How Far South did the Titanic Reach?

Jim Currie

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Aaron, depending where you were located in the ship, the collision felt very different to different people. Beesley was simply describing what the alision with the iceberg felt like to him at the time.

Michael, it's good to see some independent thinking here.

This is the point we are in disagreement about. I believe he got his speed by dividing the distance from noon to the corner, that he said he worked, out by 6 hours. The 126 miles to the corner is consistent with the vessel making 1549 miles at noon since departing Queenstown.
Yes I know he did Sam but you miss the point. He could not possibly have done that, even although he said he did. Not unless he was there at the time of the turn and had received notification from the standby QM at the stern docking bridge.
The most importat fact is that he had that speed number, and since he did not pluck it out of thin air, must have had a source for it. He plainly stated that he used the Patent Log. Simple logic tells us that and the only way he could have got it was when the standby QM at the stern made his scheduled report of the 6 pm Patent Log reading to the bridge.
 
May 3, 2005
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Again, Thanks Jim-
Our operations would probably be considered "Day Work"
But I never heard the term in the USN.
The only watch as such was from Taps to Reveile when someone would be assigned to be on duty to answer any trouble calls in the electronic equipment.
 
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Jim Currie

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I want to go back to Markus's post from the 23rd re : the course made good after turning the corner. I've done the figures myself and I think I broadly agree with him, the course made good was 265, not 266. Thanks to Sam, by the way, for helping me understand how these calculations are made.

Starting from a noon position of 43°02'N 44°31 (126 NM from The Corner @ 60.5°T), 5h50m of steaming at 22 knots at 240.5°T gets us to an actual turning point of
41°59′N, 47°03′W, an overshoot of 2.33 miles. From there, I assume a travel time of an additional 5h50m to get us to 11:40pm. On a course of 266°T at 22 knots, that gets us to
41°50′N 49°52′W. 22.5 knots gets us to 41°49N 49°56′W. Both longitudes are fairly close to the longitude of the wreck sight, but the latitude doesn't work out. A course of 265°T for 5h50m at 22 knots gets us to 41°47.6'N 49°51.7'W, while 22.5 knots gets us to 41°47.3'N 49°55.6'W, which is very close in both latitude and longitude. Of course, the math works out differently if you assume Titanic overshot the corner by a greater or lesser distance, or if you believe a clock setback had taken place before the collision (I remain unconvinced, personally).
Hello Michael.

You will never be convinced if you deny the evidence of 5th Officer Lowe to the effect that the ship slowed down after Noon April 14.
Nor will you be convinced if you believe that Titanic was aimed at The Corner at Noon April, 14 and hit the target right on the mark at exactly 5-50 pm.
Last but not least, if you want to be convinced, you will also have to accept the evidence of Boxhall that clearly points to Titanic making less than 22 knots before 7-30 pm sights that night.

There is one undeniable truth, and that is that in order for the run time from Noon until impact to be 11 hours 40 minutes, Titanic's speed must never have fallen below 22 knots.

There is a simple explanation to all of this. Titanic did slow down and she turned onto her new course at a point to the east of The Corner, before she had completed the estimated distance to go at Noon that day.

I suggest that you carefully go back through the evidence of messrs Lowe and Boxhall specific to the three points mentioned in the first paragraph of this reply. Apply the information therein to your original calculations then get back to us with your thoughts.
 

Jim Currie

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Hello Marcus.

Lowe used the Patent Log Readings. He came on Watch at 6 pm. He would receive these for 6 pm from the Quarter Master on duty at the stern. As I have pointed out to Sam previously, Lowe was very decided about the ship's speed. :

" Her speed from noon until we turned the corner was just a fraction under 21 knots.
If you take the average speed from 12 to 6 - that is giving her a run of six hours - she will not jump up in two hours [from 6pm to 8pm], from 12 to 6 o'clock, from that average speed. You have six hours in there to take a mean on.

