attorney-General.) A joke to the look-out men to keep a look-out for ice? - This is what is passed on to one another.

17545. Have you any recollection of their doing that to you on that night at 6 o’clock in the evening? - At 6 o’clock in the evening: “Nothing doing; keep a look-out for small ice.”
17546. (The Commissioner.) I am not sure that I understand you when you say you regarded that as a joke. What do you mean? - Well, as I say, it seems a password.
17547. Do you mean by “a password” a mere matter of form? - That is what they always seemed to say to me, Sir.
17548. What? - “Keep a look-out for ice” as we relieved each other.
17549. But I suppose they do not say that to you on board ship when you are going through the tropics? - No, there were no tropics there at that time.
17550. It is not a message that you get on all voyages at all times? - I never heard it before.
17551. (The Attorney-General.) How often had you heard it, if at all, before 6 o’clock that evening? - I heard it several times before that.
17552. How often had you heard it before. You say several times. Do you mean half-a-dozen times? - I have no idea how many times it was.
17553. But several times? - Several times.
17554. Several days before? - We were only out about three days.
17555. I know. - A couple of days before.
17556. Do you mean that every time you went and relieved them they gave you that password, as you call it? - Yes.
17557. Daytime or nighttime? - Any time they would pass it along to one another.
 

Jim Currie

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So you believe all this crap about passwords?
17536. Yes, that is what I mean? - All that was handed over to me was, “Nothing doing; keep a look-out for small ice.”
17537. You did hear it at 6 o’clock “Keep a look-out for small ice”? - Yes, but I believe it is the usual password in the nests in these ships.
17538. I do not understand what you mean by that? - I do not believe they got it from the bridge at the time.
17539. Never mind where they got it from. You got it from them? - Yes.
17540. Who gave it to you? - Fleet and Lee - I think Lee gave it to me.
17541. You say you believe it is a usual password. Had you ever had it given you before, a password of that kind? - Sometimes.
17542. But I mean on this voyage? - Yes. I believe I did: I would not be quite sure. It seems a password there from what I can see of it.
17543. (The Commissioner.) I do not understand what you mean by a “password.” What do you mean? - A joke, Sir. I should think.
17544. (The Attorney-General.) A joke to the look-out men to keep a look-out for ice? - This is what is passed on to one another.

17545. Have you any recollection of their doing that to you on that night at 6 o’clock in the evening? - At 6 o’clock in the evening: “Nothing doing; keep a look-out for small ice.”
17546. (The Commissioner.) I am not sure that I understand you when you say you regarded that as a joke. What do you mean? - Well, as I say, it seems a password.
17547. Do you mean by “a password” a mere matter of form? - That is what they always seemed to say to me, Sir.
17548. What? - “Keep a look-out for ice” as we relieved each other.
17549. But I suppose they do not say that to you on board ship when you are going through the tropics? - No, there were no tropics there at that time.
17550. It is not a message that you get on all voyages at all times? - I never heard it before.
17551. (The Attorney-General.) How often had you heard it, if at all, before 6 o’clock that evening? - I heard it several times before that.
17552. How often had you heard it before. You say several times. Do you mean half-a-dozen times? - I have no idea how many times it was.
17553. But several times? - Several times.
17554. Several days before? - We were only out about three days.
17555. I know. - A couple of days before.
17556. Do you mean that every time you went and relieved them they gave you that password, as you call it? - Yes.
17557. Daytime or nighttime? - Any time they would pass it along to one another.
Of course I believe it, Sam because I know what the man was talking about.

What that unfortunate, poorly educated man was trying to get over to this humourless individual was the fact that when Lookouts exchange position at the change of a Watch, they generally pass-on the 'word' concerning three kinds of information.

1. Information concerning something that is expected to be seen during the coming Watch i.e. a headland, a lightship or at night, the loom of a lighthouse or lightship. Even a derelict or wreckage.

2. Information of a general nature regarding an object that is commonly seen in the area of operation i.e icebergs or small ice or even a fog bank.

3. In the absence of anything imminent...a joke...."Watch out for mermaids". or to an Apprentice "Watch out for the Equator Line, we are due to cross it near the end of your Watch."
 

