Is there any accurate movie about Titanic aside from A Night to Remember?


Hanan96

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Feb 6, 2017
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hi. I wonder what movie were at least historically accurate about titanic, aside from 1958 version.
 

Harland Duzen

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One thing about A Night To Remember is that it's very patriotic film from the British perspective. They weren't allowed to show the breakup as the British Inquiry officially denied it happened despite the survivors stating otherwise. The best example of this is when Fleet replies ''Iceberg dead ahead Sir''. They added the ''Sir'' to make Fleet sound more formal!

In terms of least accurate films, check the 1943 Propaganda Titanic film. It flopped at the box office like ''Raise The Titanic''.
 
Mar 18, 2008
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In terms of least accurate films, check the 1943 Propaganda Titanic film. It flopped at the box office like ''Raise The Titanic''.

What do you mean with it flopped at the box office? The film was shown the first time during the war in the occupied Paris. People had other things in mind. In Germany it was not allowed to run (during the war) as they were afraid of the negative reaction it could have (Germany loosing the war etc.)
 

Harland Duzen

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I had heard that it didn't make much money back after it was shown (and given what happened during Production to the Director it was certainly a chaotic film to make).
 

Hanan96

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I dont mean must 100% accurate. but at least were accurate as 1958 version

take a look at 1997 version. its mainly about fake jack and rose . so surely this isnt one
nazi version mainly talk about ismay wrong portray, and fake petersen, so surely not this one

I'm looking for at least got real person in there like 1958 which cover some real life person, majority were told about real person (lightoller) rather than majority from fictional character point of view
 
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Aaron_2016

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A Night To Remember was well made and focused on survivor accounts, but I think it skipped too much of the voyage between Wednesday and Sunday. I prefer SOS Titanic (1979) which was filmed aboard the Queen Mary and gave a real sense of what life was like aboard a luxurious ship. It also focused on survivor accounts from all classes and crew. The film was edited for DVD release but the original unedited version is around on VHS I think, although the video quality is not as great. It was the very first Titanic film I had seen, so it always has a touch of nostalgia about it.


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Arun Vajpey

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ANTR was a reasonably well made film in that it had the right ethos. But it is vary far from being accurate, even allowing for the fact that they did not have confirmation of the ship's break-up in 1958. There is a lot of artist's licence right from the start.

- The champagne bottle inauguration that never took place.
- Lightoller and his wife on the boat train.
- Kenneth More's Lightoller character being everywhere during the lifeboat launching, including places he never went.
- Captain Lord of the Californian asleep in his cabin in his pyjamas while most he did was rest in full uniform in the chart room.
- Captain Smith telling Thomas Andrews that the Titanic was "unsinkable"
..............and so on.

But what really disappointed me with ANTR was the bargain basement special effects. I am sure that by 1958 they had equipment and skill to make things look more natural. The smoke from the ship's chimney going the wrong way in the final moments is an example.

But for all that, ANTR at least had its heart in the right place, which is a lot more that can be said for other films on the subject. Jack & Rose indeed! :rolleyes:
 
May 3, 2005
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But for all its faults, the 1953 "Titanic" has a place for my nostalgia since I saw on "the big screen-first run" and the first I had seen.
It wasn't until years later that I saw the 1997 version on the big screen.
I now have DVD's of the 1958 ANTR and the others.
 
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Sorry to change the subject but which parts of James Cameron`s Titanic were not accurate? Aside from Jack, Rose, and other fictional characters that don`t interfere with history, obviously.

I know that the sinking theory has been revamped a little bit since that movie was made, but at the time that was the leading theory. You mean the fact that the grand staircase was slightly wider than the original and they added a few lights that weren`t there, for cinematic purposes?

I think James Cameron`s movie is pretty accurate, its only "fault" perhaps being that it isn`t like a documentary about the ship but that it has an actual movie story to it. If you watch all of the deleted scenes, it depicts a bunch of real events as well, at least as closely as is known about them.
 
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Amongst the many errors in the 1953 movie.:
The Titanic struck the ice berg on the Port side
The Astor's had an inside cabin
The Titanic had a complete Tailor Shop for getting long pants or a complete set of formal attire
 
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Aaron_2016

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When I first saw James Cameron's version the first mistake that comes to mind was Jack casually walking around 1st class while dressed in his steerage clothes and none of the crew seemed to notice. Cameron's version also doesn't show the port list which by the time Ismay's boat was lowered was considerable as there was great difficulty in lowering the boat as it was pinned against the side of the ship owing to the port list. Captain Smith is also for some bizarre reason portrayed as if he was completely inactive and in shock during the entire evacuation. Nothing could be further from the truth as he was seen giving out orders, helping to fill and lower the lifeboats, directing the boats to row for a ship that could be seen a few miles away, being in constant communication with the wireless operators, using a megaphone to give more orders, and general assistance with the passengers and crew. James Cameron practically put his character's role out of the film entirely.


Here are several accounts of his actions from the US and UK Inquiries. I tried to put them in chronological order.



August Weikman
"I met the Captain returning from G-deck who had been there with Mr. Andrews"

Harold Bride (wireless operator)
"He told us that we had better get assistance......He came into the cabin at frequent intervals......He asked Mr. Phillips what other ships he was in communication with......He worked out the difference between the Carpathia's position and ours......The Captain kept in communication with us; we either went to him or he came to us."

Quartermaster Olliver
Captain Smith gave him a hand written message with instructions to deliver it to the Chief engineer.

4th Officer Boxhall
"I said, “Is it really serious?” He said, “Mr. Andrews tells me he gives her from an hour to an hour and a half.”

