Iceberg Breaking Open Portholes?

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Aaron_2016

Guest
Reading accounts and examining the wreck it appears a number of passengers on D-deck (above boiler room 5 and 6) had shards of ice pushed through their portholes and possibly breaking a number of windows. e.g.


Edwin Kimball - "The ice came in our porthole.....the ice from the iceberg poured in our porthole."

Emma Bucknell - "I was awakened by the crash.....when I went out into the corridor between our cabins I found pieces of ice on the floor. They had been forced through a broken porthole when the iceberg was hit."

Anna Hogeboom - "We were awakened by a terrific crash on the side of the ship where our staterooms were. I called to my sister and niece to find out what it was. In going out to the corridor we found many ice crystals, which had come in through the portholes."

Alice Leader - "Someone in the stateroom next to ours called out that we had struck an iceberg and pointed to bits of ice which had fallen on the ledge outside the porthole."

Kornelia Andrews - ".....The crash came and we were all in bed. I rushed to my door and met Gretchen coming from hers and ice crystals were all over her, having come in the port hole......I rushed to the door and saw the ice crystals all over, they having come in through the porthole next to mine."


Right at their location there are a number of windows missing, yet those around them are fully intact. Can we safely assume these windows were burst open by the iceberg as it pushed against them?


Bowwreckportholes




The windows on D-deck appear to be several inches away from the exterior.

Portholes4


Does this mean the ship knocked hard against the iceberg (steered into the ice?) and broke the windows as the ice pushed against them? The ice was thrown down the corridor, so it had to be quite a punch against the side of the ship.

- Emma Bucknell - "I was awakened by the crash.....when I went out into the corridor between our cabins I found pieces of ice on the floor. They had been forced through a broken porthole when the iceberg was hit."


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Robert T. Paige

Member
Thanks, Aaron.
This is certainly an interesting new development.
I don't remember even seeing any previous posts on this subject.
Also no comments in the book or movie of ANTR.
I don't have any comments, but just wanted to thank you for bringing up another topic.
Hopefully some of the old time veterans might have some comments.
You're always learning something new on these forums.
 
Michael H. Standart

Michael H. Standart

Member
Occam's Razor applies, peeps.

While it's not impossible for the glass in a porthole to have been broken, it's also possible that some were simply open to allow "fresh air" inside. Granted, it was bitingly cold outside but some people find that refreshing.
 
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Robert T. Paige

Member
There were also some comments that some portholes were opened to get "fresh air" because some cabins had some strong odors from fresh paint.
 
Lyle

Lyle

Member
I have no doubt she plowed into that iceberg, and it wasn't a gentle, bumping affair. Ice coming in portholes, open or not, plus people covered in ice crystals is proof enough of a pretty darned hard embrace between the ship and the ice.
 
Augusto Félix Solari

Augusto Félix Solari

Member
From what I know, many of the passengers left the portholes in their cabin open, to let some fresh air in. Since the Titanic was brand new, the smell of fresh paint must have been quite strong.
 
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Ioannis Georgiou

Member
Not much to do with the smell of paint. If I remember right it was nothing unusual to have the window open even it was cold back then in those days.
 
Augusto Félix Solari

Augusto Félix Solari

Member
It had also to do with the notions sorrounding hygiene those days (and nowadays). It was commonplace to open the windows to ventilate despite the cold weather. Or at least I gathered that from reading pieces that were set arround the same era...
 
LukeW17

LukeW17

Member
Yes. Open portholes on Titanic’s sister ship Britannic were one of several reasons she sank so fast.

Luke
 
C

coal eater

Member
britannic had almost all portholes opened while titanic a couple but not so much. question would be how much water would be pushed throught opened porthole,counted by m3
 
A

Aaron_2016

Guest
I think a number of portholes were broken by the ice crushing against the side, but also a much larger number of portholes were left open as well on the Titanic e.g.


Survivor Charles Joughin was asked:

Q - On E deck are the portholes in practice opened from time to time?
A - Very, very often we keep them open the whole of the passage.


Survivor Emily Ryerson was asked:

Q - When you went down into the water, from the boat, did you notice anything about the portholes in the side of the ship?
A - Yes, a great many were open.

Q - Did you notice anything in particular about the portholes on the water?
A - Yes, the water was washing in the portholes, and later I think some of the square windows seemed to be open, and you could see in the cabin and see the water washing in and the gold furniture and decorations, and I remember noticing you could look far in, it was brilliantly lighted, which deck I couldn’t tell.

Q - Did you notice any of the lines of portholes disappear after you got in the boat?
A - Yes, she was sinking very rapidly then, we saw two lines and then we saw only one. It was very brilliantly lighted and you could see very distinctly.

Q - At the time your boat was lowered the water was washing in the portholes of the C deck?
A - Yes.

Q - On that side?
A - On the side she sank, that is the port side.


Open windows on the Olympic.

Portholes1


Portholes2


Ship1port
 
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
I read somewhere that when the plates were ruptured from the collision that the total area open to the sea was roughly equal to the area the size of a standard door. If the areas open to the sea were say 30ft below the waterline the head pressure was around 14-15 psi so the water would essentially be pumped in. If just say 10 portholes were opened that would be the same or more than the area opened to the sea from the ruptured hull plates. So it would make a huge difference if true. I'm not sure how they came up with the area the size of a door since I understand most of that area is buried in the mud to confirm it. You would think someone would have ordered the crew to make sure everything was closed up as much as possible but maybe not. Good topic. Thanks for posting it.
 
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