I got some INFORMATION on the LOST 1912movie


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Caroline Chavez

Guest
Hi everyone. I have a video myself, called "TITANIC TRADEDY AT SEA" it has two films callind "ECHOES OF TITANIC" & "TITANIC REMEMBERD" Anyhow, on my First tape "ECHOES OF TITANIC" they talk about the lost filmed called "SAVED FROM THE TITANIC" Staring Dorothy Gibbson. It was the first Titanic movie ever filmed just 1month after the sinking. It was shot just in 3weeks, and was Released May, 14, 1912. They say "NO PRINTS OF THIS FILM SURVIVES" So, do they know this for a fact, i sure guess they do. If someone knows that they know this for a fact please Explain in here
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HERES SOME MORE INFORMATION ON THE MOVIE:

:CAST:
Dorothy Gibson: as her
ALEX FRANCIS: father
MISS STUART: mother
JACK ADOLFI: ensign jack
WILLIAM DUNN: his pals

: A LITTLE ABOUT DOROTHY:
She was saved on lifeboat #7 at 12:45am. There where only 28people on her lifeboat

I hope this little information was a little useFul to some of you. If not o well
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PLEASE POST ANYTHING ABOUT THIS SUBJECT. thank you
-Caroline
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
Hey Caroline,

If I remember correctly the only surviving copy that we know of was destroyed in a fire some years back. Sorry I don't have anymore details than that!

-Trent
 
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Caroline Chavez

Guest
Aw well i didnt even know that, haha, thanks. BUT TO OTHERS if you know anymore information please post it
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-CAROLINE
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
Hey Deborah,

It was produced by the Eclair Film Company of Fort Lee, NJ...which I believe was the company which Dorothy belonged to. The movie was only ten minutes in length and Dorothy wore the same dress she did when the Titanic sank.

The promo poster reads:
ECLAIR'S EXCLUSIVE EXTRA
A Startling Story of the Seas Greatest Tragedy
By Miss DOROTHY GIBSON, A Survivor
She Is Supported By a Powerful Cast
Six Color and Cold Posters, Herald's Photos
A FILM WITHOUT PARALLEL

Eclair Film Co.
Fort Lee, N. J.

TUESDAY MAY 14​

-Trent
 
Jul 12, 2003
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Thank you for the info Trent. I was almost hoping that copies could be found in the depths of a film vault...if it was made by a film company that was either still in existence or at least absorbed by another company that still exists. Is it possible? If not the film, perhaps whichever studio took over the holdings has a poster or a still or something from it.
 
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As an afterthought, was this film something that was shown in one of those nickelodeon machines that were often found on boardwalks way back when? I just thought of that when I remembered that on Main St. in Disneyland there is a place where there are many such nickelodeons. Maybe one of them was the Titanic one.
 
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
I know it was originally shown in regular movie houses. I wonder if they could then transfer it somehow to nickelodeons once it ran it's course at the movie houses? I seem to remember there being a surviving still of the movie and Mr Eaton,I believe, owns a copy of the poster.

-Trent
 
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
I went to the official site for the movie industry in Fort Lee, NJ...which seems to be the forerunner to hollywood..it had this to say about Eclair Studio:

"The French film manufacturing company, Societe Francaise des Films et Cinematographes Éclair, opened an American branch with a studio at Fort Lee in 1911. Its studio, designed by the firm which designed its new Paris facilities, was considered the very latest in movie studio design. It combined glass-covered shooting stages with administrative offices, photographic laboratory, dressing rooms, scenery storage, and workshops, all in one plant. In 1912, the Éclair American Company joined with the new Universal Film Manufacturing Company and its productions became associated with the release patterns of the larger company. On March 17, 1914, fire destroyed negatives and the main studio building. Éclair officers included Jules Brulatour (1911)."

