How much of the Titanic is buried in the bottom of the Atlantic?


Lilian

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Apr 20, 2012
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Someone has perhaps asked this question before, but I'm too lazy to look around here så ease my curiosity in this thread :) How much of the Titanic is buried under the bottom of the ocean?
 
Mar 12, 2011
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Lillian, to get an idea of how much of Titanic is under the mud, take a look at pictures of her still in the slipway before launch. Notice how high up on the hull the anchors are mounted? Those anchors are almost touching the mud now.
 

Jake Peterson

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Mar 11, 2012
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For some reason, I read this question thinking you meant length-wise? The ship was 882.3 feet. The front end that is in the mud-is that only about 200 feet of intact ship, with the stern being 100 feet of intactness with pieces strewn about?
 

Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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I don't have exact figures but it gives you an idea of the enormity of the ship that when you see it on the bottom of the ocean the way it is, that a vast bulk of it is still hidden from view. And it's also odd to think when watching films like Ghosts Of The Abyss inside the wreck that on the outside of the hull is just tons and tons of silt and mud and gunk!
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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In round figures, the bow is about 50 feet into the mud. The stern is about 35 feet in. The stern hit so hard that the propeller shafts bent upwards almost to G deck. Both main sections of the hull are lying at an angle, so the broken ends are not dug in anywhere as much.
 
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Lilian

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Apr 20, 2012
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Thank you for your answers. It was quite hard for me to picture how much of the ship was under the ocean floor, actually. In the beginning I just thought that the ship was pressed down in itself as it hit the bottom, but then I thought that maybe it didn't and instead had much of it buried under the ocean floor.
 
Mar 12, 2011
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I'm sure the bottom of the ship compressed a bit on impact, especially the stern because it hit so much harder. The bow actually hit the bottom head on at a fairly steep angle, and skid for a distance before coming to rest. The bow rear of the impact area actually bent down at a pretty noticeable angle after the intial impact at the bottom, as you can tell from the mosaics and drawings of the wreck. Keep in mind the bottom of the ship was built to be very structurally strong, with the keel, double bottom and all the bulkheads braced together for strength. Even the stern, badly mangled as it is, is still in remarkably good shape below the level of the watertight bulkheads, its the decks above that are the most deformed.
 

IanMcD

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Jun 9, 2013
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Hopefully one day we can get a better look inside the bow section. It's possible that quite a few things are better preserved there with that part of the ship buried in the mud and with less exposure to the currents.
 
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