Hull paint

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Aaron_2016

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Does anyone know how resilient the hull paint was and how much would have been removed during her maiden voyage? If she had survived the iceberg impact and steamed through the ice field would there be noticeable patches of paint missing as she approached New York?


Looking at photos of the Olympic's maiden voyage it appears the waves have washed away patches of paint and have revealed her original 'white launch paint' underneath. She also appears to have crashed into or brushed against the pier which has scratched off a considerable strip of her paint. Was that an accident or a common occurrence on ships?




paint01.PNG


paint1.PNG




Also is that Ismay and Captain Smith on the bridge?



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Harland Duzen

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I never noticed those two figures before, however, it's also possible that could be New York's Harbour Pilot (If such a role existed). If not, good find! Ismay would't have been pleased.

Actually, if Ismay is the figure in that photo, it shows he did have a tendency to enter the bridge, something he denied in the enquires.

Is it also possible Murdoch or Lightoller is in one of these photos? I heard protocol meant they had to stand at the bow's forward end to act as a lookout.
 

Dave Gittins

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I doubt if it's Ismay. Ismay was 6' 4" tall and towered over Smith.

Ir could well be a pilot, as pilotage was compulsory.
 

Harland Duzen

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In response, it possible Smith is standing on the bridge's step up to see over the edge. your proberly right.
 
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Aaron_2016

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Looking at photos it appears the ship brushes against the pier / jetty. The Captain appears on the footplate and then steps away and walks towards the bridge, but then suddenly the man with the bowler hat on the bridge wing appears to see the imminent impact and approaches the Captain quickly and both men then walk up to the footplate and look over the side just as the ship makes contact and the paint rubs off the hull.



Olympicberth.PNG


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Not sure who the 2 men dressed in white uniforms are on the bow. There are 2 more on the stern. Could they be the ship's officers?


Here are various angles.

bow01.PNG

bow02.PNG



stern1.PNG



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May 3, 2005
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Interesting pictures, thanks Aaron !
Quite a bit of detail.
Stern seems to be riding in lower in water, bow higher . Or just an optical illusion ?
Seems to be a lot of paint scratched off.
Also two of the men at the pier seem to be bent over looking at something.
 
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Harland Duzen

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Not sure who the 2 men dressed in white uniforms are on the bow. There are 2 more on the stern. Could they be the ship's officers?


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As this happened in June, and White Star Line states the officers and Captains uniform wore white uniforms during Summer, it is likely the officers. as Murdoch was (originally) Chief Officer and then on the bridge, then Lightoller who was (originally) first Officer is then the man at the bow.
Olympic-Capt-Smith-2.jpg
 
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Aaron_2016

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Thanks. They do appear to be the ship's officers. Here is a photo of the Mauretania arriving in New York after completing her maiden voyage. There is a significant amount of hull paint washed away by the waves.


Mauretania.jpg


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TitanicNerd

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Jan 18, 2014
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So I look in Titanic pictures I can tell a little bit of the water line is visible the whole way of the ship, but how much feet tall is the sliver of the waterline above the water? Is a sliver or is it actually big? And what color is the water line???? :confused:
 
May 3, 2005
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Thanks again, Aaron
One of the things about this website is learning something new.
I had never heard of paint being washed off like that.
Was this something common with ship's paints at that time ?
 
May 3, 2005
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Same in at least the U.S. Navy. "Blues" in the winter ; "Whites" in the summer. CPO's and Officers did wear khakis in the summer.
Speaking of enlistmen's uniforms, the "summer whites" were a lot more comfortable and practical than the old traditional "dress blues"....at least in this person's "IMHO". LOL.
 
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Jim Currie

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Don't know what picture you are looking at but you are describing what is called a 'boot-topping line'. As far as I know, Titanic did not have one. The underwater part of her hull was painted in a red-anti-fouling paint. This was continued above the light dispalcement level to where it met the black part of the hull paint.

Jim C.
 

TitanicNerd

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Don't know what picture you are looking at but you are describing what is called a 'boot-topping line'. As far as I know, Titanic did not have one. The underwater part of her hull was painted in a red-anti-fouling paint. This was continued above the light displacement level to where it met the black part of the hull paint.

Jim C.
So you could see a little sliver the whole way of the ship? Just a little? This is the picture I am looking at:
 

TimTurner

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Dec 11, 2012
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You could probably see about 3 to 6 feet of the red paint all the way along the side. I'd have to look around to find the exact width in feet.

I don't think the "water line" was painted on the ship. The water line would change based on how loaded the ship was. A ship with no passengers, cargo, or coal would ride pretty high in the water. A heavily loaded ship would ride lower in the water. The purpose of the red paint is not primarily to show where the water should be. I believe its purpose is to prevent barnacles and things from sticking to the ship (anti-fouling paint). As such, you'd want it to be slightly above the water's usual level, so the paint would do its job even if the water lapped up a bit high.

For proportion, each of those rows of portholes in that picture are about 9 feet apart.
 

Jim Currie

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You're right Tim. There was no Boot-topping line.

we can get a fair idea of the exposed anti-fouling depth from th details of the RMS Olympic. Her light draft was 27'10.5" and her loaded draft was about 34'07". The amount of anti-fouling showing at light draft would be the difference between these two...6'08.5" or thereabouts. Titanic would be an inch or two more.

It is highly unlikely that the anti-fouling would be carried above the load waterline. It worked on the basis of chemical release when submerged in salt water and was ineffective in air. It was also extemely expensive stuff.

Jim C.