How Much Ice Fell on the Deck?


Andrew

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Oct 25, 2016
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That's good information, thanks Dave.
I realise bergs melt & get smaller after a year at sea, but wasn't aware they get more fragile.
Although I still think it would need a more direct hit than the glancing, sliding impact the Titanic gave it.
We're talking about chunks flying upwards and outwards, after all.
However, I am just playing devils advocate a bit here - I bow to your better knowledge of these things!
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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That's good information, thanks Dave.
I realise bergs melt & get smaller after a year at sea, but wasn't aware they get more fragile.
Although I still think it would need a more direct hit than the glancing, sliding impact the Titanic gave it.
We're talking about chunks flying upwards and outwards, after all.
However, I am just playing devils advocate a bit here - I bow to your better knowledge of these things!
Andrew, even if we suppose that the only impact Titanic had with the iceberg was Titanic grounding herself on an underwater portion of said berg, ice could have still fallen onto Titanic; and again, remember that Titanic was a 40,000 ton metal object moving at 23 miles per hour. The vibration alone from the impact of a glancing blow, or a grounding, would have broken ice loose.
 
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chrismireya

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Remember: A ship is wider at the top than the bottom. An iceberg, on the other hand, doesn't follow any particular set of rules.We don't know if an actual photograph of that iceberg exists. Of the icebergs photographed, I do think that the Rehorek iceberg most adequately fits the description as suggested by survivors. Interestingly, James Cameron used those descriptions to create the look of the iceberg used in his 1997 film. That iceberg looks quite a bit like the iceberg in the Rehorek photo -- despite the fact that the photo wasn't found until 2000.

Consequently, we don't know the shape of the iceberg and what portions fell onto the ship. However, we do know what the Titanic collided with the iceberg. That force was massive -- and it likely displaced the iceberg somewhat. The top of the iceberg likely shifted toward the Titanic and ice fell onto the deck.

As for the initial starboard list: I suspect that it was due to the water rushing in. There has always been some mystery as to how it happened. The lower part of the starboard bow is buried under tons of ocean sediment. However, I do think that photographs of the Olympic's collision with the Hawke do reveal some of the properties of what a collision can do to such a ship.

1024px-Olympic_Hawke_collision_damage-930x1234.jpg
 

Jim Currie

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The iceberg in question was described by one AB Scarrott as " it resembled the Rock of Gibraltar looking at it from Europa Point. It looked very much the same shape as that, only much smaller.... As you approach Gibraltar - it seemed that shape. The highest point would be on my right, as it appeared to me."

The following is what it might have looked like in daytime. I believe it was relatively small, and may have tipped over toward the ship as they met, thus depositing ice on the deck. So far south, such a berg would be unstable due to bottom melt.
in the light of day.jpg
 

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