Question How were tickets to sail on the Titanic sold?


Jane Himmel

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Mar 27, 2019
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I have a family story passed down that my great-aunt booked passage, but cancelled. I'm assuming there would be no records of people who booked and later cancelled, but it made me wonder if tickets were even assigned to the individual at that time or if they just sold tickets and then took the names for the first time upon boarding. I have evidence she booked passage for a later ship in 1920, but sent her sister in her place.
 
Jul 4, 2020
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i know there is a video on you tube where people in irland paid for their tickets weekly, someone use to come round and colllect the money each week it was the only way most 3ed class people could aford a ticket
 
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Nov 14, 2005
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i know there is a video on you tube where people in irland paid for their tickets weekly, someone use to come round and colllect the money each week it was the only way most 3ed class people could aford a ticket
.I will have to go look for that video. I never heard of that before. Interesting. I've seen tickets of various liners during that time that showed they were bought thru a ticket office that charged a commission.
 

Thomas Krom

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Nov 22, 2017
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In the Late-Victorian and Edwardian era to buy a ticket for any liner you would need to go to a respective office or agent that served the company. You would tell them:

“I would like to buy a ticket for the RMS Oceanic for her next westbound voyage to the United States for one single voyage.”

Or the clerk or agent would ask you comparable questions:

“What is your destination?”, “Single or return?”, “Travel companions or are you traveling alone?”



If everything was arranged you would have signed a passenger contract where you would agree with the terms of the company on-board and you would pay for your ticket. Of the 1317 people on-board the Titanic there were 1304 people who either had to step to these offices/agents themselves to buy a ticket. 13 people on-board had a complimentary ticket, these were as followed:

The Harland and Wolff guarantee group members:

In first class:

  • Thomas Andrews Jr: Master-shipbuilder of the Olympic class liners
  • Roderick Chisholm: Chief draughtsman of the drawing offices of Harland and Wolff
  • William Henry Marsh Parr: assistant manager of the electrical works of Harland and Wolff
In second class:
  • William Campbell: Joiner’s apprentice
  • Alfred Fleming Cunningham: Engine fitter apprentice
  • Antony Wood Frost: Outside foreman of the engine works of Harland and Wolff
  • Robert Knight: Leading hand engineer of the engine works of Harland and Wolff
  • Francis Parkes: Plumber apprentice
  • Ennis Hastings Watson: Electrician apprentice
Mr. Ismay and his personal staff (all traveled in first class)
  • Joseph Bruce Ismay: Chairman of the White Star Line
  • William Henry Harrison (not to be confused with the nineth president of the United States): Mr. Ismay’s personal secretary.
  • Richard Fry: Mr. Ismay’s personal manservant
And lastly:

Johan George Reuchlin: One of the sons of the founder and also a managing director of the Holland America Line.

Except for Mr. Ismay all men were lost.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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Linda not sure which video your referring to as I found a lot of them. But in this one around the 10 min mark they talk about the tickets. I knew they had it rough during those times but I didn't realize how bad it was. Said it took an average of 3 years to save up the 7 pounds for a ticket for the poorer immigrants. No wonder half of the country fled. Cheers.
 
Jul 26, 2021
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chile
Leí en alguna parte que J. Bruce Ismay también invitó a la familia Hays. y que solo habían pagado el equipaje. Incluso la Sra. Hays no quiso hacer reclamos compensatorios por su estatus.
 

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Mike Spooner

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Sep 21, 2017
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In the Late-Victorian and Edwardian era to buy a ticket for any liner you would need to go to a respective office or agent that served the company. You would tell them:

“I would like to buy a ticket for the RMS Oceanic for her next westbound voyage to the United States for one single voyage.”

Or the clerk or agent would ask you comparable questions:

“What is your destination?”, “Single or return?”, “Travel companions or are you traveling alone?”



If everything was arranged you would have signed a passenger contract where you would agree with the terms of the company on-board and you would pay for your ticket. Of the 1317 people on-board the Titanic there were 1304 people who either had to step to these offices/agents themselves to buy a ticket. 13 people on-board had a complimentary ticket, these were as followed:

The Harland and Wolff guarantee group members:

In first class:

  • Thomas Andrews Jr: Master-shipbuilder of the Olympic class liners
  • Roderick Chisholm: Chief draughtsman of the drawing offices of Harland and Wolff
  • William Henry Marsh Parr: assistant manager of the electrical works of Harland and Wolff
In second class:
  • William Campbell: Joiner’s apprentice
  • Alfred Fleming Cunningham: Engine fitter apprentice
  • Antony Wood Frost: Outside foreman of the engine works of Harland and Wolff
  • Robert Knight: Leading hand engineer of the engine works of Harland and Wolff
  • Francis Parkes: Plumber apprentice
  • Ennis Hastings Watson: Electrician apprentice
Mr. Ismay and his personal staff (all traveled in first class)
  • Joseph Bruce Ismay: Chairman of the White Star Line
  • William Henry Harrison (not to be confused with the nineth president of the United States): Mr. Ismay’s personal secretary.
  • Richard Fry: Mr. Ismay’s personal manservant
And lastly:

Johan George Reuchlin: One of the sons of the founder and also a managing director of the Holland America Line.

Except for Mr. Ismay all men were lost.
Did Mr B Ismay and his secretary have tickets and can be proved to?
 

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