But you had means, had you not, of ascertaining definitely how fast the ship was going? A: m- In what way, sir? We have the log -...
6258. (interposing). Between 6 and 8 o'clock. A: - We have the log.
And you are able to say that the speed at that time was 21 knots? A: - Twenty-one knots or under; it was really 20.95, about. "

If as it seems, Lowe used the patent Log reading at 6 pm and got an average speed from Noon of 20.95 knots then the log reading at 6 pm was 125.7 nautical miles.
Furthermore, if Titanic was making an average speed of 20.95 knots then at 5-50 pm when she turned, the Patent Log would have read 122.2 miles and she had another (260 minus 122.2 miles =)137.8 miles to run by Patent Log on a course of 265 True before she hit the iceberg.
If she hit the ice berg at 41-45'North, 49-56'West, then when she turned at 5-50 pm, she did so at 41-57' North, 46-52'W, about 6.5 ESE of her planned turning point, The Corner. In other words, the head current forced her back and to the southward of her intended course for The Corner.

We know that Titanic was making 22.5 knots after 8 pm that evening. If the clocks had not been touched before impact, then from 8 pm until 11-40 pm...3 hours 40 minutes... she would have covered a distance of 82.5 nautical miles. Since she had 137. 8 miles to run when she turned at 5-50 pm, this means she had to cover a distance of 137.8 minus 82,5 = 55.3 miles in 2 hours and 10 minutes. To do that she would have needed to increase speed after 5-50 pm to 25.53 knots and we know that is totally absurd.
Now consider the situation if the clocks had been retarded by 24 minutes at Midnight April 4 and the ship had run-on for another 4 minutes before impact took place. If this had been the case, then Titanic would have run 12 hours and 4 minutes from Noon that day before she hit the ice. It would also mean that instead of running for 3 hours 40 minutes at 22.5 knots, from 8 pm that evening until 11-40 pm, she ran for 4 hours and 4 minutes at 22.5 knots.
In that time she would have used-up 91.5 nautical miles of the total 137.8 mentioned above. This would leave 46 .3 miles to be divided by the 2 hours 10 minute period between 5-50 pm and 8 pm. The result is an average speed from the turn until 8 pm of 21.4 knots.

To summarise:

The evidence clearly shows that Titanic's average speed between Noon April 14 and 6 pm that evening fell to 20.95 knots. This indicates that her forward progress was being hampered by a 1 + knot current. During the run from Noon toward the planned turning position named The Corner, the head current that hampered her also pushed her to the southward of her intended course. The result was that at 5-50 pm., when she turned onto her course for New York, she was about 6.5 miles ENE of The Corner.
Between 6 pm and 8 pm. her speed began to build so that between 6 pm and 8 pm in the evening., her average speed increased to 21.4 knots. After the conditions became flat calm, her speed increased to 22.5 knots and she maintained that speed until she hit the iceberg.
There is absolutely no doubt that Titanic's clocks were retarded by 24 minutes before she hit the iceberg.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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You cannot convince me that the speed through the water carrying the same number of revolutions on a vessel as large as Titanic would speed up as much as 1.5 knots simply going from moderate seas with only 6 ft waves to a flat calm.
 
Nov 26, 2016
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So at 6pm, the log WOULD have shown 132 miles traveled, but the actual distance traveled would have been something less if the ship was travelling at 22 knots through the water.
The log measures miles travelled through the water.
Case 1, no wind, no current, log reading 132 miles in six hours, 132 miles made good, 22 knots over ground.
Case 2, no wind, 1 knot head current, log reading 132 miles in six hours, 126 miles made good, 21 knots over ground.
Case 3, westerly wind, no head current, log reading 126 miles in six hours, 126 miles made good, 21 knots over ground.
 
A

Aaron_2016

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Looking at photos of her starboard propeller, it does appear one of the blades is missing, or at least the bolts that held it in place are missing.





propeller01b.PNG


propeller01a.PNG



.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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Ah, you're right. Wind would affect speed through the water, current would not. I wasn't sure. I'll edit my post accordingly. (Never mind, I guess there's a time limit on editing posts here.)
 
