How far was the 1929 earthquake from the Titanic wreck site?

Dan Kappes

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Before the wreck was found in 1985, there were fears that this earthquake buried the wreck.

Does anyone have any information about this earthquake?

Also, I've read somewhere that the wreck of the Titanic is near a canyon. Is it on top of the canyon, or what is its position relative to it?
 

Dave Gittins

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The epicentre was at 44°54N. 56°01W. There's a big article on Wikipedia about it. I'm too lazy to get out the traverse tables and work out the distance from the wreck.
 

Seumas

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Wasn't there some utterly ridiculous theory proposed a number of years ago that the Titanic had sank intact but that the 1929 quake broke the ship apart and destroyed most of the superstructure ?

I'm positive that there was some fantasist "doing the rounds" trying to drum up support for this completely stupid theory. It was quite a few years ago now.
 
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Dave Gittins

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It was in a book by a ratbag called Marmaduke Collins. Apart from the earthquake "theory" he tried to show that Titanic never hit an iceberg. There are threads about it.
 

Seumas

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It was in a book by a ratbag called Marmaduke Collins. Apart from the earthquake "theory" he tried to show that Titanic never hit an iceberg. There are threads about it.
Ah, thank you Dave. So it was Collins who was behind all that nonsense ? And here was me prepared to give the notorious Pellegrino the blame for it !

I'd previously taken a skim through an old thread where Collins rather obnoxiously argued for his extremely loopy idea that the Titanic hit pack ice (that magically ended up on the forward well deck) but didn't know he was further responsible for proposing another fairy tale that she had sank intact. He died two or three years back I'm sure.
 
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Seumas

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Pellegrino is a strange Titanic historian. His book Her Name, Titanic compares the Titanic with the space shuttle Challenger disaster and mentions that Morgan Robertson not only predicted the Titanic disaster but World War II as well.
Unfortunately, the Titanic disaster (Lusitania to for that matter) has proven irresistible to rank rotten, mediocre historians and fantasists which i'd include Pellegrino and Gardiner in.

Thankfully we have resources such as ET to help us identify what is well worth reading and watching and what to best to ignore and discard.
 
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Dan Kappes

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I don't know how Collins could think that the 1929 earthquake broke the Titanic in two, when quite a few survivors reported it splitting in the final moments of the sinking.

Also, can someone please post me a link to the Wikipedia article about the 1929 earthquake or any other websites about it?
 

Mark Baber

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18 November 1929: At 3:30 p.m., about 300 miles from Cape Race, Olympic experiences a violent tremor and sustained vibration for two minutes. After the carpenter and officers find no damage to the ship, Capt. W. H. Parker concludes that the cause was "submarine volcanic action". Later, radio reports from shore confirm that the ship was shaken by the Grand Banks Earthquake, which was felt on land from New York City to Nova Scotia. (Source: The New York Times, 19 and 21 November 1929.)
 

Dan Kappes

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The 1990 novel by Arthur C. Clarke titled The Ghost From the Grand Banks, which is about an effort to raise both halves of the wreck of the Titanic in time for the centennial of its sinking in 2012, features some dialogue about the 1929 earthquake. Here are some quotes from it:

Character 1: What happened in 1929?
Character 2: The Grand Banks Earthquake. It triggered a turbidity current-call it an underwater avalanche. Snapped the telegraph cables one after the other, like cotton, as it raced across the seabed. That's how its speed was calculated-sixty kilometers an hour. Perhaps more. The 1929 quake didn't touch Titanic, though many people thought she'd been buried; luckily, it was a couple of hundred kilometers to the west. Most of the sediment was diverted into a canyon, and missed the wreck completely.
 
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I had heard of the quake but never read up on it before. I just read the article from the link posted by Mark B. Interesting. 12 undersea telegraph cables snapped by that quake. I wonder how long it took to repair/replace them.
 
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