How strongly religious were the officers?

Sarah S

Member
Hello there,

I have read somehwere that all officers were christians with some differences here and there. But how strong was their belief in God?
I only know that Lightoller and Lowe have for 100% certainty been profoundly involved with their religion (Lightoller being part of christian scientist while Lowe was known to be a practising believer.)

How about the rest of the officers: Pitman, Boxhall, Moody, Murdoch, Wilde and Captain? Did they personally hold much value and serious belief for their religion, or was it just a case of "being born within that religion, but it does not play a significant role in my life"?



Kind regards
:)
 
I think with the exception of Harry Wilde and William Murdoch, they were all Anglicans.

Wilde was born a Congregationalist and Murdoch was born a *Presbyterian.

Charles Lightoller was a fervent believer in Christian Science during the early 20th Century but it's thought he may have moved away from it by the late thirties or early forties.

Herbert Pitman does not seem to have been a churchgoer but he did believe in God. Pitman was a **Freemason and to become one, a candidate must profess a belief in God or a "Supreme Being"

Harold Lowe certainly had a powerful belief in God and the Christian faith. He was a regular churchgoer and eventually became a warden of his local church.

A lot of James Moody's family were very devout "High Church" Anglicans, but I don't know if he was the same.

*Married his wife in an Anglican ceremony, however.
** Lowe also became a Mason some years after the disaster.
 
I think with the exception of Harry Wilde and William Murdoch, they were all Anglicans.

Wilde was born a Congregationalist and Murdoch was born a *Presbyterian.

Charles Lightoller was a fervent believer in Christian Science during the early 20th Century but it's thought he may have moved away from it by the late thirties or early forties.

Herbert Pitman does not seem to have been a churchgoer but he did believe in God. Pitman was a **Freemason and to become one, a candidate must profess a belief in God or a "Supreme Being"

Harold Lowe certainly had a powerful belief in God and the Christian faith. He was a regular churchgoer and eventually became a warden of his local church.

A lot of James Moody's family were very devout "High Church" Anglicans, but I don't know if he was the same.

*Married his wife in an Anglican ceremony, however.
** Lowe also became a Mason some years after the disaster.

thank you for the reply :)
Sad that not much is known about Officer Moody's relationship with religion and faith. I wonder if maybe his letters could give away something of that sort. Maybe anyone knows this.
 
Clergy members of all faiths tried to convert the old religious experience into new forms so that their words of encouragement and consolation corresponded to what the soldiers experienced at the front. As far as I know, some of the most active were priests who served in the British army ranks. I am an officer, and many faithful soldiers are in my grades. When they need to go to church [religious link removed] I always release them from all duties because religion comes first. Nothing is more important than praying today to see the dawn again tomorrow.
 
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