I can't make out this line in ANTR


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Paul Lee

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Aug 11, 2003
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In the film, Captain Smith and the QM are talking about the failure of the rcokets to attract attention. At this point the QM says "I think the master must be asleep", but my girlfriend thinks he really says "I think the b_____d must be asleep" (sorry for the dashes Phil!). Which is right?

Best wishes

Paul

 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
If I recall correctly, it was the "b" word that was used. Captain Lord had no ally in Walter Lord.
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Dave Gittins

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Paul, I just checked the film and your girlfriend is correct. I was a bit surprised that the word got past the censors in the 1950s. If you watch closely, you'll see that Captain Smith turns his head towards Rowe, as if he might say something about the sailor's language. He apparently lets it pass.
 

Bob Godfrey

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To be absolutely correct, Rowe's naughty word is plural (the b...s must be asleep), so it didn't single out the Captain. There's an interesting precedent in the film In Which we Serve (1942) which centres on the loss of the destroyer Torrin in the Mediterranean. The script was based on the sinking of the real HMS Kelly, and every effort was made to create a realistic scenario including appropriate nautical language when referring to the enemy!

British wartime audiences were treated to the uncut version, but when the film was released in the US the 'Hays Code' was in force so the B-word had to go. Bearing in mind the mood of the times and the quality of the film, they decided in this case to make a special exception and leave in place a few of the many instances of God, Damn and Hell to shock American audiences. They later expressed regret, as this had 'established a dangerous precedent'. So now we know who's really to blame for the lowering of Hollywood standards - not Quentin Tarantino, but Noel Coward!
 
Jan 7, 2002
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Another line I couldnt underatnd..When Molly Brown was telling an upper crust Briton about how Leadville Johnny cemented silver dollars on the floor of every room, the upper crusty Brit mumbled somthing, but for the life of me I cant understand what he said..

Ditto for the moment in Cameron's Titanic film when Cal Hockley has a chance to enter a lifeboat, but decided to cut through the bridge to get to the port side...


regards


Tarn Stephanos
 

Inger Sheil

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Ditto for the moment in Cameron's Titanic film when Cal Hockley has a chance to enter a lifeboat, but decided to cut through the bridge to get to the port side...
Poor Tarn! Oh, d*** it all to hell!
 
Jun 12, 2004
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If I remember correctly, the upperCREST Englishman simply replied, "really?" Did I forget anything in that?

By the way, Inger, let's not forget Jack's vulgar "horses**t!" when about to be hauled away by Master-at-Arms Bailey. In light of Jack's language, Cal's "Godd**n it all to H*ll!" is really nothing. Imagine how those in the 50s would have reacted to Jack's outburst, hehe.
 

Inger Sheil

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Your comments put me in mind of remarks by Harold WG Lowe on his father's use of 'God d***', during the sinking, Mark. He observed wryly that such usages would hardly raise an eyebrow these days. I suspect there was more to Lowe's language than the odd dicey phrase - one lovely elderly lady who knew him when she was a child in the 30s recalls virtually every other phrase as more or less blue - it made quite an impression on her! Again, though, that was by the standards of a child in the 30s.
 

Inger Sheil

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It's a great scene, Bob! American Stock Sterotype comes head to head with British Stock Stereotype. And you've certainly got the right emphasis on 'ce-mented'...she relishes that word.
 
Feb 24, 2004
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Inger, check out Michael Todd/David Niven's "Around the World in 80 Days" for some truly magnificent stereotyping! Nobody's safe in that one, no matter where they come from.

I've always wondered whether Molly and Elizabeth "Baby" Doe ever met up. Baby was the mistress and later the wife of Horace Tabor, the silver king. Same part of the country and similar wealth (at least for a while), but their notoriety was separated by a number of years.

Roy
 
May 3, 2005
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In the commentary on the ANTR DVD, the commentator remarks that the line was:

"How very tiresome of you to have to keep them polished !"

I would suppose that the commentator must have added the addition himself of "to have to keep them polished" as it is not heard on the regular soundtrack. The comment is made just after the cut is made to the next scene.
 
May 3, 2005
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And that line about "Why do the British have to sound dinner as if it were a cavalry charge ?" is identical - in the 1953 version Clifton Webb says it and Kathy Bates in the 1997.
 
May 3, 2005
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In ANTR :The scene in which Lightoller is retiring for the night in his cabin after having gone off watch and completed making his rounds:

He knocks the picture of Sylvia Lightoller off the nightstand with a pillow, picks it up off the deck and returns it to the nightstand.

Was there supposed to be any particular significance to this scene ?
Something from Lightoller's memoirs ?
Or just an accident that "just happened" during the filming and was left in the movie for human interest?

What would really be interesting would be the complete script of ANTR as is available on another website for the 1997 version. There is just enough shown in the ANTR DVD section with the interview with William Mac Quitty to be tantalizing. (A part of the script is shown - the scene with the young couple and Thomas Andrews in the First Class Smoking Room.)
 
May 3, 2005
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Pardon me ! In the preceding posting I did not mean to infer that "Titanic" (1997) was a "1997 version" of ANTR ! Far from it ! I'm adding this posting to (try to ) stay out of trouble with the ANTR fanatics !
 

Jim Kalafus

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Robert- 'though I have not seen it offered, you might check with some of the companies that sell photocopied scripts, to see if ANTR is offered. They proliferate at shopping mall movie memorabilia sales (you know- the ones where outside dealers set up at the mall and peddle their overpriced goods) and can be found, en masse, in magazines like Movie Collectors' World and the Big Reel.
 
J

Jeffrey Word

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Hello out there!

This question will probably be for the people who are "most familiar" with A Night To Remember. And maybe familiar with the British accent. Well, accent to someone from Texas anyway.
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In the dining room scene that first shows Molly Brown sitting at the table with a few others, she states: "He built me a house, and he had silver dollars cemented all over the floors of every room." Well, the guy she's sitting beside says something in response, but I can't ever understand what he's saying! She says what I quoted above, the guy says something back, she looks at him, and they switch scenes. Just to give anyone a better idea of which scene I am referring to. I've been trying to figure out what he's saying to her since I was 5!!!
If anyone can help it would be most appreciated!
happy.gif


Jeff.
 

Sam Brannigan

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I've always rated the "tiresome" scene as one of my top 5 Titanic movie moments ever.

Brilliantly scripted and delivered, it makes me chuckle every time.

I've always had a notion that the actor playing the English gent is the legendary Kenneth Williams of "Carry On" fame (sorry if I've lost our American friends at this point!).

He's got the same nasal drawl and extraordinary accent. He's not credited on IMDB - if it's not him, it's a dead ringer for him.
 
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