Iceberg gash and Boilers exploding/crashing


Dan Kappes

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Sep 26, 2018
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Before the wreck was found, most people thought the iceberg ripped a 300-foot gash in the Titanic's hull which caused her to sink, and the loud noises heard by survivors during the final moments of the sinking were thought to have been the ship's boilers exploding and/or crashing through the hull of the ship as her stern rose into the air. In hindsight, those noises could be attributed to the ship breaking in two as we now know it did during the last moments.

If the Titanic did sink intact, could the boilers have really broken loose from their mountings and crashed through the hull as it was thought at the time?

Also, would the Titanic have really floated as long as she did if the iceberg did make that long of a gash in her hull instead of the six small holes in the wrong places that was later discovered?
 

Seungho Kang

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Mar 5, 2019
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South Korea
If the Titanic did sink intact, could the boilers have really broken loose from their mountings and crashed through the hull as it was thought at the time?
I am not sure of this, but even if the boilers fell out of the ship, Titanic would rather go straight down from its vertical position, rather than falling back to an even keel and sinking like the pre-1985 theory.
Also, would the Titanic have really floated as long as she did if the iceberg did make that long of a gash in her hull instead of the six small holes in the wrong places that was later discovered?
no, because it would cause it to sink faster.
 

Brad Rousse

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Nov 27, 2002
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Prague, Czech Rep.
If the Titanic did sink intact, could the boilers have really broken loose from their mountings and crashed through the hull as it was thought at the time?
The break-up wasn't really the issue; it was more the angle. Regardless, the boilers remained in their beds during the final plunge, save Boiler Room 1 which disintegrated during the break-up. What survivors claimed were boilers exploding or breaking free was probably a combination of just about everything else moving and the imminent failure of the ship's structure.

Also, would the Titanic have really floated as long as she did if the iceberg did make that long of a gash in her hull instead of the six small holes in the wrong places that was later discovered?
No. She would have sunk in an hour or less. In fact, Wilding calculated the damage way back in 1912 as probably being no more that 12 sq. ft.
 
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mitfrc

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Jan 3, 2017
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Before the wreck was found, most people thought the iceberg ripped a 300-foot gash in the Titanic's hull which caused her to sink, and the loud noises heard by survivors during the final moments of the sinking were thought to have been the ship's boilers exploding and/or crashing through the hull of the ship as her stern rose into the air. In hindsight, those noises could be attributed to the ship breaking in two as we now know it did during the last moments.

If the Titanic did sink intact, could the boilers have really broken loose from their mountings and crashed through the hull as it was thought at the time?

Also, would the Titanic have really floated as long as she did if the iceberg did make that long of a gash in her hull instead of the six small holes in the wrong places that was later discovered?

At the inquiry, HW engineers explicitly stated that the boilers would not be dislodged from their footings by angle alone unless the angle exceeded 35 degrees. The chance of the boilers breaking through the hull is almost nonexistent even if they did dislodge; the engines, that's more plausible. (boilers have no very heavy but small in area features which could provide the requisite pressure, even if they are heavy enough).
 
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