Robert Hichens
"I heard the Captain say “Get all the boats out and serve out the belts.”

Helen Bishop
She saw the Captain talking to Colonel Astor - "The Captain told him something in an undertone." She said the Captain approached the ladies and gentlemen at the Grand staircase and told everyone to put on their life belts.

Samuel Hemming
"I had an order come from the Captain to see that the boats were properly provided with lights."

2nd Officer Lightoller
"I asked him: "Shall I put the women and children in the boats?" The Captain replied, "Yes, and lower away."

3rd officer Pitman
"I went to the bridge and asked him if I should fill No.5 boat with women and get her away.
Q - What did he tell you?
A - "Carry on," or words to that effect.

John Poingdestre
"I heard the Captain pass the remark, “Start putting the women and children in the boats."

Charles Hendrickson
He heard the Captain instructing the officers to put the women and children into the lifeboats.

Robert Hichens
"I heard the Captain say, “Women and children first,” and the officer repeated the words from the Captain."

4th Officer Boxhall
He saw the Captain supervising the lifeboats as they were being lowered.

Frank Evans
"He came to the starboard action boat that I was lowering, sir. He passed some remark to a tall military gentleman there with white spats on, but what it was I could not say."

Paul Mauge
He saw the Captain encouraging the ladies to get into the lifeboats and telling them "It is all right".

Hugh Woolner
He saw the Captain encouraging passengers into the lifeboats. "He said "Come along, madam," and that sort of thing."

Thomas Jones
"The Captain asked me was the plug in the boat, and I answered, "Yes, sir." "All right," he said, "Any more ladies?" The Captain shouted again - in fact, twice again - "Any more ladies?"

Hugh Woolner
"I made one remark to him. He said: "I want all the passengers to go down on A-deck, because I intend they shall go into the boats from A-deck." I remembered noticing as I came up that all those glass windows were raised to the very top; and I went up to the captain and saluted him and said: "Haven't you forgotten, sir, that all those glass windows are closed?" He said: "By God, you are right. Call those people back." Very few people had moved, but the few that had gone down the companionway came up again, and everything went on all right."

Major Peuchen
"The Captain said, "You had better go down below and break a window and get in through a window, into the boat." I said I did not think it was feasible, and I said I could get in the boat if I could get hold of a rope. He was doing everything in his power to get women in these boats, and to see that they were lowered properly."

4th Officer Boxhall
He saw the Captain using his binoculars and watching the ship nearby. The Captain told him to use the morse lamp and say "Come at once, we are sinking." and also to fire the distress rockets. He would later ask if there was any reply.

Mahala Douglas
"The Captain said "I want a megaphone." Just before we got into the boat the Captain called, "How many of the crew are in that boat? Get out of there, every man of you."

2nd Officer Lightoller
Lightoller heard the Captain ordering the lifeboats to return to the ship with a megaphone.
"I heard the commander two or three times hail through the megaphone to bring the boats alongside, and I presumed he was alluding to the gangway doors, giving orders to the boats to go to the gangway doors."

4th Officer Boxhall
The Captain told Boxhall to get into the lifeboat. After they rowed away he heard the Captain shouting through a megaphone and ordering the boats to come back.

Thomas Jones
"He told me to row for the light, and land the passengers and return to the ship."

James Johnson
"The Captain told the officer to pull for that light and come back again."

Alfred Crawford
He saw the Captain helping the crew lower lifeboat No. 8.
"Captain Smith and the steward lowered the forward falls of the boat I was in......The Captain, he came there; he came there and lowered the forward falls, he assisted in doing so......Captain Smith came to the boat and asked how many men were in the boat. There were two sailors. He told me to get into the boat......He gave us instructions to pull to a light that he saw and then land the ladies and return back to the ship again.....Captain Smith could see the light quite plain, as he pointed in the direction that we were to make for.....He pointed in the direction of the two lights, and said: “Pull for that vessel; land your people and return to the ship.” Those were Captain Smith’s words."

Walter Wynn
He was told to get into a lifeboat by the Captain

George Rowe
He was told to get into a lifeboat by the Captain

William Burke
"The Captain gave the order to the sailors that were working with me to go aft and assist about the last boat which I thought was going to be launched on that side."

Samuel Hemming
Samuel described a strong list to port about 15 minutes before the ship went down. He said the Captain yelled out "Everyone over to the starboard side, to keep the ship up as long as possible."

Harold Bride (wireless operator)
"He came along in a very short period afterwards and told us we had better look out for ourselves."

Edward Brown
He saw the Captain approach with a megaphone in his hand. He heard him say "Well boys, do your best for the women and children, and look out for yourselves.” He then witnessed the Captain walk onto the bridge alone just seconds before the ship took a sudden plunge.

Harold Bride (wireless operator)
"The last I saw of the Captain he went overboard from the bridge, sir. He jumped overboard from the bridge when we were launching the collapsible lifeboat."



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Mar 12, 2011
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The interior and exterior sets have ''since'' been found to be inaccurate but in their defence, much of this information (like the 1st class reception windows) weren't found out till several years later and the ship set was done to slightly shorter dimensions to save money.


See Here : http://www.paullee.com/titanic/jc1997goofs.html

That's a very thorough write up, but I admit I groaned and rolled my eyes at a few of the cheap shots he took at other researchers towards the end of the article. Thanks for the link, though!
 

Harland Duzen

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Jan 14, 2017
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Paul Lee has appeared to be ruffled a few feathers of other Titanic researchers but his attempts to hunt down every existing photo and newspaper report on the Olympic-Class-vessels has to be approved.
 

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