How old did you have to be to eat in the First Class Dining Hall

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Marykate Viola

Guest
Hi I'm pretty new here and I'm really sorry if this subject has already been discussed but how old did you have to be to eat in the First Class Dining Hall with the adults? Were children allowed to eat in there with their parents?
Thank you!!!
 

Matt Smith

Member
Sep 23, 2002
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Ya, they could eat with there parents but I think somebody said that they had to be like 10 or 11 years old.

Matt
 
Dec 6, 2000
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In part a 1st Class Fares Rate booklet reads:
"Children are not entitled to seats in the Saloon unless a full fare is paid".
To that I would add for the fare itself it is stated that: "Two children each under Ten Years, One Full Fare".
In 1912 a child was anyone aged from 1 year to under 12 years.

For Cunard the entry reads: "Children under ten years of age are not entitled to Seats in the Saloon when booked at half fare."

I hope that helps,
Lester
 
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mike disch

Guest
This is slightly off-point, but maybe of interest.
Mr. Joseph LaRoche, the only Haitian passenger on the ship, was previously booked 1st Class on the Le France (Cunard ??) which did not allow adults and children to dine together. As this was important to him, he switched to a 2nd Class Ticket on Titanic.
The full-fare half-fare issue is new to me.
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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It was the policy of the French Line that children were expected to take meals in a nursery, and a policy possibly of the French authorities that babes in arms should not travel at all. According to Judith Geller, Maude Van Billiard managed to get all four of her children aboard a French ship (on the first leg of their journey home from Africa) only by hiding the youngest under her cape while husband Austin distracted the boarding officer.
 
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Daniel Ehlers

Guest
Well, I have the "Titanic Collection" and in it is a copy of the 1910 White Star Line "Notes for First Class Passengers" booklet. It says, "When the steamers are not full in the First Class, children will be allowed to sit with their parents in the Saloon for meals." Considering that, onboard Titanic, first class was not full and there were only seven children to begin with, I'd assume that the older ones who could behave themselves would be able to dine with their parents. Aside from that, I think children were allowed in the cafes, since an excerpt from "Titanic: An Illustrated History" says that Loraine Alison and other children would play in there... But being that the cafes didn't serve meals, perhaps smaller children would be brought food to their cabins by stewards?

Just my two cents, of course...
 

Bob Godfrey

Member
Nov 22, 2002
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It might be best if we returned to the original thread in which this subject has been covered in more detail ('Titanic's babies'). A while back I made the same point about the 1910 booklet, but Lester has a later edition which does not mention this provision - this suggests a change of policy in line with Cunard. Certainly the children in First Class took their meals in the main dining saloon, but generally at an earlier sitting than the adults.