I DIED ON THE TITANIC


Oct 13, 2000
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No matter your views of reincarnation, which is not a proper topic for this board anyway, Barnes' book is complete hogwash. His characters are so two dimensional as to be laughable, especially Ismay. One can almost see him twirling his mustache and leering evily.

Many people have listened to Barnes' tapes of the book and have been impressed by his sincerity of emotion, but if you look at his bio, he is trained in live theater. Remembering a comment from a rather famous Titanic movie the line was "(S)He's an actor, shouldn't that tell you something!" lol.

all the best, Michael (TheManInBlack) T
 
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Jun 11, 2000
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Can we just calm down here, please? Jonathan is interested, but cautious - that's fine. Michael is completely sceptical - and that's fine too. You two falling out - that's not fine. It simply is not worth debating, unless you can both understand each others' viewpoints. I cannot intervene on viewpoints, but only on the way that discussion is conducted. Which, if it comes to it, I will.
 
Oct 13, 2000
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Falling out? I think I missed something. Jonathan asked about Barnes' book, I gave my opinion of it. I didn't mention Jonathan or his comments and as a matter of fact, we seem to basically agree in that he expresses reservations about the book himself.

Now I find a private email from Jonathan saying I have flamed him and am " censorius and bitchy".

I have had a loooong history on this forum, and anyone who have been here any length of time knows that I have never attacked anyone in all those years. Why Jonathan thinks I am attacking him is a complete mystery to me.

For the record I have no animosity towards Jonathan, never had in the first place. If my post was taken as an attack against him, which again I fail to see how, that was not my intent.

all the best, Michael (TheManInBlack) T
 
May 1, 2004
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Pacifique du Nord
I read the book after my post. OMG! If I wrote down every error I found I would have writer's cramp!

There is a lot of attention paid to the quality of the iron used in the hull and also the fragility of the hull itself. That makes the book interesting. Also, the personal details of Andrews's life.

Take out the pathos and some factual info. does remain. A bit like clarifying butter.

What I really found rich was Captain Smith dining w/Andrews and Astor on D deck in the saloon. Whilst he was dining in the restaurant on B deck.

This book must have been privately published. ;`}
 
May 1, 2004
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My bad: I misread Michael's post as saying that the book in question was not a topic for this board, rather than the subject of reincarnation not being the same. I apologize and must see my optician pronto.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I read the book after my post. OMG! If I wrote down every error I found I would have writer's cramp!<<

And that should be a red flag to watch out for anything else the man writes. Regarding the supposed "fragility" of the Titanic's hull and the ever popular "Inferior steel" myth, well, let's just say that one evolved in pure hindsight and hasn't held up well under close examination.

>>Take out the pathos and some factual info. does remain. <<

I'm sure it does, but then if you want to sell a whopper of a lie or a whole pack of them, it's always a good idea to wrap it in a sandgrain of truth. That makes it a lot easier to swallow.

Regards re-incarnation, this has been a very contentious sore spot and the source of some of the most vicious flamewars this forum has ever seen. While such discussions can't really be stopped, they're strongly discouraged. If you must deal with it, all I can say is handle it with extreme caution. (And don't be surprised if the old hands run away from it in droves.)
 
Oct 13, 2000
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Not a problem, Jonathan - don't think twice about it.

Reading the book is quite an eye opening experience, isnt' it! One of my biggest problems with it was the following, which I excerpted from my review:

"The author gifts Thomas Andrews the engineering knowledge of a late twentieth century scientist. The possibility of Titanic’s iron being brittle, the problem of there being too much slag in the rivets, the rudder being too small for the ship, all are theories that have been proposed in recent years. But according to Barnes, Andrews knew all of this back in 1912".

As for reincarnation, it is a personal issue, which is why I made no statements for or against it - everyone must make up their own minds.

best regards, Michael (TheManInBlack) T
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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One thing we can learn from the Barnes tapes is that the spirit of Thomas Andrews was consigned not to Heaven, Hell or Valhalla but to the mythical Scottish village of Brigadoon. How else could an Ulster gentleman, brought up to speak the King's English much as the King would have spoken it, have acquired a broad Hollywood Scots accent in the afterlife. Did ye no ken that Tommy didnae speak like this, Misterr Barrnes? If you have to give the man a joke accent, at least get it from the right side of the Irish Sea.
.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Not to mention the rather startling notion that the shipyard workers called him 'Tommy' in the early 1900s. I think they would have called him "Mr. Andrews, sorr."
 

Bob Godfrey

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I'd say that Andrews was a man of his times who knew that familiarity with the lower ranks did not breed respect. He got that rather from demonstrating a sincere concern for their welfare. But there might have been a few exceptions - the old hands he had once worked under as an apprentice - who perhaps had special dispensation to call him something other than Mr Andrews or Sir. 'Mr Tommy' was a possibility. Domestic servants commonly used that form of address for the younger members of the family 'upstairs'.
 
Oct 21, 2005
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Hello!
I am happy to find this topic. There is something that I may mention here. I was also there on the board of Titanic in my past life but I survived the disaster.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Annamaria,
I make no judgement on this issue, but I do have to tell you that the subject of reincarnation is rather contentious on this Board, and it has led to some considerable argument in the not-so-distant past.

If you have an interest in discussing the factual evidence surrounding the sinking of the Titanic, you will find you are a very welcome new member.
 
