Is Titanic in two pieces or three


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Kathy Savadel

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I was just skimming through RMSTI's website and was confused by their mention of the "third piece" (their quotation marks) of the hull. I was always under the impression that the wreck was in only two main pieces, and the photomosiac clearly shows just the bow and the stern sections -- but then, I am a bit out of my league here. Can anyone clarify for me, please, what this "third piece" is? Many thanks in advance.
 
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Andrew Rogers

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G'day Kathy,
The third piece is referring to "the Big Piece" that was raised by RMST in Aug '98.
I think the three piece concept was an idea to try and draw attention to this large 20 ton piece of hull plating that they salvaged. BTW this is the same piece that was raised to the surface in 1996 and then accidentally dropped before it could be secured on the support ship.
I was fortunate enough to visit the wreck in sept.'98 and I can assure you there is no third section of hull sitting down there.
There is a lot of debris around the wreck which include some very large pieces of twisted metal so I suppose you could say there are many pieces down there!
The "Big Piece" is on display in the US somewhere, I think it might be Orlando.
I am in Australia and haven't seen it myself.
Bye
Andrew
 

Bill Sauder

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Nov 14, 2000
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Kathy:

There isn't an official "third piece" on par with the bow and stern -- however there are a number of scattered hull fragments that are quite large such as the aft well deck. I think that the writer may have in mind the overturned double bottom for the No 1 boiler room. I think that qualifies as the largest of the hull shards at 6 feet tall, 80 feet wide and at least 36 feet long.

Bill Sauder
 
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Kathy Savadel

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Andrew and Bill, thanks so much for the replies. I was beginning to wonder whether the ship broke into thirds, rather than halves, during the sinking.

Best,

Kathy
 
Mar 18, 2000
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Speaking of the 'Big Piece':

I heard just yesterday (from the friend of a friend, take it as you will) that the 'Big Piece' was spotted in a hangar down at Boeing in South Seattle. I assume in preparation for the Titanic Exhibit that is due to open here in Seattle in March.
 
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Kathy Savadel

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Hi Bill W. -- I hope you enjoy the exhibit, if you go (I'm assuming you will!). If you DO go, perhaps you could update us here on how the "big piece" is being presented? I was surprised at Chicago to note that a section had been cut off the piece and enclosed in a Plexiglas box, in which a small hole had been cut, through which you were to stick your finger so you could touch it. Meantime, the big piece itself was suspended in the background.

I'd be curious to know if this presentation style has been consistent from exhibit to exhibit.
 
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Tracey McIntire

Guest
Hi Kathy!
I thought I would throw in my 2 cents worth here. When I saw the exhibit in Atlantic City, the Big Piece was suspended on a framework but you were free to touch all of it. The first time I saw it was in Boston, just after they had brought it up. It was being sprayed with water to help conserve it but you were also free to touch the whole thing. It's interesting that the Chicago exhibit seems to restrict you that way.
Sincerely,
Tracey M.
 
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Kathy Savadel

Guest
Thanks, Tracey -- interesting! I seem to recall that some members in a different forum last year indicating that they were able to freely place their hands on the Big Piece at the Chicago exhibit...this was in the early months of the exhibit. I went in late June. I wonder whether a specific incident, or a more general conservation concern, prompted the change.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
All, while this is just a guess on my part, the exhibitors could have had a dust up with vandals and/or souveneir hunters. That or they have some good reason to beleive it could happen, hence the additional security.

Just a thought.

Cordially,
Michael H. Standart
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
hi everyone!

Just some tidbits concerning the big piece. Last year it was, as Tracy said, propped up by a frame work. However, the piece had been split up into two pieces, and was being shown at two separate exhibits. The year before that, the entire piece was being shown in Atlantic City, but it had to be kept in solution to stabilize the corrosion. The piece was keep outside under a tent, in a pool.
happy.gif
I'm not sure what the plans are for this year.

regards,

-Dean
 
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Dean Manning

Guest
one more thing.... I mispelled Tracey's name, sorry...
sad.gif


-Dean
 
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Tracey McIntire

Guest
Thanks, Dean! Not a problem--it happens all the time! :)

Tracey M.
 
