Iceberg the

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Telford George

Guest
Does anyone know about the Iceberg, with which the Titanic collided ?.
Where had it come from, (yes, I know it would have been from the Arctic area, or possibly Greenland !) but has there been any investigation of that particular "ice-field", as reported in the timeline, and in particular, how long did it take from the time it broke free, until the time of the collision ?
 
Dec 4, 2000
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Brown, Richard
The Voyage of the Iceberg
Beaufort Books, Toronto & New York
James Lorimer, 1983


This book tries to follow the path of the iceberg from the glacier to the accident. Good read, but some errors.

(The author is not a relative of mine!)

-- David G. Brown
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo Telford - the Iceberg wasn't a passenger, so I've moved your thread out of that section of the board and down to 'General Titanica'!

If you want a satirical look at the berg, and are not easily offended (this title isn't for everyone's sense of humour!), there's Senan Molony's booklet 'Confessions of an Iceberg' - it can be purchased through http://www.titanicbooksite.com/bookstore.html
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
I'm afraid that there wouldn't have been a detailed investigation of that particular ice field beyond charting the extant of known ice. Where this all came from in general terms was not really a mystery. The glaciers were there in Greenland and other locations for all to see. Detailed tracking of ice fields and bergs in the sense that we understand did not...so far as I know...begin in earnest until the International Ice Patrol was formed.

I'm afraid that there's really no way of knowing where "THE Berg" that killed the Titanic came from. The thing wasn't seen by a lot of people beyond the watchstanders, a few crewman, and perhaps a few passengers who hadn't gone to bed. Once things got going, they had more pressing concerns then locating a huge chunk of ice that had long since been swallowed up by the darkness.

Several icebergs have been offered up as candidates as THE Berg, but solid proof is lacking. You may find This Article by Henning Pfeifer to be of some interest as it offers some arguements in favour of one particular candidate.