Impact Titanic had on subsequent ship design


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Dec 3, 2005
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Well, hulls are welded. And the rivets that were tested for strength were a very small sample compared to the whole three million and change. So sadly, the discovery of the hull taught us really little about how to build ships. It's still important, though. It's one more thing to investigate! :)
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Fast forward to now and I'm married to the same guy.<<

Hope you're not contemplating murder.
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Seriously, the rivets aren't quite the big deal that they were made out to be and for the reasons that Peter made. The statistical sampling was too small. It speaks to something like 33 rivets in a hull, all from unknown locations, that had over three million of them, and most of them are still where the builder left them. The ones recovered from the debris field came there as a consequence of a 12,500 foot plunge where the bow ploughed into the mud with such force, that it's noticebly bent downwards something like ten degrees below what was level.

With forces like that at work, it's a wonder more rivets weren't popped off.

You might find http://home.flash.net/~rfm/index/contents.html to be a useful resource to study. It helps to explain a lot!
 

Kammy Tribus

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Aug 6, 2006
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Hi Michael,

And a big thanks to all for your answers.

Murder? No, not today.
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I am curious if anything discovered in the sinking had any effect on modern ship design in any way. I know that seems far fetched but, well, my wedding anniversary is coming up. If anyone can post anything that supports my original statement all those years ago, I'd like to frame it and give it to my hubby as an anniversary gift!

Cheers!

Kammy

P.S. The amount of that force you were talking about... now would that kill someone?
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Jul 9, 2000
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880
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>>The amount of that force you were talking about... now would that kill someone?<<

Probably. Do you have somebody in mind??
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Seriously, I don't think Titanic had any real impact on ship design beyond the usual medley of knee-jerk reactions that "Felt good" in 1912 whether they made sense or not. Olympic was highly modified with with double sides and watertight bulkheads were raised up, and Britannic had these new features built in while still on the slip, but none of this appears to have rippled down anywhere else.

Try and find a passenger vessel with double sides and the sort of extensive watertight subdivision that any Olympic class liner had and you'll be in for a very frustrating search. There might be one or two extant but for the most part, they just aren't there.

As to the popped rivets, the problem of uncertain provenance and too low a statistical sampling remains. The fact is that if you clip an iceberg, you will have some popped rivets, split seams, and hull plates that are crumpled and cracked.

What I do think would be useful would be if somebody were to find rivets in the seabed a few miles to the south and slightly east or west of the wreckage and the debris field.

The reason?

It would tend to give a very probable datum of where the collision actually took place.
 

Kammy Tribus

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Aug 6, 2006
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Dear Michael,

Why yes, I was thinking of certain insurance industry executives involved in the Katrina fiasco on the Gulf Coast. However, now that I have stated my murderous fantasies here, recorded for retrieval by any decent DA, I shall have to pass on that idea.
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The passenger cruise industry is notorious for operating the largest amount of ship for the least amount of money. Sad but true.

Thanks for the further details on Titanic. I suppose I shall have to live with being wrong. I just won't mention it to that husband of mine.

Cheers!

Kammy
 
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