I need some help


L

lynette ekins

Guest
I'm not sure if this is the right place to post but here goes: My friend doesn't understand exactly how the Titanic sank and despite my numerous attempts, she still doesn't understand and I was wondering if anyone had a clear explanation that could help me. Thanks a lot.
 

Lee ONeill

Member
Feb 6, 2007
3
0
71
I have to write a short report (1500 words) on the reason(s) for the sinking of the Titanic. Any suggestions as to the best way to go about the subject in such a short wordcount? The topic has to be discursive and i would like any feedback from members of the site as to the best approach.
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,132
1,486
383
Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
Lee, keeping the reasons short and sweat:

- The ship was steaming at full speed into a known region of ice.

- Those in charge of the ship assumed they would be able to see danger early enough to avoid any serious accident.

- They were wrong about that.

- The iceberg caused damage to the ship's 1st five watertight compartments.

- The ship sank because it could not stay afloat with her first five compartments compromised.

That's basically it.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
692
483
Easley South Carolina
If you want to really keep it short, you can sum up the above points by saying that Titanic sank because they overestimated their ability to see and avoid ice.

It's really just that simple.

However the devil is always in the details, and how you can get into this in only 1500 words is anybody's guess. We've been at it for years and some of the members here have written entire books on the subject. It might help if you could share an outline of what you have in mind.
 

Lee ONeill

Member
Feb 6, 2007
3
0
71
Thanks Micheal, i get your point about the details. I think i will identify some main points ( speed, the make-up of the ship, the ice warnings, the confidence to spot and avoid bergs ) and then argue for/against if the disaster could have been prevented.
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
692
483
Easley South Carolina
G'Day Lee, I'm not really convinced that the make up of the ship was quite the factor some make it out to be. It played a role but when you get down to the nitty gritty, the ship sank because she was subjected to more through hull damage then she could possibly survive. More in fact then just about any ship could survive even to this day.

There is a lot of so-called Monday Morning Quarterbacking in how the Titanic could have been "Beefed Up" to survive this sort of damage but such proposals are seldom quite the fix some might suppose and may even cause more problems then they solve.

A double hull for example, which might have made a difference but which raises issues with preservation since corrosion is a problem not easily dealt with. It can also cause problems with assymetric flooding if the outer hull is breeched. Raising bulkheads which make up the watertight boundries might have helped, but then yoi still have all that weight up forward lifting the stern up with the consequence being severe bending loads on the keel.

The bottom line is that some of the fixes which may look like "Common Sense" to us at first blush aren't always the cure all some would believe. They also ignore the fact that if the ship had steered clear of the icefield in the first place, none of the Titanic's asserted design flaws would ever have been an issue. You might want to think about that a spell.
 

Will C. White

Member
Apr 18, 2007
267
2
111
You might approach it as a classic case of hubris. Consider the mindset of those involved. It was Edwardian England and man had "conquered" nature. It must have been an incredible shock to Smith and Andrews that the ship was in fact going to founder and that many people, including themselves were very likely to soon die. If the ship had gone according to Andrews estimate, there may have very well been only a couple hundred survivors (look at boat launch timeline).
 
Jan 11, 2006
353
3
111
Lee ONeill

quote:

I have to write a short report (1500 words) on the reason(s) for the sinking of the Titanic. Any suggestions as to the best way to go about the subject

Disregard the armchair theory that Titanic collided with, or grounded on an underwater shelf of, an iceberg which is a fantasy that exists only in the minds of those inexperienced in ship handling and pack-ice navigation, and has nothing to do with facts.​
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
692
483
Easley South Carolina
>>Disregard the armchair theory that Titanic collided with, or grounded on an underwater shelf of, an iceberg which is a fantasy that exists only in the minds of those inexperienced in ship handling and pack-ice navigation,<<

No it's not. Really Captain, you know better then that, so why continue to make this rediculous assertion?
 

Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
5,045
318
353
Will, I think you should be advised that Captain Collins purveys certain theories that are highly controversial, to put it politely.

They are not accepted by the great majority of Titanic experts, including those who have the nautical intelligence to comprehend.

It's hard to recommend a single good book for your purpose. You could do worse than read both A Night to Remember and The Night Lives On, both by Walter Lord. The first book is not entirely accurate, having been written before the wreck was discovered. The second corrects much of the first.

Naturally, I'd like you to get my own e-book but it would take you a month to read!
 
Mar 22, 2003
6,132
1,486
383
Chicago, IL, USA
www.titanicology.com
quote:

Naturally, I'd like you to get my own e-book but it would take you a month to read!

Dave, the original question by Lee ONeill came back in April. If he is still around, and has a continued interest, I can only assume he has the time to read it. I'm afraid Capt. Collins' reply came too late to impact what Lee was originally asking for. But then again, I don't believe his reply, two months too late, was really directed at Mr. ONeill.​
 
Jan 11, 2006
353
3
111
Dave Gittins Posted on Thursday, June 7, 2007 - 3:59 am:
quote:

They are not accepted by the great majority of Titanic experts, including those who have the nautical intelligence to comprehend.
Please cite one Titanic expert who has the nautical intelligence to comprehend​
 
Jan 28, 2003
2,524
15
223
Have you guys read the novel Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow? Nothing to do with your discussion really, except that it is largely an extremely interesting Inuit-written revelation about ice, icebergs, and snow. Miss Smilla doesn't have much 'nautical intelligence' as she loathes ships - at least those that take her into the Arctic - but she still knows far more than anyone else about the hazards.

PS If you read the book, ignore the ending. Bit daft. Think the author, who really wanted to write about Inuits and ice, got a bit stuck at the end!
 
Dec 2, 2000
58,614
692
483
Easley South Carolina
>>Please cite one Titanic expert who has the nautical intelligence to comprehend<<

Captain, that one has been done to death and it's time to give put it to bed once and for all. Quite a number of people who are very well informed and who do have the "Nautical Intelligence To Comprehend" have rebutted your theory right here on ET. That you and they happen to disagree doesn't take away from that.
 
Mar 7, 2006
106
0
111
<<They are not accepted by the great majority of Titanic experts, including those who have the nautical intelligence to comprehend.
>>

I have yet to see a single individual (expert) named, that agrees that the Titanic did not impact with an Iceberg.

If this is just not one man's opinion, then lets have the names of these experts that agree that Titanic did not hit an Iceberg.
 

Will C. White

Member
Apr 18, 2007
267
2
111
Interesting-one would assume then that she ran well in at speed, and would most likely have endured multiple strikes on both the port and starboard sides along her entire length. Is there any evidence about lifeboats navigating around pack ice after lowering? In addition, the ice up forward must be accounted for, and one would think that chucks of ice big enough to fatally damage the ship would've possibly provided a haven for a few hardy souls later on. The only way to not have ice in the same proximate place as the ship stopped is if Smith drove a possibly badly damaged ship onwards and cleared the ice prior to stopping, which would seem both incredible and unbelieveable.
 

Similar threads

Similar threads