I don't know why but I just LOVE this moment


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May 12, 2009
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This has got to be the only Titanic film that accurately shows Margaret Brown in bed in her cabin at the time of the collision instead of that awful clichéd stereotype of having her gamble the night away in the smoking room; cursing and smoking like a drunken sailor.

....This film has so much richness and excellent scenes, but for some reason, this one small bit of no-nonsense historical accuracy makes me feel all "warm and fuzzy."
 
May 3, 2005
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>>...This film has so much richness and excellent scenes....<<

Just a bit of historic accuracy re ANTR... I would have to go back and view ANTR a bit more closely...but is Mrs. Brown every referred to as "Molly" in ANTR ?
 
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No she isn't.... In fact, she's never properly named, but it's obviously her. Her American dialect, her background from Colorado mining, her actions in lifeboat 6, etc. And this is the only Titanic film to get an actress with an uncanny resemblance to Margaret Brown.
 
But she still portrayed her as a hillbilly in the dinner scene. That's not the way Margaret Brown was at the time of the disaster, which no one really realized (thanks a lot, Meredith Willson).

Margaret Brown was well-spoken, went by Margaret, and accepted in society. She wasn't a rude, loud-mouthed, self-impressed hick.
 
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Yes, the hillbilly bit was a bit tacky, but come to think of it, the film portrayed a LOT of American characters in a bit of a stereo-typical way.

Still, you must admit, "A Night to Remember" has the most restrained version of the Margaret Brown, along with Cameron's film, they're the only films to show her any real respect. For example, the 1996 version was just offensive on so many levels.
 
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>>Margaret Brown was well-spoken, went by Margaret, and accepted in society. She wasn't a rude, loud-mouthed, self-impressed hick.<<

Some reports credit Mrs. Brown as being fluent in several languages and doubtless would not have spoken as portrayed in ANTR.

>>Yes, the hillbilly bit was a bit tacky, but come to think of it, the film portrayed a LOT of American characters in a bit of a stereo-typical way.<<

Another example was the "Hey, Lieutenant !" scene in which Lightoller is stopped by a group of Americans and asked information on the ship's speed for the next day's betting.
 
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Hi, Robert and all!

I'm afraid that, as a Yank, if I tried to portray a British character without being very well scripted and coached, my "version" would likely seem quite stereotypical to them as well. What we all tend to notice are the externals. But goodness, no one speaks with an "accent" - they/we just "speak." Does that make any sense?
 

Arun Vajpey

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Margaret "Molly" Brown's rich hillbilly image is best (or worst, depending on one's point of view) portrayed in the 1964 musical "The Unsinkable Molly Brown". I believe the film was adapted from a Broadway play of the same name. Debbie Reynolds played the title role in the film.
 
May 3, 2005
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Hi Roy and all !

>>I'm afraid that, as a Yank, if I tried to portray a British character without being very well scripted and coached, my "version" would likely seem quite stereotypical to them as well. What we all tend to notice are the externals. But goodness, no one speaks with an "accent" - they/we just "speak." Does that make any sense?<<

My wife says my Winston Churchill impersonation sounds like FDR and vice-versa. Never in the field of human endeavour do we have anything to fear but fear itself. LOL.

Navy Boot Camp was my first experience of a "culture shock"...We had everything from "youse guys" to "y'alls". I'm a native Dallasite,but a fellow "boot" from Tennessee accused me of "you talk like a Yankee." :-(
 
May 3, 2005
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Some critics to the contrary, but I thought Kate Winslet did "The American Accent" quite convincingly. My first impression of her comments on the "extra material" on the DVD that she was "putting on" a fake English accent.

Being from the western side of The Pond and not
knowing if they are genuine, but the "Britcoms" have been an educational experience in British accents...everything from the rural "Mr. Molterd" to the snobbish "Captain Peacock".
 
