Hymns Played On Titanic


Dave Hudson

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William,
I would IMMENSLY apriciate it if you could tell me how to get the soudtrack to Raise the Titanic (a fantastic score).
Obligingly,
David
 
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Jane Green

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Yes, I also remember the haunting melody from Raise The Titanic: it is simply beautiful, and strangely moving.
 
May 5, 2001
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I would IMMENSLY apriciate it if you could tell me how to get the soudtrack to Raise the Titanic (a fantastic score).
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Hello David, sorry for the delay in responding but life has been hectic the last few days, I found RAISE THE TITANIC in a store called TOTWER RECORDS in Paramus, New Jersey, I do believe you can get it @ CDNOW.COM if you search there or any popular record chain may have it.....I found it, at the time, I believe on a fluke chance but it could be more widespread now.......good luck!
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Yes, I also remember the haunting melody from Raise The Titanic: it is simply beautiful, and strangely moving.

Hello again Jane, you know funny thing about this soundtrack but when I went to the theater the day it opened, from the first notes of the main title, I knew I had to have it and was disappointed when they never put one out until just a couple of years ago when Titanic fever was still high......all of the music is there, I listen to it alot....

Talk to you again soon,
Bill
 

david wilson

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Hi - I did some research sometime ago into the hymn tune 'Autumn' I managed to find a copy of it in a music library, and the meter did fit 'Nearer my God' I often wondered if the 'Autumn' which Harold Bride heard, was the hymn tune as used in the States, but not in the U.K and Nearer My God was also played as well.? Any thoughts any one?
David Wilson
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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David, you must have found yet another tune called Autumn. The one published after the disaster by The New York Times doesn't fit NMGTT at all. It all adds to the fun!

So far, various people have turned up something like nine or ten tunes used for NMGTT. It's all madly confusing. Even the American tune Bethany used to be sung in two different rhythms in 1912.

My own personal theory is that they played the American tune and that the British knew it well because it had been taken to Britain by visiting American evangelists before 1900. A monument in Australia is engraved with the American tune and if we knew it, so did the British.

I discount Bride's account. He's one of the worst witnesses, even on things that were part of his job, but let's not go into that.
 

Lee Gilliland

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I got my score from Raise the Titanic off Amazon.com.

My personal take on the last thing the band played is Vivaldi's Autumn from his The Seasons - it's a standard, so they wouldn't need a score, it can be played on the instruments they had, and it's a very soothing thing to hear.
 

Dave Gittins

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In 1912 they were lucky. Vivaldi's war horse was not known and can be ruled out. Personally, I hate the piece, along with the rest of his stereotyped output.

Other pieces called Autumn have been dragged into the musical catfight at times, including one by Cecile Chaminade. There must be dozens of others. There's even ballet music by Verdi. As it all hangs on Bride's story, I discount them all.
 

Lee Gilliland

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Vivaldi's "war horse", The Four Seasons, is currently available on CD and played with fair regularity on the local classical music station. I find it amazing that it should have been unknown in 1912, but even more amazing that it should make a comeback from such oblivion. Could you possibly be mistaken? I'm also quite curious about why you find Bride such an implausible witness.
 

Bob Godfrey

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'The Four Seasons' has a good claim to being the most recorded of all classical works, but it really did make a comeback from oblivion. Though popular in his own time, Vivaldi died a pauper and was quickly fogotten until his works were rediscovered in the 1950s. As Dave said, in 1912 his music was unknown.
 

Dave Gittins

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Lee, without going into details on what is really the wrong thread, I find Bride unreliable on several grounds. Among them are his various versions of the death of Phillips, different versions of the fight with the stoker, different timings of the "shut up" exchange with Frankfurt and other inconsistencies.

As to Vivaldi, I might add that in 1912 very little baroque music was played at all. Even Handel and Bach were represented in concerts by a few works, often in a very mangled form. Even after 1950, some weird things were heard, such as Messiah with full modern orchestra, complete with two harps.
 

Lee Gilliland

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I must admit I have wondered about Phillips' death, as I know I've seen at least two completely different versions, both Bride's.
 