Nov 26, 2016
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...
True, Titanic sailed in the Edwardian era, but the importance of rules and customs was only slightly changed from that earlier period.
...
But, that was not the way of 1912 or the conduct of Titanic’s voyage. Their system of change raised the real possibility of confusing the performance of half-hourly time checks. Hence, two clocks; one for the crew and another for passengers and official ship's time. But, that took place only during the period during which the time was changed from one day's noon to another.

-- David G. Brown
They had to strike the bells every thirty minutes, but during clock setback the Intervall between 7 bells and 8 bells would have been enlarged or reduced.
The log was read every two hours, but the last reading will cover an Intervall of 2 hours 23 minutes or 1 hour 37 minutes. So i think, the same can be done with the time Intervalls for compass check. I do not see why they need a separate time keeping procedure for that?
 

Jim Currie

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Sam:

David wrote:
"There is too much crew testimony about the ship striking the iceberg some 20 minutes before change of watch to dispute this."[ a partial clock change.]

You replied:
"As you know, I do dispute this assertion. I do believe many who were awakened may have thought that they were due on watch in 20 minutes time, but those who were on duty and most aware of the true time such as Hichens and Haines knew otherwise."

Your belief is based on what? On what principal, do you believe crew members who were awake 5 minutes or even 10 minutes after the event were so stupid as to continue to be mistaken as to the time and when they were due on duty?

You declare that Hichens knew otherwise. That's rubbish and you know it. Hichens was perfectly honest on the subject of clock change. Do I need to remind you? I think not. However, I will make sure that those who may have short memories are reminded: Hichens clearly stated:

"I do not know whether they put the clock back or not. The clock was to go back that night 47 minutes, 23 minutes in one watch and 24 in the other."

What part of the foregoing illustrates Hichens's knowledge of a clock change?

Then there's the 'old sweetie'... the evidence of Assistant Bosun Haines.

Haines was in charge of the Starboard Watch.. the Watch on duty. It's members were to get an extra 24 minutes. He was not asked about a clock change, he simply volunteered information about a change.
None of us know whether he was referring to a full or partial change. However we must presume that he was perfectly aware that a change was to take place when he went off Watch at Midnight,. Therefore, the right time for the starboard Watch when impact took place, was 20 minutes to 12 without a change in the clock as it was then.

"but those who were on duty and most aware of the true time........................... knew otherwise."

They certainly did Sam. So why do you deny the following?

Fredrick Fleet - Lookout:

5217. How long after you had taken your place in the crow's nest? A: - The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest.
5218. How long a watch did you have? A: - Two hours; but the time was going to be put back - that watch.
5219. The time was to be set back? A: A: - Yes, sir.
5220. Did that alter your time? A: - We were to get about 2 hours and 20 minutes.


5255. You remained in the crow's nest? A: - I remained in the crow's nest until I got relief.
5256. And Lee remained in the nest? A: - Yes.
5257. How long did you stay there? A: - About a quarter of an hour to 20 minutes after.
5258. After what? A: - After the accident.
5217. How long after you had taken your place in the crow's nest? A: - The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest.
17318. Then did you remain on the crow's-nest? A: - Yes.
17319. Until eight bells? A: - Till eight bells went.
17320. At eight bells, in the ordinary course, you were relieved? A: - Yes.

In your post to David you wrote:

As you can see from the logbook pages in post #216 above, what you call true midnight (when the date changes) occurs at the end of the 12th hour of the PM when 8 bells are struck. In the case of Titanic that was to happen at 12 hours 23 (or 24) minutes after local apparent noon of April 14.

So can we now cut out this nonsense and agree that Lookouts Fleet and Lee were relieved in the Crows Nest at 12 Midnight...8 bells...20 minutes after impact...3:23 am GMT, April 15?
That the first CQD was received 3 minutes earlier at 11-57 pm. ship, 3:20 am GMT April 15, 10:20 pm EST New York?
That Bxoshall's CQD was received 5 minutes later at 12-02 am ship, 3:25 am GMT April 15, 10:25 pm EST New York?




