If there are any human remains in the wreck where do you think they are


Dec 24, 1997
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> [Coolers and refrigerators explode like bombs they implode and then explode at about 1000 feet with enough force to blow out hull plates depending how tough the door seal is and it usually is pretty tight especially in walk in coolers]
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Malcolm, there was no Engine Room 6. You may want to check out This Hotlink To The Orlop Deck to see the arrangements. There was one engine room for the reciprocating engines, another for the turbine, and a single seperate space for all four of the ship's generators.

Jon's points about the coolers and reefers is well taken. From the cork found on the surface after the ship sank, you have compelling evidence that they imploded. A rather violent event that doesn't leave much beyond bite size bits of food for the fish. Given the natural acidity and calcium poor chemistry of the wreck site, it's extremely unlikely that any human remains exist. I won't go so far as to say utterly impossible, but if any remains exist, they would be deep within the ship and probably buried deep within the sediment.
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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"Jon's points about the coolers and reefers is well taken. From the cork found on the surface after the ship sank, you have compelling evidence that they imploded."

The refrigerated compartments were constructed in the stores flats on G deck and the orlop, with a cargo compartment on the starboard side of the orlop. All were served by the No.4 twin hatch trunks.

To cast a characteristic spanner into the works...

While the entrance doors may incidentally have kept out the inundating seawater for a while due to back-pressure on the seals, these compartments were not strongrooms, rather they were built up from insulated panels and may not have had any load-bearing function either vertically or laterally. Thus, doors notwithstanding, the bulkheads may have failed at a much shallower depth than the postulated 1000 ft.

Noel
 
Dec 24, 1997
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Noel, (is this the Tuba Players Associate per chance?)
Point taken the 1,000 mark was based on Robert Ballards expertise in matters pertaining to submersibles. Coolers and reefers may not be an part of ships construction but they are very strongly built and of course when closed sealed airtight. So perhaps the 1000 mark may not have been exact but I would say pretty close. Cheers Jon and Bambi
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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"(is this the Tuba Players Associate per chance?)"

I'm baffled! The only tuba I have knowingly associated myself with is the Wagner Tuba.

Noel
 
Dec 24, 1997
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> [ Hi Noel. Well I have egg all over my face. You see I saw the first name Noel and at once thought it was someone I knew from Las Vegas who is a fan of Barry Manilow who I refer in jest to as the Tuba Player. So apologies for the confusion. Ain't senilty great. All the best Jon]
 

Noel F. Jones

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May 14, 2002
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"The only tuba I have knowingly associated myself with is the Wagner Tuba."

That should have read: The only tubas I have knowingly associated myself with are the Wagner tubas. I was forgetting they come in two pitches.

Who's this Manilow fellow?

And I wouldn't be seen dead in that cultural desert that is Las Vegas. On second thoughts, given the reputation of the place, there's an excellent chance of anyone being seen dead there.

There again, money is a great motivator...

Noel
 
Dec 24, 1997
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> [ Hi Noel This Manilow is a singer if some note Barry Manilow.Been around for quite some time.Top hit "Copa Cbana" Cheers Jon ]
 
S

sharon rutman

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What everyone tends to forget is that the majority of those who died were victims of hypothermia--no one could survive very long in water that was 28 degrees. Also, the White Star Line made arrangements for the Mackay Bennet and the Mina to comb the areas to retrieve the bodies from the wreck site. Other bodies simply drifted with current and were never recovered. If there were any bodies within the wreck itself, they've simply became fish food so it's unlikely if there are any remains still around, especially after nearly century submerged in the North Atlantic
 
Dec 24, 1997
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> [Sahron you forgot there were THREE ships conscripted to the search. Flail the old dead horse 100 years is norhing compared to the VASA and some other oldies. It now has been proven the deeper inside you go the more you find. It Is A Matter Of Time wait and see. Hope all is well with you over these past many many moons. Cheers Jon]
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Aug 20, 2000
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Actually, you're both wrong. There were four vessels that were assigned to retrieve the bodies; the MacKay-Bennett, the Minia, the Montmagny and the Algerine. Having said that, the majority of bodies was picked up by the Mackay-Bennett and the Minia.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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In case anyone might think otherwise, none of those recovery vessels looked for bodies in the immediate vicinity of the wreck site. Mackay-Bennett was first to arrive and went straight to a reported location for the main concentration of bodies which, following the drift of the current, were by then 40 miles away from the point where they entered the water. As they continued to drift at approximately 0.5mph, the recovery ships followed their course which took them further and further away from the point where Titanic went down.
 
Dec 24, 1997
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> [Hi Bob, If I recall was it not a German passenger liner that saw something floating in the distance ahead and the passengers came out on deck to see what it was. Then as they got closer they saw many bodies floating including a circle of men with their arms interlinked and that this was the position that the MB went to based on the German ships radio report? Cheers Jon]
 
Dec 24, 1997
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Hi Jason Tried posting this before but it never showed up. What I wrote was to say thanks for the update somehow the Algerine always gets overlooked. Thanks again for pointing it out.
Cheers Jon
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Yes, Jon. The M-B responded to two reports, one you mention from the Bremen and the other from the Rhein. Both reported wreckage and bodies, 100 plus in case of the Bremen. The reported positions were only about 6 miles apart. The M-B arrived in the vicinity within a few hours, and at daybreak discovered many bodies drifting amid 'extensive wreckage'.
 
Dec 24, 1997
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> [Hi Bob, Thanks for the clarification Thought I had remembered that. Now the gears are whirling again. Wasn't one of the objects spotted the body of a woman holding onto a large dog? Also did not one of the ships report seeing a large portion of wood which appeared to be part of the Grand Staircase? I am sure I read about the staircase somewhere perhaps in the M-B report?? Again thanks for the help. Cheers and all the best Jon]
 
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I'm curious about the circumstances that cause these bones to break down. I understand about the calcium levels in the water etc, however, I was recently reading a book about the Hunley. Remains belonging to all of the ships crew were found from 1864. As I believe the Hunley was located in salt water as well, I'm wondering if the cause of deterioration is due to the depth of the bodies? If anyone could explain this to me, I'd appreciate it
happy.gif
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Amanda, the remains of the Hunley's crew, to say nothing of the Hunley herself, were completely encased in mud and mud is a wonderful preservative in it's own right. The problem with any human remains on the Titanic is that they were not so protected and the local chemistry is somewhat on the acidic side, and that is not kind to calcium. Anything not ravaged by hungry local sealife would have dissolved away within only a few years unless enough mud accumulated to cover it up.
 

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