How were the officers perceived by passengers after disaster?


Aly Jones

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It has been reported that when lightoller was saving English soldiers at Dunkirk, one English soldier realised who lightoller was. He made a joke about being a lot safer by jumping over board to swim the rest of the way back to England, then to stay on board with him.
Do you think transatlantic passengers thought the same way?
 
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Georges Guay

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From “The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill” by James C. Humes:
Late in his life, Sir Winston took a cruise on an Italian ship. A journalist from a New York newspaper approached the former prime minister to ask him why he chose to travel on an Italian line when the Queen Elizabeth under the British flag was available.

Churchill gave the question his consideration and then gravely replied: “There are three things I like about Italian ships. First, their cuisine, which is unsurpassed. Second, their service, which is quite superb. And then — in time of emergency — there is none of this nonsense about women and children first.”
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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From “The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill” by James C. Humes:
Late in his life, Sir Winston took a cruise on an Italian ship. A journalist from a New York newspaper approached the former prime minister to ask him why he chose to travel on an Italian line when the Queen Elizabeth under the British flag was available.

Churchill gave the question his consideration and then gravely replied: “There are three things I like about Italian ships. First, their cuisine, which is unsurpassed. Second, their service, which is quite superb. And then — in time of emergency — there is none of this nonsense about women and children first.”
I need to read that book. Winston Churchill had some good ones. My favorite was when an uppity women told him at dinner party that "If you were my husband I'd put poison in your drink" His reply..."Madam if you were my wife I'd drink it". Classic.
 
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Aly Jones

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From “The Wit and Wisdom of Winston Churchill” by James C. Humes:
Late in his life, Sir Winston took a cruise on an Italian ship. A journalist from a New York newspaper approached the former prime minister to ask him why he chose to travel on an Italian line when the Queen Elizabeth under the British flag was available.

Churchill gave the question his consideration and then gravely replied: “There are three things I like about Italian ships. First, their cuisine, which is unsurpassed. Second, their service, which is quite superb. And then — in time of emergency — there is none of this nonsense about women and children first.”
Thank you.

By the 1930's,1950's there wouldn't be women and children first policy on English ships and there were enough lifeboats for everyone.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Winston Churchill had some good ones. My favorite was when an uppity women told him at dinner party that "If you were my husband I'd put poison in your drink" His reply..."Madam if you were my wife I'd drink it". Classic.

Unless I am mistaken, that uppity lady was Lady Nancy Astor, the American born British politician and the very first female Conservative Party MP. Churchill and she are supposed to have sparred on more than one occasion.

As for Lightoller's actions during WW1 and subsequently in the Dunkirk evacuation of WW" are certainly highly commendable but have to be taken in the right perspective. There were thousands of ordinary Brits who risked their lives helping with ferrying soldiers and sailors across the channel. Lightoller was just one of them. That is completely irrelevant to his persona during and after the Titanic disaster.
 
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Stephen Carey

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I don't know the answer to this question. Having spent 18 years of my life at sea and risen to the rank of Chief Engineer in the British Merchant Navy, what I can say is that in none of the engineering or deck officer training was anything taught about how to be a hero...
In times of emergency throughout 2 world wars, generally the British Merchant seaman acquitted himself well, as did passengers on many occasions.
When things go wrong, those that know the ship well, generally know what to do in an emergency. Fire and boat drills are mandatory and usually well practiced.
It's interesting to note that with the Oceanis sinking, the one who took charge after the crew left the ship was a British guitarist from the band... Churchill's comment in another post rings true in the case of Costa Concordia and various others...
 
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Unless I am mistaken, that uppity lady was Lady Nancy Astor, the American born British politician and the very first female Conservative Party MP. Churchill and she are supposed to have sparred on more than one occasion.

As for Lightoller's actions during WW1 and subsequently in the Dunkirk evacuation of WW" are certainly highly commendable but have to be taken in the right perspective. There were thousands of ordinary Brits who risked their lives helping with ferrying soldiers and sailors across the channel. Lightoller was just one of them. That is completely irrelevant to his persona during and after the Titanic disaster.
That could very well have been her. I saw a documentary about the women like her who were married off by their uber rich fathers in order to get a title in the family. Many of the british estate owners married them to get their money to save their crumbling estates. Supposedly many of the marriages didn't work out to well because the american women didn't get along with the silly british customs of the times and there was a lot of affairs going on. But if it was her she must have done something right to get elected to parliament.
 
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