Ice Bergs Float RIGHT


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Caroline Chavez

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Ok i just wrote a hole articel(myself) on this topic, but i can't find it. SO IF YOU HAVE ALREADY SEEN THIS SORRY. I am the one who posted "WHAT IF IT WAS A HEAD ON COLLISION" If they did hit straight forward wouldnt the ice berg move a little? I mean This ship was going fast, It was a HUGEEEEEE ship(obviously bigger than the ice;) ) But would the Ice Berg moved? Was it THAT big this Ice Berg? I dont know but if i kind of think about it.. This ship weighed TONS, maybe the strenght of this ship could have moved the ICE Berg? Maybe? Maybe not! please post comments!
-Caroline
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Bob Godfrey

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The Titanic was a very large ship, but the iceberg was probably a lot bigger. Remember that the top of a berg that shows above water is only a very small part of its bulk, and the average weight of a North Atlantic berg is about a quarter of a million tons - compared with that, even the Titanic was a midget. Weight for weight, no contest.
 
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Caroline Chavez

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Bob, i think weight is important. The capacity on the ship can have a great impact on the Ice Berg, well i did not know that the Ice Berg was BIGGER than the hugest ship. But you nor I know the real answer.......
 
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Tom Pappas

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An iceberg of a million tons or so is, for all intents and purposes (of physics) an immovable object. Think "brick wall 100 feet thick." It might be displaced by a 50,000 ton mass ramming it, but only by inches. That means that something on board the ship has to give.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Caroline, nobody disputes that weight is important. The berg may well have tipped a bit when the 50,000 ton mass of the ship ran over that ram, but the fact of the matter is that for all her strength, the Titanic sank anyway. Whether it would have happened that way in a head on collision is anybody's guess. Wilding thought she could, but his opinion was only as good as the assumptions they were based on.

If the assumptions were wrong, a lot of the conclusions based on those assumptions likely won't hold up well either.

You might also want to check out the end results of actual collisions between ships of roughly the same mass. The damage is still pretty horrific. Ask the Andrea Doria and Stockholm.
 

Kyrila Scully

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Ever hear of the "tip of the iceberg?" This adage refers to the fact that you only see a small fraction of the iceberg on the surface of the ocean. Underneath the surface is where the mass of the iceberg is. Yes, ice floats. But the displacement is different for ice than it is for ships in that most of the ship is above the surface while most of the ice is below the surface. That is why the impact was worse on the ship than the 'berg itself. Somebody send this girl that picture of the iceberg that was floating around awhile back to show how deep below the surface an iceberg can extend. Maybe the picture can explain it better than the words of people who have studied these matters for years.

Kyrila
 

Bob Godfrey

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Caroline, think of it like this. A car drives at full speed into the back of a parked truck. The truck is on wheels and its brakes are off, so it will be pushed forward. But there's something called INERTIA, which means that things that are moving don't want to stop, and things that are stopped don't want to start moving. And during that brief moment while the car is still moving and the truck is still stopped, a lot of damage is done - mostly to the object that was moving (including the people inside it). Hope that makes sense.

As for the weight of the iceberg, if we take its height above water to be about 70 feet (and that means a great deal more below water) and its girth below water to be around 300-500 feet, I'd be surprised if it weighed less than one million tons and it could easily have been up to 4 million tons. That's a very big truck.

Now, things are getting confusing because you started this thread after asking the same question in another thread. So the discussion is spread over two different threads, and that wasn't a good idea.
 
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Caroline Chavez

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Well gosh im sorry BOB. Im not perfect and do make mistakes, i didnt intend on doing that. But thank you for you comments and for all you others. Keep posting.
-Caroline
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Jun 11, 2000
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I've just read a book called Miss Smilla's Feeling for Snow which is written by a Dane-Inuit. It's a thriller, but don't let that put you off it. Much of the book is devoted to explaining the Inuit understanding of (sea) ice and snow, and is quite fascinating. Especially for those whose job has taken them into such realms of expertise.

They made a film of it in the late 1990s with Julia Ormond, but I don't think that explained the ice and snow quite so well. Good exposition of the different types of iceberg, as well as how to know if you're about to plunge down a crevasse, how safe it is to walk on frozen sea etc. Personally, I just decided never to get into such situations, with or without Miss Smilla. A feisty heroine, to say the least.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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But I should warn you, despite the vastly interesting stuff about ice ... it's a bit of a disappointingly dumb ending. However, that's only the last few pages.
 
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Okay I feel like a dope asking this question, but here goes; what is a "growler"??? Hope I am in the right place, and I'm sure I'm not the first to ask this....
 

Adam Went

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They are also a good indication that more dangerous bergs lay ahead.

I wonder how they got the name "growler" ?
 
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This is off of Athropolis' website, dunno how accurate this is, but it's all I could find.

Bergy Bits and Growlers

Very small chunks of floating ice that rise only about 1 meter / 3 feet out of the water are called "growlers". When trapped air escapes as the iceberg melts, it sometimes makes a sound like the growl of an animal, and that's how growlers got their name.
 
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