If you had to pick five...?

Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
On the other side of the coin, George Behe, whom Jason mentioned earlier, is regarded as one of the great gentlemen of the Titanic community, and he certainly has written some powerful, thought-provoking articles and monographs regarding the Titanic.
Those stories are 100% true. I've had my share of dealings with DAB and he is not a nice person, to put it mildly.
I've read a few stories about the bloke who wrote "Unsinkable", he wasn't exactly Mr Popular with many in the Titanic community, so I gather !
The best, if not one of the best historians and researchers in the community. He is also a good friend to boot.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Steven Christian and Seumas
Seumas

Seumas

Member
Those stories are 100% true. I've had my share of dealings with DAB and he is not a nice person, to put it mildly.
Didn't he get caught plagiarising a whole chapter of a book on Cunard liners from a website or something like that ?

The best, if not one of the best historians and researchers in the community. He is also a good friend to boot.
The first time I became aware of Mr Behe was when I got the "Death of a Dream" documentaries on VHS as a kid.

It was noticeable (in a positive way) how much the story of the ship and those who sailed in her clearly meant to him. He dearly wanted to get that across to the viewers, and I think he did do so successfully.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Thomas Krom and Jason D. Tiller
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
Didn't he get caught plagiarising a whole chapter of a book on Cunard liners from a website or something like that ?
Yes he did. It was a book on the Lancastria:

He also plagiarized from "A Night to Remember".

The first time I became aware of Mr Behe was when I got the "Death of a Dream" documentaries on VHS as a kid.
Same with me, although I didn't get it on VHS. I watched it when it aired on television and I've had it on DVD for the last 13 years.
It was noticeable (in a positive way) how much the story of the ship and those who sailed in her clearly meant to him. He dearly wanted to get that across to the viewers, and I think he did do so successfully.
I completely agree. One of the reasons for that, is the fact that George had two distant relatives on board, one who did not survive (Arthur Ryerson).
 
  • Like
Reactions: Seumas
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
Her Name: Titanic
That book by Pellegrino is quite poor and has far too many basic errors. I have one of the earlier editions of the hardcover where the Titanic is described as a "Cunard Liner" on the back cover. Might be a collector's item like an upside down stamp.

But it does have some good serial sketches showing the sinking pattern, including flooding though open portholes. That's the reason I left it off my 'worst' list.

In fairness, I have seen posts in her defence on this forum by Parks and Inger, so there must be worth in some of her work.
ALL the "facts" in her book are taken from other works (often unacknowledged) and cleverly edited to seem original. But anyone of average intelligence can see though that.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jason D. Tiller
Jason D. Tiller

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
But it does have some good serial sketches showing the sinking pattern, including flooding though open portholes. That's the reason I left it off my 'worst' list.
Yes that is true, it does. That is the only good thing about Pellegrino's book.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Arun Vajpey
Seumas

Seumas

Member
Same with me, although I didn't get it on VHS. I watched it when it aired on television and I've had it on DVD for the last 13 years.

I completely agree. One of the reasons for that, is the fact that George had two distant relatives on board, one who did not survive (Arthur Ryerson).
I had absolutely no idea that George Behe had relations aboard the ship !

His research and his work to further knowledge and discussion of the ship is a good tribute to them.

That book by Pellegrino is quite poor and has far too many basic errors. I have one of the earlier editions of the hardcover where the Titanic is described as a "Cunard Liner" on the back cover. Might be a collector's item like an upside down stamp.

But it does have some good serial sketches showing the sinking pattern, including flooding though open portholes. That's the reason I left it off my 'worst' list.


ALL the "facts" in her book are taken from other works (often unacknowledged) and cleverly edited to seem original. But anyone of average intelligence can see though that.
One of the big red flags for me with Pellegrino's work was the suspicious number of times he cited as evidence for some of his more fantastical claims "private collections" which no other Titanic researcher has seen before or since. It was all a bit too convenient.

His writing style was also ridiculously florid, and he was prone to using five words where one would suffice.
 
Last edited:
  • Like
Reactions: Arun Vajpey and Jason D. Tiller
N Alison

N Alison

Member
I have read Michael Davie's "Life and Death of a Legend" and enjoyed it for what is was worth. I have read Ghosts of the Titanic as well but did not care for it. It seemed more speculation than otherwise. I am reading Gilded Lives, Fatal Voyage at the moment.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Seumas
Milos Grkovic

Milos Grkovic

Solo 3D modeller and Artist
Member
I have two Titanic books so far:

A Night to Remember by Walter Lord
Ship: 5,000 years of Maritime Adventure by Brian Lavery
 
N Alison

N Alison

Member
I just finished Titanic at 2 A.M. It was a quick read and interesting group of reports by survivors,
 
  • Like
Reactions: Steven Christian and Arun Vajpey
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
I just finished Titanic at 2 A.M. It was a quick read and interesting group of reports by survivors,
Paul Quinn has written another similar book about that night called Dusk to Dawn, from the same perspective of survivor accounts. It behgins at dusk on that Sunday night and proceeds till dawn with the survivors in lifboats. It is reasonably interesting with occasional conjectural licence by the author. But I am surprised that it hardly ever gets mentioned in these forums.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Kathy S
Steven Christian

Steven Christian

Member
Those stories are 100% true. I've had my share of dealings with DAB and he is not a nice person, to put it mildly.

The best, if not one of the best historians and researchers in the community. He is also a good friend to boot.
Never had any interactions with those 2 but Mr Behe from what I've seen and read from him always seemed like an all around good guy and straight shooter to me. I also remember him first from watching "Death of a Dream". You could tell he really cared about the subject. Don't know anything really about DAB. I read some reviews of his Unsinkable book back in the day and decided to pass on it. Cheers.
 
Kathy S

Kathy S

Member
I've read a few stories about the bloke who wrote "Unsinkable", he wasn't exactly Mr Popular with many in the Titanic community, so I gather !
I love Dan Butler. He's a love-him-or-hate-him kind of person. I thought The Other Side of the Night was fantastic. A fascinating (well, to me, anyway) analysis of Stanley Lord.

I see I'm not alone in my distaste for Her Name, Titanic. I'm not a fan of Charles Pellegrino, specifically, his writing style.
 
Seumas

Seumas

Member
I love Dan Butler. He's a love-him-or-hate-him kind of person. I thought The Other Side of the Night was fantastic. A fascinating (well, to me, anyway) analysis of Stanley Lord.

I see I'm not alone in my distaste for Her Name, Titanic. I'm not a fan of Charles Pellegrino, specifically, his writing style.
It's been pointed out before that Mr Butler's "diagnosis" of Stanley Lord as a sociopath was extremely flawed.

Butler only took one professional's analysis on the matter and Butler himself does not have any medical qualifications to make such a diagnosis. He proved nothing.

It's not ethical to print such things. Professional historians just don't do it.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jason D. Tiller and Arun Vajpey
Arun Vajpey

Arun Vajpey

Member
I agree. Starting from the title, Dan Butler's Unsinkable is almost unreadable. Very boring, quite a few errors and nothing new.

Stanley Lord was a strict disciplinarian, perhaps even bit of a martinet but certainly not a sociopath. His problem was that he had the sort of personality that made him not very likeable, including his own crew.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Jason D. Tiller and Seumas
Top