How smooth was Titanic really?


Aly Jones

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Just Finished watching a Titanic doco, and within it was a small clip of Edith Brown Haisman (she sailed in 2nd class) She mentions Titanic was going really fast and the vibrations were quiet terrible.

How smooth was Titanic really?
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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That's a good question as I have wondered about that myself. I've read that she was smoother than Lusitania and Mauritania but not sure about that. My ship couldn't run at full battle speed for more than 40 mins or so because she shook so bad equipment would start coming apart. She was converted from a straight deck carrier to an angled deck and something was just not quite right with her balance or so I was told. But I guess it was good enough because she was in service for almost 50 years. What I remember reading somewhere was that Lusitania and Mauritania at full speed had sort of a higher frequency vibration and whine that some passengers found annoying.
 
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Mar 22, 2003
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I was on the USS Enterprise when she was taken out of Norfolk to her ops area many years ago during a family day exercise. On the way out she was put at flank speed for very short period of time. Oh yes, the vibration and shaking were very noticeable, as was the seas that broke spray as high as the hanger deck. It was a family weekend and the skipper wanted to show her off a bit.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Sam-
This is another area of which I have never had the experiences which you have had.
In my short Naval service ( 4 years active duty + 4 years inactive ready reserve ....and.....only about 2 1/2 years of that was sea duty)none of the ships on which I served never went more than cruising speed so I never had that experience.
But thanks again for one more interesting account.
As a confirmed landlubber, I have learned a lot of interesting things of which I had never heard of before on this website .

Cheers !
Robert

P.S. None of those ships had "family weekends" too.
 
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May 3, 2005
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Which brings up another question.
Was there much rolling on those ships such as Titanic , Olympic and others ?
I have read that the original RMS Queen Mary had a reputation for often frightening rolls.
Also that Queen Mary was later fitted with was I believe were called "Denny Brown
Stabilizers" ?
Did they correct the problem ?

0ne of the old stories that my brother called " family myths and legends* was told by an old Uncle who had returned from a trip to England on
RMS Queen Mary in 1936 or 1937.
He said "The Queen Mary rolled over one night ! "
This might have been on one of those terrible rolls.

Of course the Queen Mary did roll over in the movie "The Poseidon Adventure ".
 

Aly Jones

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I've always wondered if it will feel any different on board moving Olympic class liner VS being on board a moving modern day cruise ship.

Etc... The vibrations differences, noise differences. I wonder if you could hear an Olympic class liner engines during a voyage.

I've never been on a ship before, so I have nothing to go by on.

Surly, both ships must had felt different considering the advancement with technology over the 100 years.

Did the Olympic class liners even have stablizers at all?
 
Mar 22, 2003
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Did the Olympic class liners even have stabilizers at all?
Simple answer, NO. They did, as most other vessels of the period, have bilge keels along their sides which ran from about a point halfway between the 1st and 2nd funnels to about where the 4th funnel was located. These were mounted at the turn of the bilge, and were there to minimize rolling.

But the real factor regarding rolling was what naval architects call the metacenter height of the vessel. A relatively large value means a stiffer ship with more violent and irregular rolls of short periods. Such a vessel has high transverse stability, which means that it wants to return to an even keel when it heels to a side. A small value of metacenter height produces a tender ship of somewhat less stability that rolls more smoothly with longer rolling periods. A tender ship tends to be more comfortable than a stiff one, but it also tends to return to an even keel more slowly when it heels to a side.
 
May 3, 2005
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I've always wondered if it will feel any different on board moving Olympic class liner VS being on board a moving modern day cruise ship.

Etc... The vibrations differences, noise differences. I wonder if you could hear an Olympic class liner engines during a voyage.

I've never been on a ship before, so I have nothing to go by on.

Surly, both ships must had felt different considering the advancement with technology over the 100 years.

Did the Olympic class liners even have stablizers at all?
yla-
My apology for the interruption, but also although I did serve some sea duty on ships in the Navy I don't remember the extremes mentioned on this thread , especially that I don't even remember hearing any noises from the engines on the ships.
So , while following this thread it is almost like yla.....I had never been on a ship before.
Nice to have some experts who have been on ships.
Again. With apologies for the interruption,. Exiting. Back to the reading mode.
 
