How Much Ice Fell on the Deck?

Andrew

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Oct 25, 2016
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That's good information, thanks Dave.
I realise bergs melt & get smaller after a year at sea, but wasn't aware they get more fragile.
Although I still think it would need a more direct hit than the glancing, sliding impact the Titanic gave it.
We're talking about chunks flying upwards and outwards, after all.
However, I am just playing devils advocate a bit here - I bow to your better knowledge of these things!
 

Scott Mills

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Jul 10, 2008
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That's good information, thanks Dave.
I realise bergs melt & get smaller after a year at sea, but wasn't aware they get more fragile.
Although I still think it would need a more direct hit than the glancing, sliding impact the Titanic gave it.
We're talking about chunks flying upwards and outwards, after all.
However, I am just playing devils advocate a bit here - I bow to your better knowledge of these things!
Andrew, even if we suppose that the only impact Titanic had with the iceberg was Titanic grounding herself on an underwater portion of said berg, ice could have still fallen onto Titanic; and again, remember that Titanic was a 40,000 ton metal object moving at 23 miles per hour. The vibration alone from the impact of a glancing blow, or a grounding, would have broken ice loose.
 
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