George Jacub

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The order to first load the boats was given about 45 minutes after the collision.
Close, but wrong.
The bosun piped "all hands on deck" at 11:50. (George Moore, Ernest Archer, John Poigndestre) Crewmen who responded (William Lucas, George Symons, others) said that five minutes later, 15 minutes after the collision, they were ordered by Murdoch to clear the boats.
Sometime between those two times, Boxhall roused Lightoller and Pitman. Lightoller said that when he left his quarters he met Wilde. "First of all the Chief Officer told me to commence to get the covers off the boats. I asked him then if all the hands had been called and he said "yes". " Lightoller started to clear No. 4 alone and as men showed up--he thought they were the next watch coming on duty at midnight--- he put them to work as he supervised.
When Boxhall spoke with Lightoller and Pitman he said the ship had hit an iceberg and the mail room was flooded. Note no mention of clearing the lifeboats. All this indicates that Boxhall was sent to get the officers up at about the same time as the boatswain piped "all hands", and that Lightoller was working at No.4 about the same time as Murdoch was ordering the deck crew to clear the boats. Lightoller even conceded as much at the British Inquiry:
13779. (The Commissioner.) Your curiosity was not sufficient to remain in the cold?
13780. To go on to the bridge?
- No, it was not a case of curiosity; it was not my duty to go on to the bridge when it was not my watch.
13781. (The Solicitor-General.) How long were you in your room after that before you did turn out?
- It is very difficult to say. I should say roughly about half-an-hour perhaps; it might have been longer, it might have been less.
13782. Did you go to sleep?
- Oh, no.
13783. (The Commissioner.) What on earth were you doing? Were you lying down in your bunk listening to the noises outside?
- There were no noises. I turned in my bunk, covered myself up and waited for somebody to come along and tell me if they wanted me.
13784. (The Solicitor-General.) Time is very difficult to calculate, especially when you are trying to go to sleep, but seriously do you think it was half-an-hour?
- That I was in my bunk after that?
13785. Yes?
- Well I did not think it was half-an-hour, but we have been talking this matter over a very great deal, and I judge it is half-an-hour, because it was Mr. Boxhall who came to inform me afterwards we had struck ice, and previous to him coming to inform me, as you will find out in his evidence, he had been a considerable way round the ship on various duties which must have taken him a good while. It might be less, it might be a quarter-of-an-hour. You will be able to form your judgment.

Clearing the first lifeboats took about 15 minutes. Lightoller then got the go-ahead to swing out the lifeboats

Lightoller, British Board of Trade Inquiry
13828 "From the time we commenced to strip No.4 boat cover until the time we swung them out I should judge would be probably at most 15 or 20 minutes."

Radio interview with Albert Horswell, Thursday 10 May 1934, transcript on Encyclopedia Titanica
"... orders were given to uncover the life-boats and 15 minutes later orders were given to swing out the davits."

In fact, Lightoller testified he didn't wait for No. 4 to be fully cleared before he went first to Wilde, then to the Captain to get the swing-out order. The time: about 12:10 a.m. (Horswell, Albert Dick, Henry Stengel, John Snyder). (The longer estimate of 20 minutes fails because Capt. Smith was seen below decks at 12:15 a.m. headed to the boiler rooms, so he wasn't on the bridge to give the order.)

Pitman testified at the Senate Inquiry it took only two minutes to get a lifeboat out with the new Wellin davits.
Mr. PITMAN.
... It struck me at the time the easy way the boat went out, the great improvement the modern davits were on the old-fashioned davits. I had about five or six men there, and the boat was out in about two minutes.

Taking the total of the evidence, by about 12:12 a.m. Monday morning, the lifeboats had been cleared and lowered even with the boat deck, at which point Lightoller sought out the Captain and got the order to load the boats. 12:12 a.m. not 12:25.
 

Jim Currie

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George,

Pitman said that when Boxhall called him it was within a few minutes of him (Pitman) being due on Watch, Pitman was due on Watch at 12-24 am April 14 time. If nothing had happened, then when Pitman went onto the bridge to start work, the time on the bridge clock would have been Midnight, not 12-24 am
 
Mar 22, 2003
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The bosun piped "all hands on deck" at 11:50....Taking the total of the evidence, by about 12:12 a.m. Monday morning, the lifeboats had been cleared and lowered even with the boat deck, at which point Lightoller sought out the Captain and got the order to load the boats. 12:12 a.m. not 12:25.
There are estimates of time durations all over the place. What feels like 10 minutes to one person can easily feel like 20 to another, especially when there is a lot of confusion going on. However, two time points early on can be given greater validity. The first is the collision time, which was noted by the time on a clock such as in the wheelhouse, and can be confirmed by others who noted the time by reference to some time piece somewhere. That time was about 11:40. The other one happens to come from lookout Symons who, if what he said was actually true, said that they struck 8 bells in the nest as he and others were on their way to the boat deck to uncover the boats having been given the order by the Bosun. That means the order for "All hands on the boat deck" came about 20 minutes after the collision, about the same time that Boxhall called on the off duty officers. Then you start adding the time needed to uncover the boats, coil up the falls, swing them out, and lower them to the rail, you can easily need "15 or 20 minutes" more. Then you need to have your passengers on deck by the boats so they can be loaded.
 

Jim Currie

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Sam,

If you are going to use the reference of 8 bells then there had to have been a time change. They would most certainly not sound 8 bells until the end of April 14th which was to be 24 hours and 46 minutes long. Or, until the 8 to Midnight Watch had served the full 4 hours 24 minutes or until the Lookouts Fleet and Lee had completed their total Watch time of 2 hours, 24 minutes.

The evidence clearly shows that the order to clear boats came some time between 11-50 pm and 11-55 pm.

AB Moore:
"About 10 minutes to 12 the boatswain came and piped all hands on the boat deck, and started to get out boats."

AB Poingdestre :
"2825. Now when the carpenter gave you that information how long do you think that was after the ship had struck the iceberg?
- I think about 10 minutes.... Stayed where I was.... A matter of a couple of minutes...[then] - The boatswain piped....- "All hands up and get the lifeboats ready."