 
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....The question should be asked: " If the engines were useless after 11-55 pm, why on earth would the captain keep a man on the wheel for another 28 minutes when every last one was needed to clear the boats. Anyway, by 12-20 am, the boats were cleared and ready for lowering and filling.
Good question, indeed. Hichens, Rowe and Fleet exspected to be releaved at 12.23 not altered time.

Now have a look on the testimony of Mr Rowe:

Senator BURTON. Where were you the night of the collision?
Mr. ROWE. I felt a slight jar and looked at my watch. It was a fine night, and it was then 20 minutes to 12.
I looked toward the starboard side of the ship and saw a mass of ice. I then remained on the after bridge to await orders through the telephone. No orders came down, and I remained until 25 minutes after 12, when I saw a boat on the starboard beam.

I think Rowe is not switching between altered and unaltered time. His statement is given consequently in unaltered time. Supposed, the collision occured at 12.04 unaltered time, it is unlikly that a boat was lowered at 12.25.

Hichens was supposed to stay on duty in the wheelhouse unless new orders were given. The question is where the order to clear the boats was given, on the Bridge or outside? So Hichens did not get it, or he was forgotten similar as was Rowe.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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Haddock sent this telegram to Rostron. But why should Rostron do any calculation about mean solar time of Haddock's position?
He didn't. The position given in that message from Rostron to Haddock on April 15th was Carpathia's position, not Olympic's. Rostron was simply informing Haddock where his ship, Carpathia, was at a specific point in time, and more importantly, where he was headed. Unlike others here on this forum who somehow knows all about the conversation that took place between Rostron, Lightoller and Boxhall, I only pointed out an observation that produces a very interesting and very suspicious coincidence. Nobody can deny that Carpathia's position given by Rostron in that message to Haddock is precisely 3h 27m behind GMT; the exact same time difference we find in the message he sent to Haddock just 45 minutes later when he gave the time Titanic foundered in ship's time and GMT.

It is all too easy to assume what some people knew or didn't know. But I do not for a moment believe that Rostron would ask what the time difference was between Titanic time and NY time. As Jim Currie points out many times here, the only time that mattered to ship's officers is ship's time, by which they stood watch and ate and slept, and Greenwich mean time by which they used to navigate. Rostron was clearly interested in what GMT was when it was 2:20am ship's time on Titanic. Mean solar time at the Ambrose light vessel was irrelevant, so too was mean solar time for New York city. Sen. Burton's remark was not only a bit strange, but also incorrect. Mean solar time for NY was and still is 4h 56m behind GMT, not 4h 57m as Burton announced. Mean solar time at the Ambrose channel light vessel, the official arrival/departure point for ships going in and out NY harbor, was 4h 55m behind GMT and appears in Reed's table. But Sen. Smith asked what the time was in NY when Titanic foundered so he could put it in the record. Notice that he told Pitman that he was given ship's time and Greenwich time which he just happen to get from Lightoller. He also answered his own question after Pitman told him to take 5 hours off Greenwich time, but Smith wanted Pitman to work it out and gave Pitman the foundering time in GMT that Lightoller gave him just a few minutes earlier after Pitman asked him "Give me the Greenwich time, please?" What's funny is that Pitman got 11:47 by subtracting 5 hours from 5:47, something Sen. Burton immediately noted and Sen. Smith corrected to 12:47. The exchanges between the three, Pitman, Smith and Burton, is almost comical.

I have a suspicion as to how that 3h 27m difference came about, but I'll save that for another post. Just note that it never surfaced at the British inquiry which decided on something totally different altogether.
 
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Sam:

Fredrick Fleet - Lookout:

5217. How long after you had taken your place in the crow's nest? A: - The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest.
5218. How long a watch did you have? A: - Two hours; but the time was going to be put back - that watch.
5219. The time was to be set back? A: A: - Yes, sir.
5220. Did that alter your time? A: - We were to get about 2 hours and 20 minutes.