Bob Godfrey

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I see no reason to doubt that at some stage of the proceedings Bride heard the band playing 'Autumn' or something which, to his ear and possibly heard in snatches, sounded like it. As for the identity of Bride's 'Autumn', I know this has been endlessly argued in other threads but the man was not a musician and, like any layman, would surely have specified a hymn by reference to the words rather than the music.

So my vote goes with Walter Lord and the pop 'Songe d'Automne'. But was it the LAST piece played? Like Dave, I set no store on Bride's recollection of the timing of events. While Phillips was occupied in the Silent Room Bride made several trips to the bridge and had the opportunity to hear snatches of music during any one of them, long before the band reached their elusive last performance.
 

Lee Gilliland

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Actually, it's always possible that they didn't play anything named "Autumn" at all, that it was just running around in his head like some songs you have heard too often - if I start a chorus of "It's a Small World" how many people will hear that for a day or two?
 
Apr 11, 2001
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Bob- I agree with you that people seldom refer to hymns by their tune name. However I have noticed that the Brits are far better versed in hymn tune names than Americans- who, except for maybe knowing the tune to "The Old One Hundredth" are clueless about tune names. I attribute this to the C of E Hymnal Ancient and Modern, where the lyrics are included, and the hymn tune name and the bare bones of the tune. American hymnals are pages and pages of SATB and accompaniment- often having several tunes to the same text! I sang in many British Cathedral choirs back in 1995 and was no end impressed when the choirmaster would say "Jerusalem"- or "Hyfrydol" and the gang would belt it right out! Over here the singers would look blankly into space by and large.I too think Autumn was Songe d'Automne- not knowing if Bride was comfortable with French- he indeed would have used the English translation. I understand it was a very popular tune. I don't know why- sounds rather mournful to me- hardly Zippity Do-Da!
 

Bob Godfrey

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Hi, Shelley. I'm sure you're right that Brit choristers know their music, but (too many!) years of experience listening to both my own and older generations struggling to cope with the vocal demands of weddings and funerals convinces me that nobody else does. Maybe Bride did have some experience with a church choir? - to be honest I don't know.

Certainly he would have used the name Autumn for the waltz tune, which was rarely given its full name and was in the repertoire of many ship's bands at that time. I'd call it sombre and restful rather than mournful - a very suitable accompaniment for the contemplation of eternity. Nevertheless, I reckon old Wallace DID play Nearer my God at the eleventh hour. That's what HE would have wanted, and who among us would begrudge him a final moment of well deserved self-indulgence?
 
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Lynda Franklin

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I have often wondered which hymns in the catholic masses would have been sung if any.It should be noted that the catholic church would have had, more than likely would be in latin and there are songs that are performed as such I will have to go look at some titles if any cares .
 
May 17, 2006
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Dear Lynda,
NOT to be a hymn grinch but given my experience growing up with the 'old' Latin Mass and given that it was celebrated most likely as a 'low Mass' on the ship with minimum in the way of Catholic hymn books etc. MY GUESS is that the priest came out, celebrated the Mass in the classic mode of the time ie in silence and after the final "Ite Missa est" and "Deo Gracias" left the altar and that was that. No Palestrina or Gregorian chant here MOST LIKELY nor any "Holy God we Praise Thy Name" unless the priest or some congregant was particularly precocious!!!!! I could be wrong!!! Happy New Year, Barry Blackburn
 
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Lynda Franklin

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NOT to be a hymn grinch but given my experience growing up with the 'old' Latin Mass and given that it was celebrated most likely as a 'low Mass' on the ship with minimum in the way of Catholic hymn books etc. MY GUESS is that the priest came out, celebrated the Mass in the classic mode of the time ie in silence and after the final "Ite Missa est" and "Deo Gracias" left the altar and that was that. No Palestrina or Gregorian chant here MOST LIKELY nor any "Holy God we Praise Thy Name" unless the priest or some congregant was particularly precocious!!!!! I could be wrong!!! Happy New Year, Barry Blackburn

Boy do I feel llike a dope I realized my own error after I posted .I was thinking of the catholic chruch that I usually attend where hymns are sung,D'Oh not the old latin and how it would have been done . Embrassed.You could be right but in the abense of any info we won't know.Since no catholic passengers felt the need to say anything.
 

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