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>>But she still portrayed her as a hillbilly in the dinner scene. That's not the way Margaret Brown was at the time of the disaster, which no one really realized (thanks a lot, Meredith Willson).<<

Hmmm.....If "ANTR" came out in 1958 and "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" in 1964... so do we have William Mac Quitty, Roy Ward Baker et al to thank a lot ?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>but I thought Kate Winslet did "The American Accent" quite convincingly.<<

Some British actors are quite adept at doing that. If any of you enjoy the re-imagined Battlestar Galactica, lend an ear to Jamie Bamber who played the role of Lee "Apollo" Adama. You would think he's from Philidelphia Pa. rather then Hammersmith London U.K.

I don't know of a lot of American actors who could do as well with any variation of an English accent.
 
May 12, 2009
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>>>>Hmmm.....If "ANTR" came out in 1958 and "The Unsinkable Molly Brown" in 1964... so do we have William Mac Quitty, Roy Ward Baker et al to thank a lot ?<<<<

Well, as I said before, Margaret Brown in "ANTR" is actually quite subtle and demure compared to other portrayals. And the crass appearance of the character seems to have more to do with Europe's perceived notions of "new money" Americans than actual myths about the famous "Molly" Brown.

Also, let's not put all the blame on Meredith Wilson. Gene Fowler was the first one to write humorous (and highly fictional) tall-tales about "Molly Brown," a character only loosely based on her real life counterpart and those stores were never meant to be taken at face value...... But you just don't temp pop-culture!

Poor Mrs. Brown is just another victim of Titanic pop-culture, along with the tragic J. Bruce Ismay and poor Alice Cleaver.

LOL... But just veered WAAAAAAY off topic.
 

Arun Vajpey

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>>>>> And the crass appearance of the character seems to have more to do with Europe's perceived notions of "new money" Americans than actual myths about the famous "Molly" Brown. <<<<<<

Perhaps. But by the same token, some of the American perceptions of Europeans, especially the British, tended to be equally amusing.
 
>> If "ANTR" came out in 1958 and "The Unsinkable
>> Molly Brown" in 1964... so do we have William
>> Mac Quitty, Roy Ward Baker et al to thank a lot ?

The film version of stage musical called The Unsinkable Molly Brown was made in 1964. The original stage musical The Unsinkable Molly Brown, which was the source material for the film, opened on Broadway in 1960. It was no doubt being written at the time that ANTR was being filmed.

I think that we have the legends of the sinking that sprung up in newspapers to thank for Brown being portrayed as a hayseed...not Meredith Willson or the makers of ANTR.
 
May 27, 2007
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quote:

I think that we have the legends of the sinking that sprung up in newspapers to thank for Brown being portrayed as a hayseed...not Meredith Willson or the makers of ANTR.
Curse Yellow Press! Even if some of the stuff they wrote was fun or funny still they don't need to be making Margaret Brown sound like no hick 'cause she was born in Missouri! Dag'namit!

quote:

But by the same token, some of the American perceptions of Europeans, especially the British, tended to be equally amusing.
This is so and some British and European perceptions of America were equally amusing! Frankly some them thought all Americans were Hayseeds, Hillbillies and Hicks except for New Yorkers! Just like Us Yanks here in Yankeeland have amusing perceptions of each other. The Pushy New Yorker or the Dumb Hayseed, Hillibillie, or hick Southern States and Crazy Cowpoke Westerners like Texans! (I'm not even gonna go into New Jersey Mafia Image)​
 

Arun Vajpey

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>>>>>>> Frankly some them thought all Americans were Hayseeds, Hillbillies and Hicks except for New Yorkers! <<<<<<<

That's a very silly and unkind perception, I'm sure. Why, I have the greatest respect for people from Boston! ;)
 
May 27, 2007
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Arun,
Actually I should of been more clear that in the 19th Century this was thought due to the massive in flux of Western Dime Novels and possibly because of the Civil War. I never said in this day and age!

Although the movie "Deliverance" with Burt Reynolds might of spooked a few Europeans and Brits and if it did I for one don't blame them!
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Evgueni since your ah playing that there Banjo play me "Long Legged Woman Where Ya Been All Myh Life" then "Bebe, Angel Come To Earth" and then "Angelilah, Pretty Lil' Cajun Queen"!
 
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