5255. You remained in the crow's nest? A: - I remained in the crow's nest until I got relief.
5256. And Lee remained in the nest? A: - Yes.
5257. How long did you stay there? A: - About a quarter of an hour to 20 minutes after.
5258. After what? A: - After the accident.
5217. How long after you had taken your place in the crow's nest? A: - The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest.
17318. Then did you remain on the crow's-nest? A: - Yes.
17319. Until eight bells? A: - Till eight bells went.
17320. At eight bells, in the ordinary course, you were relieved? A: - Yes.
I have some problems with the testimony of Fleet, his testimony in US looks sowewhat unsettled, unsure:
Mr. FLEET. Well, I reported an iceberg right ahead, a black mass.
Senator SMITH. When did you report that?
Mr. FLEET. I could not tell you the time.
Senator SMITH. About what time?
Mr. FLEET. Just after seven bells.
--- maybe there is one anchor point here, would that be 11.30 or 11.53?
Senator SMITH. How long after you had taken your place in the crow's nest?
Mr. FLEET. The watch was nearly over. I had done the best part of the watch up in the nest.
Senator SMITH. How long a watch did you have?
Mr. FLEET. Two hours; but the time was going to be put back - that watch.
Senator SMITH. The time was to be set back?
Mr. FLEET. Yes, sir.
Senator SMITH. Did that alter your time?
Mr. FLEET. We were to get about 2 hours and 20 minutes.
Senator SMITH. How long before the collision or accident did you report ice ahead?
Mr. FLEET. I have no idea.
Senator SMITH. About how long?
Mr. FLEET. I could not say, at the rate she was going.
Senator SMITH. How fast was she going?
Mr. FLEET. I have no idea.
Senator SMITH. Would you be willing to say that you reported the presence of this iceberg an hour before the collision? Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. Forty-five minutes? Mr. FLEET. No. sir.
Senator SMITH. A half hour before? Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. Fifteen minutes before? Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. Ten minutes before?
Mr. FLEET. No, sir.
Senator SMITH. How far away was this black mass when you first saw it?
Mr. FLEET. I have no idea, sir.
Senator SMITH.
Can you not give us some idea? Did it impress you as serious?
Mr. FLEET. I reported it as soon as ever I seen it.
 
Nov 26, 2016
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Hello Marcus.that her forward progress was being hampered by a 1 + knot current. During the run from Noon toward the planned turning position named The Corner, the head current that hampered her also pushed her to the southward of her intended course. The result was that at 5-50 pm., when she turned onto her course for New York, she was about 6.5 miles ENE of The Corner.
Between 6 pm and 8 pm. her speed began to build so that between 6 pm and 8 pm in the evening., her average speed increased to 21.4 knots. After the conditions became flat calm, her speed increased to 22.5 knots and she maintained that speed until she hit the iceberg.
There is absolutely no doubt that Titanic's clocks were retarded by 24 minutes before she hit the iceberg.
 
Mar 22, 2003
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This is all starting to sound like a broken vinyl record. At the risk of repeating myself for the Nth time:

Read carefully Fleet's words in answer to the question of how long of a watch did they have. He did not say that his watch lasted two hours and twenty minutes. What he did say was that it lasted 2 hours, but they were suppose to get about 2 hours 20 minutes.. His exact words were: "Two hours; but the time was going to be put back - that watch...We were to get about 2 hours and 20 minutes." He never said they got 2 hours and 20 minutes. In the so called normal course of events, a lookout's watch up in the nest lasted 2 hours which was served fours times a day except for the 10pm to midnight lookout watch and midnight to 2am lookout watch. Those were the only ones that were either longer or shorter than normal because of the clock change that occurred around midnight.

Hichens was simply saying that he had no idea if they ever put the clock back that night. Up until the time he left the wheelhouse, at 12:23, he did not see it go back. He was very clear that he was at the wheel 1 hour and 40 minutes when three bells were struck up in the nest, and then was relieved when QM Perkis arrived at 12:23. If the clock had gone back earlier, then Perkis should have arrived by 12:00 altered time, which by the way, is what Perkis said he did; i.e., waited until he was due on deck at midnight. It was when Perkis arrived that a senior officer noticed them in the wheelhouse and ordered them to go to help clear the boats.