Mar 18, 2000
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Kathy said:

>Hi Bill W. -- I hope you enjoy the exhibit, if you go (I'm assuming you will!). If you DO go,
perhaps you could update us here on how the "big piece" is being presented?<

Is the Pope Catholic? Is everybody here interested in Titanic? Of course I'll be going! (in fact, I've got three separate groups wanting to go with me - including my sister, who could care less about the ship!)

The rest of the story (from the friend of a friend) - the 'Big Piece' was unattended in a hangar at Boeing, and the person was able to walk up to it for a good look and a feel. A few days later, it had been moved somewhere else.
 
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Kathy Savadel

Guest
Bill W. wrote:

>> Is the Pope Catholic? Is everybody here interested in Titanic? Of course I'll be going!in fact, I've got three separate groups wanting
to go with me - including my sister, who could care less about the ship!) <<

Oh! I didn't want to assume anything; I've heard some people indicate they have opted not to attend the exhibits because they are opposed to salvage.

Three groups! That's great!
 

Bill Sauder

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Kathy:

I understand that the big piece was taken out of the public's "reach zone" because the caretakers were finding garbage wedged into the nooks. In order to gratify the public's need to "let me touch," the smaller piece was put in a case with a finger hole.

Bill Sauder
 
Dec 31, 2000
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To Andrew Rogers- I would love to hear of your account of going to the wreck in Sept. of 98.
It would be very emotional I would think. I believe it would be so for me.

Beverly
 
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Andrew Rogers

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Hi Beverly,
I have never really written about my experience but I have been interviewed many times.
There are some subjects here on the board that i have posted messages on. One is under the heading "submarine activity at the wreck site" and the other is an old subject titled "GMA". I think you will have to go to the keyword search to find that one.
It was an experience I will never forget but a strange sort of an emotional experience. I was so excited during the dive that I didn't really stop to dwell on the tragedy of it all, but on the Keldysh (mother ship) on the surface I would often look out over the ocean at night and think about how horrific it must have been for the people involved.
I did an interview the other day for a TV show here in Sydney called RUSH TV, they said they will edit some of the audio down to a few minutes and put it on their web site at www.rushtv.com.au
But don't hold your breath.
Bye for now,
Andrew
 
Dec 31, 2000
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Dearest Andrew!

Thank you so much for writing me back. Yes, I saw where you posted about the sub activity. I will look at the website for the interview. I would have been really excited myself, I wouldn't have been able to sleep!
What was it like on the Keldysh???

Beverly
 
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Andrew Rogers

Guest
Hi Beverly,
Firstly I must tell you, I rang the Rush TV people today and found out that the woman who interviewed me has left their employment and the interview will not be aired. Quite irritating for both of us I suppose!
If you like I can e-mail you some low res pics and I might be able to scan a magazine interview or two and e-mail them also. (I got your eddress when I clicked on your name)
The Keldysh was an experience in itself. To spend time with the two sub pilots, the crew and some pretty interesting fellow participants was a real enjoyable time.
I spent a lot of time with Alan Ruffman from Halifax (Canada) who was the on-board lecturer. Alan is a marine geologist and a very clued up Titaniac, he has a great book out called "Titanic Remembered" and mostly deals with the Halifax connections.
I got to dive on the third of the four diving days so it was interesting and kind of settling to hear from the other guys who had already been down.
Before I went down I was looking forward to it all ending (safely) but when we were down there I didn't want to come up!
Half of the 11 hour dive is spent descending and ascending so I had plenty of time to ask our pilot (Genya) many questions about his job, James Cameron and the Imax movie "Titanica".
The whole trip was information overload. I just wish I had a better memory and enough sense to write down what I was learning.
Bye for now,
Andrew
 
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