How the Titanic Became "Unsinkable"

Dec 2, 2000
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>>Mike: 4,754 posts! Will you let me catch up! <<

4,758 with this one and It took me two years and assorted months to get this far. Good to hear you're working on yet another book. Hopefully, the Olympic will get more of the attention she deserves.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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As you can see, the statement in that article about the Cedric is that due to its 9 watertight compartments, it was "practically unsinkable". That word 'practically' makes the phrase just a figure of speech to denote how safe the ship was supposed to be in comparison with its predecessors and most contemporaries.

For example, we all use the phrase "it is practically next door" to denote something that is quite close. It might be 20 miles away from the point of reference but that distance might be considered very close if one is looking at the bigger picture of that situation.
 
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Mike Spooner

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Jan 31, 2018
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Yes the key word was practically as used by H&W who knew no ship is unsinkable. Too easy for the press media to drop that word to sell more newspapers!
 
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Arun Vajpey

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That's right. Tabloids of those days were no better - probably worse - the present day ones to distort news for better sales figures.
 
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Mike Spooner

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What would be interesting to know if the bulkheads were capped off to prevent the water over spilling from bulkhead to the next. Would that of stopped the sinking of the ship? In other words the weight of water against buoyancy.
 
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