And by the way, if the clock had been put back that night then the time from 7 bells at 11:30 to 8 bells would have been 53 or 54 minutes, not the usual 30 minutes, and the accident would have happened 33 or 34 minutes after 7 bells was struck. But we have multiple sources, including lookout Lee who was up in the nest with Fleet, who said that the accident happened about 10 minutes after 11:30, not 33 or 34 minutes after.

As for Bosun's mate Haines, he was simply setting the record straight about when the ship struck. As Fleet said, the clock was supposed to go back during his watch on deck. Haines removed the ambiguity about the time when he said that the right time without putting the clock back was 20 minutes to twelve. He didn't say the right time without putting the clock back a second time. For me, it doesn't get any clearer.

And the other point I keep repeating is the physical evidence of the two log readings that we were given, the 45 mile advance over two hours and how it relates to the 260 miles between noon and the collision. If the time period from noon to collision was 12 hours and 4 minutes, as you and David keep insisting, then the average two hour advance of the ship through the water would have been 43.1 miles, well under what we were told. However, if the time between noon and the collision was 11 hours 40 minutes, then the average advance of the log works out to 44.6 miles, which fits right in with what we were told.

Oh, I also left out those that were waiting up in the smoking room for the clock change to occur at midnight so they could set their personal timepieces to the new time which never happened because an accident got in the way. Or those that had their watches set earlier that evening to ship's time and noticed that the ship struck at about a quarter to twelve.
 

Jim Currie

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Hello Lads.

This discussion is interesting but academic. The fact of the matter is that if Titanic's 5th Officer Lowe used a precise speed of 20.95 knots to work a DR position, he did not pluck that number from the sky. He must have got it from a Patent Log Reading. He came on Watch at 6 pm that evening. At that time, the Patent Log reading would have been passed to the bridge. He would simply have divided that reading by 6 to get an average speed from Noon that day. Now ask yourselves this:
Why is that evidence rejected yet the 10 pm Patent Log reading given by QM Hichens in his evidence showing a speed of 22.5 knots is universally accepted without question?

As for the Patent Log? I've streamed and used one of these things more times than I can remember. However what I do remember is that despite the weather conditions, including fierce storms, they recorded the distance traveled with an accuracy that was only restricted by mechanical failure, improper streaming, initial calibration or fouling by floating objects. Here is an extract from examination questions and answers posed to masters and Mates at the time of, and after the Titanic disaster, The red emphasis is mine:
Patent Logs. 001.jpg
 

Jim Currie

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Looking at photos of her starboard propeller, it does appear one of the blades is missing, or at least the bolts that held it in place are missing.





View attachment 2436

View attachment 2437


.
Yes, it certainly looks like that, Aaron. However the impact on the sea bed was considerable and the blade may be buried o simply ripped-off. The other blades are undamaged as they would be if the missing blade had hit a hard object because after that, the shaft would continue to spin for some time. In the case of contact with ice, I would expect to see at least one bent tip.
 
Nov 26, 2016
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Hello Jim,
many thinks for that post #80, up to now I did not realize that Lowe referenced to the log taken at 6 o'clock, somewhow I have overlooked this.
But some objections come up.

Just to fix the basic conditions first.
The noon position is 126 miles before the corner, based on noon observations, as i understood Lowe's testimony. The place to hit the ice berg, you assume nearly the same as me, 41-45' N and 49-56' W is 132 miles behind the corner. These two add up to 258 miles.

Either you or Sam told me, if the ship was heading to the corner, she must not necessary pass through it. Agreed, of course I am aware of this.
But because of the flat angle of 25 degrees the point can vary some miles without considerable change of the sum. 5 miles to NW make 256 miles, 5 miles to SE make 260 miles. So we have chance to play some games.

Now about the log. The log indicates miles travelled through the water.
From Saturday noon to Sunday noon Titanic travelled 546 miles over ground. Speed was 22.1 knots over ground average.
Assume a gulfstream of 0.4 knots this would make 22.5 knots through the water. Hichens took the log at 10 pm. It indicated 45 miles in 2 hours, 22.5 miles through the water. There we are! I don't know why Hichens had to give a separate testimony about this, there is no reason to get upset. Titanic made this 25 hours the day before.