That is the fire that most likely destroyed "Saved From the Titanic"

-Trent
 
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Caroline Chavez

Guest
Well what i want to know is it known for a FACT that there is no copy in the WORLD of this movie(Saved From The Titanic). LIke is there any type of article thats of the movie Stating there is no copy left? Thank you for your time. God Bless
-Carline
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
I believe there are only one or two still photographs remaining from this movie, and they were for advertising purposes. You might want to look at the "Beyond Titanic" DVD, in which this issue is addressed.

(Mark this date as my first actual answer to a Titanic question!)
 
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Dorothy Gibson was a 22-year old model and silent movie star from New York who escaped the Titanic's sinking along with her mother, on Lifeboat 7. She had been in Italy for filming, and was returning on the Titanic to New York, at her filming company's request. "Saved From the Titanic" was released on May 14, 1912, and she was a promoter and co-writer. This film was greatly criticized at the time for "insensitivity", as it was released too soon after the actual event, and didn't do much for her career. She soon gave up acting, married briefly, and lived in Paris, where she died in 1946.
 
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Caroline Chavez

Guest
Thank you Mary, I'm still looking for an article thought stating a proven statement ill guess i'm going to go find it myself!lol! well gosh, you all have been REALLY helpful to me. Thank you all so much.
-Caroline
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Mary S. Lynn

Guest
Can't help you there, Caroline! I'm a "newbie" myself! You still might want to order or rent the "Beyond Titanic" DVD, as it shows a couple of still photos, and explains why this film is not available. Good luck!
 
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Trent mentioned a Universal Film Company...if it is the same company as Universal Studios in universal City, I guess you could write to their archive department and see what they have...maybe someone kept a copy hidden away in their desk and over the course of several decades, it was discovered. But, the composition of film back then was not the same as it is now. Therefore, if there was a copy that escaped the fire, it is very likely to be deteriorated by now...espceially if it wasn't kept at a certain temperature.
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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Some of these old films were deliberately burned, as they were such a fire hazard. Many years ago, I attended a fire-fighting display in which a large quantity of nitrate film was used to demonstrate the latest in equipment. It went up like crazy.

It's always hard to prove a negative. Try proving that I haven't got a gold brick hidden somwhere. It can't be done to total perfection. You can only ask questions and search in every conceivable place. That's what's been done in the case of the old movie, but it's never been found. Neither have most of Gibson's other films. I'll try to find the site that has them all.

Gibson was in fact a very minor figure. Her total output would be less than half the length of Cameron's flick. Evidently sleeping your way to the top is not always successful.
 
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Trent Pheifer

Guest
Hey everyone,

Dave said, "It's always hard to prove a negative. Try proving that I haven't got a gold brick hidden somewhere"

You took the words right out of my mouth..sort of. I could not figure out how to put it into words..but I was thinking it lol.

-Trent

PS. I was really amazed that Dorothy had a bio on IMDB!
 
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It is highly possible that a family member as a copy...and might not even know it...like it could have been in a packed box or something that hasn't been opened (what a fun mystery).

So many times in the past you hear about "lost films" being found...some were in obscure places or in a mismarked film canister, etc.

We will probably never know if a copy exists or not as there are so many possibilities of its existence.
 
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Although it's true that Dorothy Gibson ended up being "minor," since she dropped out of film making after "Saved from the Titanic," she got a good deal of publicity for some of her first movies, both in the US and France. Her popularity as a Harrison Fisher model (being more recognizable to contemporaries than she is to us) also gave her a cachet with audiences. In addition Dorothy was associated with an influential (though short-lived) studio that proved a training ground for several notable French directors and producers. In 1910-11, Eclair was just beginning its American distribution, aided by Kodak (and Dorothy's lover Jules Brulator). Dorothy was billed as the company's new "star" and, on the strength of the hit she made in the Titanic film, was definitely headed for bigger billing in the feature-length pictures that were starting up in 1912.

Had Dorothy been more ambitious as an actress it is likely she would have been very successful and would now be known beyond the narrow band of silent movie (and Titanic) buffs.
 

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