How high was Britannic's stern during the sinking

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MATTHEW JOSEPH COOPER

Guest
How high did Britannic's stern rise out of the water when It was sinking.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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No way to know really. We know it came out high enough for a boat to be sucked into a still spinning propellor (Talk about Excedrin Headache #666!) but I doubt it would have come up much higher since by then, the bow was already in contact with the bottom.
 
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MATTHEW JOSEPH COOPER

Guest
John A. Fleming said she went perpendicular could It be possible that the water was deep that day than It is now.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>John A. Fleming said she went perpendicular <<

He was wrong.

>>could It be possible that the water was deep that day than It is now.<<

No. The depth of the water in this area is well known and was known back then. To get the sort of shift in depth you're thinking of would take a supermassive earthquake the likes of which hasn't been seen on this planet at any time in recorded history.

UN-recorded may be another matter entirely, but that goes way too far back to be of any relevance here.
 
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MATTHEW JOSEPH COOPER

Guest
I think Hospital Ship Britannic website had a sinking timeline that showed it coming in the air really high.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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She could have not come very high in the air. The ship was a little over 882 feet long and the water about 400 feet deep. Her stem was touching the seabed while her stern was still out on the water.
Also she was rolling to starboard, the stern settled back and sunk under water.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,588
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Easley South Carolina
>>I think Hospital Ship Britannic website had a sinking timeline that showed it coming in the air really high.<<

You think? You don't know?

Be that as it may, what Ioannis speaks to is the depth of the water in the location where the Britannic sank. There's simply no possible way that she could have gone perpendicular.
 

Grant Carman

Member
Jun 19, 2006
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Just a suggestion Matthew.

Wiki sites are notorious for not being completely accurate. Any site that can be edited by a reader must be taken with a grain of salt.
 
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MATTHEW JOSEPH COOPER

Guest
Yes I know that but that I believe was on Hospital Ship Britannic.com website which mentions her stern rising 105 feet in the air.
 

Shel Cooper

Member
Nov 8, 2013
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Maybe 25 degrees at the absolute most. 400 ft deep, 900 ft long ship. The bow hit the bottom and the stern settled. Lusitania sank pretty much the same way.