Rowe read the log after collision, it showed 260 miles from noon to collision.
This works out either 22.2 knots in 11,7 hours, with clocks not retarded or 21.5 knots in 12.1 hours, with clocks retarded. As the revolutions were not changed, may be one engine doing 76 rpm iso 75 for some time, i would exspect the log should always indicate the same speed through the water. The results would rather suggest there was no clock retardation, for the first.

Now we come to Lowe. The log indicated 126 miles at 6 pm, speed 21 knots through the water.
When i have a look on my map at the corner and to the NE of it, it shows northatlantic current of 0.4 to 0.8 knots. This will reduce the speed even to let's say 20.5 knots.
Here my problem with the log. If revolutions are unchanged, why does the same log indicate 21 knots in the afternoon and 22.5 knots after 8 pm? Can this be explained by changed weather conditions?
You found the turning point 41-57 N and 46-52 West. I am wondering why this is south to the corner? Probably your current is directed to East, the current in my map is going ENE, right opposite to Titanic's course.The two branches before and after the corner add up to 260 miles.

As I am skeptical about the speed of 21 knots, I would like to play four cases:

Speed over ground from 12 to 8 pm: 20.5 knots
distance travelled: 164 miles
remaining distance: 96 miles
Speed from 8 to 11.40 respectively to 12.04: 25.9 / 23.4 knots

Speed over ground from 12 to 8 pm: 21.0 knots
distance travelled: 168 miles
remaining distance: 92 miles
Speed from 8 to 11.40 respectively to 12.04: 24.9 / 22.4 knots

Speed over ground from 12 to 8 pm: 21.2 knots
distance travelled: 170 miles
remaining distance: 90 miles
Speed from 8 to 11.40 respectively to 12.04: 24.3 / 22.0 knots

Speed over ground from 12 to 8 pm: 21.5 knots
distance travelled: 172 miles
remaining distance: 88 miles
Speed from 8 to 11.40 respectively to 12.04: 23.8 / 21.5 knots

Indeed we get realistic results with retarded clocks only.
With 21.2 knots on the branch before the corner we meet well the 22 knots estimated by Boxhall.
But the log should have indicated a bit more, 21.5 or so.

kind regards
Markus
 

Jim Currie

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Funchal. Madeira
I'm sorry that I cannot do that, Sam, specially if you do not want to be convinced. However, since hope springs eternal, I'll try.

Despite your ideas to the contrary, Titanic was not delayed by the North Atlantic Drift Current because it is a wind-generated current and the weather systems during the period were not from the prevailing direction of South West. It follows that the average speed of 22.1 knots at 74 rpm for the previous days run was probably correct. The winds were from the west and north west and set her to the south east. If anything, they may have given her a little nudge and her average speed sans wind was probably close to 22 knots, half a knot faster that indicated by propeller revolutions. However there was sea and swell and this would effect her speed
Lightoller, and Boxhall estimated speed based on engine rpm. Since the ship was new, they would expect 74 rpm to equate to 21.5 knots and said so. On the other hand, Pitman used both rpm and the patent log.

If, in fact Titanic could make 22 knots given the conditions prevailing April 13/14, then she would go faster than that in the totally unusual flat calm conditions prevailing after 7-30 pm that night. However, if the sea conditions prior to Noon April 14 prevailed that afternoon but she dropped her speed by 1 knot, then there was a 1 knot current acting against her. She would keep that speed as long as her course, engine rpm., current direction and weather conditions remained unchanged. When she turned onto her 265T Course, the current would be acting on her port side. However, the strength of the current would start to reduce as she got nearer and nearer to it's northern margin. If she broke free of it's northern margin at or near dusk and the weather conditions had improve beyond what they were at Noon that day then by 8 pm she would have built her speed to it's optimum for the prevailing conditions...22 knots + 0.5 knots = 22.5 knots In short, all restriction to her achieving her optimum speed for 74 rpm had been removed.

Still not convinced?