Lookout Symonds:
"11354. "All hands stand by"? - Yes, "You may be wanted at any moment."
11356. What time was this? - By the time I got on deck it must have been about one bell, a quarter to twelve.
11357. That was after you had this order from the boatswain? - Yes... I came on deck and I went into the mess room in the course of ordinary events to see if there was any coffee. From there I heard the water coming in to No. 1 hold. I looked down No. 1 hold, and hardly had I looked down there when the order came for "All hands on the boat deck.".
 
Mar 22, 2003
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Jim, you quoted all subjective estimates. Note, that according to Symons, the first thing heard from the Bosun was "All hands standby..." Afterwards, came the order to get to the boat deck. It was his observation that as they were on their way to the boat deck when 8 bells was struck up in the nest. I assume that that specific event nails the time that they took to the boats as 12 o'clock, twenty minutes after the ship struck.
 
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Very good Statement! Full agreed!
BUT: I know that you plead that ship's time was adjusted to local apparent time of noon position and clocks were not altered before collision. That means, time of collision is 11.40 ship's time which is 2 hrs 2 minutes fast of EST.
In that case the first CDQ received 10.25 by Cape Race must have been transmitted at 12.27 unaltered ship's time, 20 minutes after "All hands standby..."
Are you convinced of this being the case?
 
Nov 26, 2016
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Jim, you quoted all subjective estimates. Note, that according to Symons, the first thing heard from the Bosun was "All hands standby..." Afterwards, came the order to get to the boat deck. It was his observation that as they were on their way to the boat deck when 8 bells was struck up in the nest. I assume that that specific event nails the time that they took to the boats as 12 o'clock, twenty minutes after the ship struck.
sorry, I forgot the quote .. #255 is supposed to be the reply to #254
 
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Mark Baber

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No, Markus, you didn't forget it; I removed it. There's no need to quote back the entire message you're responding to when it's the one immediately before the response. It just clutters things up and causes problems for folks---and there still are some---not on high-speed connections.
 
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In that case the first CDQ received 10.25 by Cape Race must have been transmitted at 12.27 unaltered ship's time, 20 minutes after "All hands standby..." Are you convinced of this being the case?
What I am convinced about is that the first CQD was transmitted about 25 minutes after the deck crew were seen first going to the boat deck to uncover the boats. All hands were called just a few minutes prior to that.
 

Jim Currie

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Sam, you stated:

"What I am convinced about is that the first CQD was transmitted about 25 minutes after the deck crew were seen first going to the boat deck to uncover the boats. All hands were called just a few minutes prior to that."

I can give you a sound argument which completely contradicts your conviction.

Boxhall told Senator Smith the following:

"I submitted her position to the captain....he said, "Take it to the Marconi.
Senator SMITH. What did you do with your information? A: There was too much noise of the steam escaping, so I wrote the position down for them and left it
."

Surviving Wireless Operator Bride stated in evidence:

"Q: You remained in bed until 12:05? A: I think it was this side of 12, sir; it was about 5 minutes to 12.
Q: Then you must have been aroused somewhat by this impact? A: No;.....
Q: And you awakened yourself? A: Yes....I went out to speak to him [W/O Phillips] before I dressed. I only had pajamas on...He told me that he thought she had got damaged in some way and that he expected that we should have to go back to Harland & Wolff's....
He was going to retire, sir...He got inside of the other room when the Captain came in, then.... He said, "You had better get assistance." When Mr. Phillips heard him he came out and asked him if he wanted him to use a distress call. He said, "Yes; at once."


In a memo to his employers Bride wrote:

"Mr. Phillips told me that apparently we had struck something, as previous to my turning out he had felt the ship tremble and stop, and expressed an opinion that we should have to return to Belfast.
I took over the telephone from him, and he was preparing to retire when Capt. Smith entered the cabin and told us to get assistance immediately.
Mr. Phillips resumed the phones, after asking the captain if he should use the regulation distress call "C Q D." The captain said "Yes," and Mr. Phillips started in with "C Q D," having obtained the latitude and longitude of the Titanic."

Later, in the same memo he writes:

"The noise of escaping steam directly over our cabin caused a deal of trouble to Mr. Phillips in reading the replies to our distress call, and this I also reported to Capt. Smith, who by some means managed to get it abated."

The foregoing evidence tells us that when Bride went into the wireless room to relieve Phillips, and a few minutes later, close to Midnight, when Captain Smith came to the wireless room and ordered them to send the first distress signal, the noise level did not interfere with normal conversation. However, 10 minutes later, when Boxhall came to the wireless room with the amended distress signal, the noise from the venting boilers was so great that conversation was impossible.

There would have been, as you know, two steam-venting sounds. The first would be during the time when line pressure was relieved whilst awaiting further engine movement orders. This would be immediately after the last Stop order. It would be the relatively gentle back ground 'hiss'. The second would be when the order was given to vent all boilers except those needed for pumps and generators. That would be the 'roar' which, on such a still night, would have been audible for very many miles.

Over and out!