Oct 21, 2005
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Dear Monica:
That' s okay! I am absolutely not the person who want to enter into a controversy on the theme 'reincarnation' but I am interested in the tragedy of Titanic so I want to follow the events of the topics. So I want to stay a member in the future, too.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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You're very welcome, Annamaria, and I'm glad you realise that I did not wish to deter you in any way, but only to help you to get the best out of the Board. You'll find virtually everything one could possibly hope to discuss here somewhere. If you have any trouble finding things you are interested in, just ask. Someone will know.
 

Lau Yikwan

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Feb 11, 2008
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Recently,i have been reading the book called ''i died on the titanic''
It's about the author talking about her previous life
She is instructed to come back to her previous life. And she finds herself is called Lucy and located in a super huge ship but she doesn't know the name of the ship. Then the instructor questions if the ship is titanic, so he instructs the author to go back to the date of 14~15/04/1912. She feels extremely cold. And the people are confused and running.
She falls one of her shoes into the cold water and she decides to take it back. However, she is submerged into the cold water and die..

Have you ever read this book?

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally a separate thread in a different subtopic, has been moved to this pre-existing thread discussing the same book. MAB]
 
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Jun 15, 2019
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I also have reasons ("cell memory" actually) to believe that I died on the Titanic. As one psychic discerned I was a third class passenger named Emily Vanderplanke, a 31 year old woman travelling with her husband and brother and sister-in-law. I believe she was either an unnamed body or was never recovered as I cannot find her name on any of the lists. I have had two many conscious "memories" of the ship and phoebias that can be directly related to the disaster. I have two other friends in this life who also feel that they were "there". I am looking for pictures of her, as I already have a biography of her and her family. My e-mail address is [email protected] if anyone wishes to chat with me about this subject.
 
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Cam Houseman

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Jul 14, 2020
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Hey all,
I find this topic quite interesting in that I have done some research on the "Lennons". You see my mother was born and bred in the village where Denis Lennon came from - Ballymahon, Co. Longford. I spend quite alot of time there. The story goes that Denis Lennon found a job as a bar-tender in a pub in a small village called Clarinbridge in Co. Galway. The pub which also had a small shop attached belonged to the Mullin family (who quite the opposite of being downwardly mobile as Fiona said, considered themselves to be upwardly mobile!) Anyway, as the story goes young Denis fell in love with the youngest daughter, Mary Mullin. However, the family highly disapproved of the match. They considered Mary to be of a higher social rank than Denis. The young couple decided to elope to America. They made their escape with Denis saying he was going to visit his sick mother in Ballymahon, while Mary said she was going to visit her aunt. Of course the two made their way to Queenstown in Co. Cork with the intention of boarding the first available ship to the U.S. However, the Mullin family put 2 and 2 together when they found out that Mary never turned up at her aunts. Apparently Mary's eldest brother was sent in pursuit of the young couple - supposedly carrying a loaded gun! From what I can recall the "Lennons" were actually booked on another ship - the "Celtic", I think, but had to be transferred to the "Titanic" when the former ship's voyage was cancelled. The delay in their departure was somewhat unnerving for the young couple who were travelling as Denis and Mary Lennon - giving the impression that they were brother and sister or a newly-married couple. Anyway, on the morning of Thursday, April 11th, 1912 (In other words EXACTLY 90 years ago today!!!) the two boarded the tender out to the "Titanic". Not long after the tender cast off on it's way to Roches Point to meet "Titanic", the delayed train carrying Mary's brother pulled into Queenstown station. He could only watch helplessly as his sister and her lover sailed into the distance never to be seen again. Perhaps it would have been best had be caught up with the two. By the way, Senan Molony, when attempting to identify several people in a photograph of one of the tenders, suggested that a young couple sitting in the stern of the boat were in fact the "Lennons". Denis is the one with his chin on his hand and his arm resting on his knee - he looks fed-up (or worried!), Mary is on his left wearing a hat. I like to think it was them. Sadly the two perished in the disaster. I like to think they were in eachother's arms as they went down. In my opinion they were the real Jack and Rose - overcoming class divides and sacrificing all to be together, come what may. By the way, the man who chauffeured my mother and father on their wedding day (and is still the local taxi-driver despite being in his late 80's) once told me that his father was, as a boy, in the village band and football team with another boy who later died on the "Titanic". Although there were two male victims from Ballymahon - Denis would have been nearer the age of the said man's father. I believe he was the boy in question. I've also seen a group photo of the Ballymahon town band in 1905, unfortunately the men are'nt named. I could but hazzard a guess as to which one may have been Denis. It certainly was the right period for him to have been in the band. I intend to spend today - the 90th anniversary of "Titanic's" call at Queenstown (now Cobh) thnking about the many Irish victims and their many touching stories. Anyway, I hope you find this interesting.
Best wishes,
Richie.
wow!!
 

Cam Houseman

Member
Jul 14, 2020
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I also have reasons ("cell memory" actually) to believe that I died on the Titanic. As one psychic discerned I was a third class passenger named Emily Vanderplanke, a 31 year old woman travelling with her husband and brother and sister-in-law. I believe she was either an unnamed body or was never recovered as I cannot find her name on any of the lists. I have had two many conscious "memories" of the ship and phoebias that can be directly related to the disaster. I have two other friends in this life who also feel that they were "there". I am looking for pictures of her, as I already have a biography of her and her family. My e-mail address is [email protected] if anyone wishes to chat with me about this subject.
fascinating! When I was hm.. maybe 6 or 7, before my Titanic "craze" I had this nightmare I was trapped on a sinking ship, being chased by Wolves! Only nightmare I can remember, from that age.. Weird things come from our subconcious..
 

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