Incomplete parts at the time of the voyage.


May 3, 2005
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Faulty parts! One has to question the quality of coal on board? The best coal was Welsh rated at 16,000 BTU. But due to the national coal strike was not available. Where 4,427 tons were taken from the following ships. St Louis, New York, Philadelphia, Oceanic and Majestic all imported from USA. An inferior grade rated at 14,300 BTU. The coal from Belfast was not much either to. Scotch coal rated at 14,200 BTU.
This are a softer grade and burn at a quicker rate. Bunkers capacity of 6,611 tons. Titanic left Southampton with 5,892 tons. About 11% down.
Back to more serious questions.
Would carrying less coal and that at a lower quality would have caused any future problems if Titanic would have sailed on to New York as scheduled ?
 
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Seumas

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Back to ''unfinished parts'' :
And weren't there complaints about paint smells ? Perhaps indicated that the paint had been applied too hastily and not allowed to dry properly to prevent any paint odors ?
Aye, was it not Violet Jessop who claimed they left out big vases of fresh flowers in the passenger accommodation to try and mask the smell of the paint ?
 

Mike Spooner

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On my visits to Belfast City Town Hall a few years ago, I remember seeing some of the Titanic furniture on display that was due to be loaded but never was!
 
Mar 18, 2008
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Bunkers capacity of 6,611 tons. Titanic left Southampton with 5,892 tons. About 11% down.
She still had enough for extra 2 days. Olympic coal consumption was under 4,000 tons at her maiden voyage, so she had enough coal. (Mark Chirnside can sure come up with the accurate number.)
 
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Mar 18, 2008
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On my visits to Belfast City Town Hall a few years ago, I remember seeing some of the Titanic furniture on display that was due to be loaded but never was!
Belfast is full of stuff which was for Titanic or was used to build her. It seems Titanic was the only ship H&W ever build. However so far we have seen all furniture on display had the same story and all were not for the ship.
 
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Seumas

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Belfast is full of stuff which was for Titanic or was used to build her. It seems Titanic was the only ship H&W ever build. However so far we have seen all furniture on display had the same story and all were not for the ship.
In the years and months that followed the disaster, was there ever any evidence that individual shipyard workers or outside contractors were making a few quid on the side by selling furniture and fittings made for other ships but claiming to gullible collectors that it was "meant to be aboard the Titanic" ?
 
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Jim Currie

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For 25 years, I was Newbuilding Surveyor for Underwriters at the John Brown - Marathon - UIE -Shipyard, Clydebank. Since 1953, I have been on very many new ships right out of the yard. Never once, did I ever sail on a perfect new ship. Very often we sailed with "Yard Men) aboard.

Seamus is right on the money concerning the romantic, ill-informed ideas and nonsense that the Titanic tragedy had dredged up disguised as intellectual thought. Having said that, without such ideas, some of us would miss the pleasure of pontification.;)
 

Seumas

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For 25 years, I was Newbuilding Surveyor for Underwriters at the John Brown - Marathon - UIE -Shipyard, Clydebank. Since 1953, I have been on very many new ships right out of the yard. Never once, did I ever sail on a perfect new ship. Very often we sailed with "Yard Men) aboard.
Jim, do any particular incidences of going to sea in a new ship with incomplete fittings or even shoddy workmanship stand out for you ?
 

Jim Currie

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Jim, do any particular incidences of going to sea in a new ship with incomplete fittings or even shoddy workmanship stand out for you ?
How about this one?

It was on the ore carrier " Dunadd" built by Sir William Lithgow and Sons, Greenock.

We completed the trial trip and came back to Greenock to send the Yard men ashore. The ship was stopped but allowed to drift as the men transferred to the tender. The Pilot was still on board.

We then turned around and headed down for the Cumbraes to drop the pilot.

At the Pilot Station, the ship was stopped again until the Pilot disembarked. The "Old Man" rang down full ahead and as the engines started, all the light fittings on the Officer's deck fell out. But we were not finished.

We headed across the Atlantic for the Gulf of St Lawrence. One day out from St. John's Newfoundland, we hit thick fog, a force 10 gale and there was, as usual, ice about.
Being light ship in ballast, the bow rose and fell like an express train. Suddenly we got the "all hands on deck " call" with the added order to head for the Dry Cargo hold at the bow. When we got there, we found that our spare propeller which was normally stowed upright and clamped to the aft side of the collision bulkhead in that hold, had broken loose and fallen on the tank top and was skidding across the deck from port to starboard trying to batter its way through the ship's side.
Fortunately, after riding on the thing for about an hour or so, we were able to secure it against any further movement. But not before it had popped God knows how many rivets on the side shell plating..
We limped into St John's and spent 2 weeks there having the bow repaired.
The ship was what they termed composite... part welded- part riveted. it transpired that the riveted securing straps for the spare propeller had failed.

Happy Days!:rolleyes:
 
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Seumas

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What a story Jim ! That's a proper "how the hell did we get out of that in one piece ?" kind of experience. I trust no-one was hurt ?

When your company reported what had happened someone at the shipyard must surely have got a rocket put up them for that kind of incompetence.
 

Jim Currie

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No one was injured, Seamus. However, you have never lived until you have surfed on a 5-ton propeller through 3 feet of ice-cold sea water while trying to lasso a hold pillar with a bundle of half-inch steel chain.... all by the light of a single lamp cluster. :eek: Just one of many adventures during an amazing time in my life.
 
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Ricky B

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Hi,

In the book 'On a Sea of glass', it states that some of Titanic's interiors were incomplete by the time she set sail. Does anyone know which areas were incomplete? I remember reading long ago, that there was to be an organ installed in the forward first class entrance on the boat deck level (where the piano is).

Kind regards :)
 

Harland Duzen

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Not to be rude, but are you thinking about the Britannic? She was planned to have a organ installed but it never got on board due to be converted into a hospital ship. The organ still exists in Switzerland.


Edit / update: As Ioannis has corrected, Not Sweden but Switzerland. My mistake. :oops:
 
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Bob_Read

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The way you can tell that an organ as was intend for Britannic was not planned for Titanic is the boat deck balcony around the forward first class entrance. On Titanic the balcony was continuous around the aft side. On Britannic the balcony was interrupted on the aft side by where the organ pipes were to be installed.
 
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