May 3, 2005
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Simple answer, NO. They did, as most other vessels of the period, have bilge keels along their sides which ran from about a point halfway between the 1st and 2nd funnels to about where the 4th funnel was located. These were mounted at the turn of the bilge, and were there to minimize rolling.

But the real factor regarding rolling was what naval architects call the metacenter height of the vessel. A relatively large value means a stiffer ship with more violent and irregular rolls of short periods. Such a vessel has high transverse stability, which means that it wants to return to an even keel when it heels to a side. A small value of metacenter height produces a tender ship of somewhat less stability that rolls more smoothly with longer rolling periods. A tender ship tends to be more comfortable than a stiff one, but it also tends to return to an even keel more slowly when it heels to a side.
Sam-
Once again the landlubber . :-(
Do you have any photos showing these "bilge keels"? ...."the turn of the bilge" ? .....what they were,where they were and what they looked like ?
I have seen some photos of the "Denny-Brown Stabilizers" on RMS Queen Mary..
I have also read that on RMS Queen Mary part of the problem was the ship was top-heavy. ?
Were they any thing like the "bilge keels" ?
With apologies again for the ignorance, but maybe this would make this clearer for landlubbers like yla and myself. LOL
 
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Aristide

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I've always wondered if it will feel any different on board moving Olympic class liner VS being on board a moving modern day cruise ship.

Etc... The vibrations differences, noise differences. I wonder if you could hear an Olympic class liner engines during a voyage.

I've never been on a ship before, so I have nothing to go by on.

Surly, both ships must had felt different considering the advancement with technology over the 100 years.

Did the Olympic class liners even have stablizers at all?
You can hear ships engines today even on the newest ones. I was on several cruise ships as a kid and teenager and those were top modern ones like Costa Diadema in 2014. So i can tell you you feel vibrations but not very bad. At the stern area you feel it more because its closer to engine room.

What you do feel alot though is, when they use the bow thrusters. That lets the entire ship vibrate.
 

Aly Jones

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yla-
My apology for the interruption, but also although I did serve some sea duty on ships in the Navy I don't remember the extremes mentioned on this thread , especially that I don't even remember hearing any noises from the engines on the ships.
So , while following this thread it is almost like yla.....I had never been on a ship before.
Nice to have some experts who have been on ships.
Again. With apologies for the interruption,. Exiting. Back to the reading mode.
Not a problem. Anyone is allowed to make a comment on my thread. The more the mereia.

I'm really interested in how technology has changed in over the past 100 years. And just maybe, titanic has a one up on cruise ships.
 

Tim Gerard

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I've still noticed engine vibrations on modern cruise ships in the main dining rooms, which are almost always back aft on a lower deck. I remember being surprised at how much I felt the engines on the Celebrity Galaxy (launched in 1996, now called the Marella Explorer). When on the Galaxy and seeing how much I could feel the engines, I remember wondering about the 3rd class women on the Titanic who would've been berthed on the lower decks aft, closest to the propellers.
 

Aly Jones

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Tim, I've read that one survivor took a cruise in 1990, I wonder if that cruise liner felt any difference from titanic? But they never mentioned how difference it was from titanic. But only they will know the answer to that, so we will never know

You would think modern cruise liners would be alot smoother than that.
 

Tim Gerard

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Aly, in my personal experience from having taken several cruise vacations, the newer ones with azipod propulsion are significantly smoother. Ships like Carnival Miracle or Voyager od the Seas, you can notice how much less engine vibration you feel compared to Celebrity Galaxy that did not have azipods. Compared to Titanic, newer cruise ships, even the Galaxy, I'd expect to be smoother. They're always researching ways to reduce engine vibrations felt throughout the ship.

They mostly all also have extendable/retractable stabilizers to help reduce rolling in rough seas, so from that perspective modern cruise ships probably would offer a smoother ride than the Titanic would have.
 

Aly Jones

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OK. The passengers of titanic wouldn't know any better, titanic was the best you could get in luxury in 1912. But we would feel the difference on titanic?
 

Tim Gerard

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I think you and me would be able to tell the difference in vibrations and motion if we could sail on the Titanic vs something like Oasis of the Seas or Diamond Princess. But you're right, for 1912 the Titanic and Olympic was the best you could get.
 
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