Imagine you'd been on the Titanic...

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Talira Greycrest

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Just for a moment, imagine you'd been a Titanic passenger. What class would you be in? Would you be travelling alone or as part of a group? Most importantly, do you see yourself surviving the disaster or would you have given your life trying to save others?
 
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mitfrc

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Jan 3, 2017
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The first women engineers graduated in 1905 - 1908, so I suppose I'd be in second class with one maid accompanying me and an informal chaperone of somebody who knew somebody from the university. My family was living in Russia at the time, so probably I would have received an education in Sweden where the universities were open to women and married "by agreement" to someone I'd never actually live with to avoid a premature and abrupt end of career. I think that would lead to an almost banal experience on the Titanic; you wake up with your servant and hastily pack a few valets, your chaperone shows up and leads you to a lifeboat, you exchange some parting words and never see him again, and a few hours of being cold later get picked up on the Carpathia. I would have harangued the lifeboat crew to go back for rescues, but Lowe's argument on waiting for the crowd to thin out was absolutely authoritative and sensible, and so that would be that. About the only thing passengers could do to increase the survival toll would be to cajole the crew into letting men close to them onto the boats -- and in the daze of coming up on deck in a short notice with authoritative directions being given, this would be really hard to seize upon doing.
 
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Aaron_2016

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My Great Grandfather was British and sailed to New York alone in 1913 aboard the Celtic in 3rd class to earn a better wage in Chicago and send the money back to the family in Ireland. If I went with him aboard the Titanic we would probably be directed up towards the boat deck or the stern by the stewards after the women and children were taken up. Passengers were not allowed to take their luggage with them, so we would fill our pockets with essential papers etc and follow the other men with our lifebelts. We would probably take our chances with one of the collapsible boats. Whether we would both survive is unknown.

My other Great Grandfather was German and sailed to New York in 1910 on business we believe in 2nd class. He was an architect's accountant and travelled quite a lot. If I sailed with him aboard the Titanic then we would probably be directed up towards the boats quite early but we would wait indoors and out of the cold. We would discuss the situation with fellow passengers. I am a keen photographer and like to research news events so I would probably take that opportunity to look for Mr. Stead (famous journalist) and tag along with him, asking the crew what was happening, taking notes, and perhaps asking the passengers to pose for photographs in their life jackets. None of us would realise how serious the situation was as we waited in the lounges listening to the ship's band and wondering what ship would reach us first. Gradually the rumours would create a panic as the list became more noticeable and the sounds of screams and gunfire on the boat deck would make us abandon our drinks and put down our notes. We would venture up and down the decks to see if all of the lifeboats had left the ship and would be alarmed when we realized the lifeboats were not staying close to the ship. I would try and find my Great Grandfather and hopefully both of us would go to the forward boat deck to see the last collapsible boats being washed away and try to swim towards them. Whether we would both survive is unknown, but very few 2nd class men survived.


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Adam Went

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Apr 28, 2003
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I'd like to think that I would have been in third class, posh has never been something i've aspired to be!

Cheers,
Adam.
 
Dec 28, 2016
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Well, my mother was Italian, and my father was mixed race (black, Cherokee Indian, and White (Irish and German)). We were poor, so we would obviously be in Third Class, provided my father, a racial minority, would be allowed on board. Would we survive? Well, I loved my dad, and I likely would have had to have been physically torn from him to get me into that lifeboat, provided there was a boat to get in. My family and would have at least attempted to try to swim to a lifeboat.
 
May 3, 2005
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Years ago (When I was much younger) I had gone so far as to make a deposit for passage on Second Class on the old RMS Queeen Mary, but changed plans and never got around to it. Then , much later, we stayed in one of the former First Class Suites st Hotel Queen Mary.

I think if I had been young and single and Titanic had made it to New York, I would have booked passage at least in Second Class and maybe even saved up enough for First Class Round Trip. Or looked into the possibilty for Marconi Operator.

But......If I had sailed for my return trip on the Maiden Voyage of Titanic , I 'm not so sure that I would have been one of the survivors.
 
May 3, 2005
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I think (if Aaaron_2016 and Father Browne would have allowed me) being an amateur photographer, I would have tagged along with them taking pictures on my new Kodak Brownie.

But I might have chickened out and got off at Queenstown with Father Browne.

Also being a wireless enthusiast I would hsve to meet Philips and Bride.
 
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RobertB

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Mar 10, 2016
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If determining the class we would have traveled based on mean income today then I would be a strong 3rd class passenger. Maybe second class if given a couple more months to save. Male age 40ish in 3rd or 2nd class, my fate is surely death, I would of course help others but given the testimony the launching of the boats was very directive and authoritative, not sure how much help I could have been.
 
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Always weary when a topic of this degree starts the ball rolling, and usually goes abit off-track and heads elsewhere.

The first question I always ask myself, how would you of how would I define "class"? Remember all the class structures had their own individual problems.

The other I ask how would I define "class" with the Crew?? The sad fact rest's mostly on the Crew as they never seem to get a look in on this subject. We'd 1st Class, 2nd Class and 3rd Class Stewards, etc.. and as ever I can never find the right answer for each and every structure put in the variety under "class".

Has any one else asked that serious question -- how do we define "class"?
 
Apr 26, 2017
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I don't know. I would like to think my self a first class passengers going to America for a school assignment. And I would hope to have made friends or enjoy myself anyways. During the sinking. I would like to think I would help and I would also be aiming for collapsibles (the last boat to leave the ship)
 
Apr 26, 2017
110
23
63
Always weary when a topic of this degree starts the ball rolling, and usually goes abit off-track and heads elsewhere.

The first question I always ask myself, how would you of how would I define "class"? Remember all the class structures had their own individual problems.

The other I ask how would I define "class" with the Crew?? The sad fact rest's mostly on the Crew as they never seem to get a look in on this subject. We'd 1st Class, 2nd Class and 3rd Class Stewards, etc.. and as ever I can never find the right answer for each and every structure put in the variety under "class".

Has any one else asked that serious question -- how do we define "class"?
By money of course . And by value to society. But if that were the case I guess 3rd class would be the most valuable. They do all the work
 

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