Is the USS Oriskany the only Aircfart carrier used as atificial reef


Feb 14, 2011
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The footage of the USS Oriskany, a decomissioned aircraft carrier, being sent to the bottom was amazing- The Discovery crew put cameras inside the ship, so you could see the water creeping in as she sank-
What other warships have been *deliberatly* sunk with the intention of creating an artificial reef?
She now rests 130 feet down, 24 miles off the coast of Pensacola- The depth puts her out of range of most sports divers.....
They keep reairing the special of her demise on Discovery- its a must see!

regards


Tarn Stephanos
 
Dec 2, 2000
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A number of warships have been reefed by several nations. Canada does it all the time and New Zealand has reefed a couple of their old frigates. At the moment, the Oriskany is the only carrier which has been disposed of this way, though it looks like a number of the old supercarriers such as the Constellation may be disposed of in this manner.

Sometimes, things go badly wrong such as what happened to the former USS Speigal Grove. Go to http://www.navsource.org/archives/10/12/1232b.htm to see for yourself.
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Its a shame the liners Norway and United States are not turned into artifcial reefs-
Norway is probrolly being scrapped as we speak, and odds are the united states will one day meet the scrappers-Same with the Queen mary- If her owners go bankrupt, i say tow her out to sea and send her to the bottom....
First off, an artificial reef that was once a liner would be a **huge** tourist draw, plus being on the bottom is far more dignified than being send to the scrappers...
I wonder how much material they had to strip out of the USS oriskany before they sent her to the bottom?
Im remember Discovery also aired the deliberate sinking of a Candian warship- I can't remember the ship though.......

I think a decision needs to be made about America's mothball fleet- If its a choice of sinking or scrapping them, I'll pick sinking.....

regards

Tarn Stephanos
 
Feb 14, 2011
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Thanks for posting the images of the USS Speigal Grove, Michael. Once she turned turtle- couldn't they have simply attached explosives to her underside to blast open the airpocket?

regards


Tarn Stephanos
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Norway is probrolly being scrapped as we speak,<<

Not all that likely at the moment. The Indian Supreme Court would take one very dim view of that since the case is still in litigation. However, that's no barrier to stripping the ship down of anything of any real value. My own opinion is that the scrapping will go forward if only because the people at Alang have managed to drag her so close to the shore that refloating will probably be impossible. Even if it can be done, I'd be reluctant to try it. The operation would be expensive and after being hard aground, there's no telling how much damage has been done to the structure of the ship.

>>I wonder how much material they had to strip out of the USS oriskany before they sent her to the bottom?<<

Quite a bit. There was a lot of lead based paint that had to be removed, bunkers were found which still had fuel inside, equipment had to be taken off, and then any number of holes had to be cut in and voids filled with water to make sure that the ship would go down as planned. Any ship can be a toxic witch's brew of materials ranging from asbestos to hydralic fluid which has to be removed before anything else can be done. The Oriskany...which had been laid up for 30 years was no exception.

>>I think a decision needs to be made about America's mothball fleet- If its a choice of sinking or scrapping them, I'll pick sinking..... <<

Already done with a lot of them. Quite a few guided missile cruisers have gone to the scrapyard in Brownsville Texas as has some of the Spruance class destroyers. Some frigates and destroyers have also been dismantled in Philidelphia. Nuclear powered vessels are a whole 'nother smoke for obvious reasons. After up to thirty years in operation, the reactors are still "hot" even after the fuel cores have been removed. The scrapping of same is being accomplished at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard with the nuclear plants being buried at the Hanford reservation and the hulls being scrapped.

>>Once she turned turtle- couldn't they have simply attached explosives to her underside to blast open the airpocket?<<

This may have been considered but as Richard pointed out, the hurricane came in and finished the job.
 
Apr 27, 2005
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You can add the "Saratoga", expended at Bikini. Though technically not an artificial reef project, she is a diver destination, and loaded with old aircraft, etc., none of which is probably worth salvage at this time, and still considered USN property, though abandoned aboard the old carrier.
No, I'd rather not see the "United States" used as a reef project, although seeing teh "France" as one somehow makes me feel like she got ripped away from the exploiters who carefully plotted her ultimate demise. Fact is, the big commercial vessels are probably worth more as scrap if they are not operable as transportation of static hostelries. I may catch Hell for saying so, but expect that someday even "Queen Mary" will succumb to the scrapping process. Ships are deathly difficult and expensive to maintain as static objects.
 
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>>I may catch Hell for saying so, but expect that someday even "Queen Mary" will succumb to the scrapping process. <<

I would hope you would be mistaken on that, but you may well be right. A ship is deathly expensive to maintain no matter what, but at least they generate income when they're invloved in trade. The Queen Mary has had a lot of problems with mismanagement from the start and God only knows if the situation will improve.
 
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Wayne Keen

Guest
"Ships are deathly difficult and expensive to maintain as static objects."

Particularly if one if going to try to host people on them. It is surprisingly easier to keep things like aircraft on outside display, when all people do is go around the outside of the piece...

Wayne
 
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Wayne Keen

Guest
"bunkers were found which still had fuel inside"

When they did some major work on the USS Alabama a few years back, they were still finding significant amounts of fuel in places - and this is on a ship that has been out of service for over 60 years...

Wayne
 
Feb 14, 2011
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They aired the special again-What dramatic footage- How long did it take her to sink?
I was unaware there was a disater on her decks back in the 1960s....

I wonder if divers have already visited her hulk?
 
Apr 27, 2005
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She actually went down in rapid order; something like 30 minutes. That's very fast for such a huge thing as an armored aircraft carrier. Holes were cut throughout the hulk, and bulkheads removed.
 
May 27, 2007
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Michael >>The Queen Mary has had a lot of problems with mismanagement from the start and God only knows if the situation will improve.<<

I hope so I've never seen any ship except Riverboats on the Mississippi. I love to see the Queen Mary before she get scraped. I saw a special about her on the Travel Channel recently.
 

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