Ismay's homes


Mark Baber

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Dec 29, 2000
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I just happened to be within a few miles of Rutgers University's New Brunswick campus tonight, and a short detour led me to the following tidbits:

The New-York Times, 24 September 1891
ON THEIR WAY TO EUROPE
Among the passengers who sailed for Liverpool yesterday on the White Star steamship Teutonic were ... Mr. and Mrs. J. Bruce Ismay ....

The Times, London, 1 October 1891
THE MAILS
...
Liverpool, ... Sept 30,--- (T)he White Star Line s.s. TEUTONIC, from New York, arrived in the Mersey to-day.

The Times, London, 3 October 1891
DEATHS
...
On the 1st inst., at Dawpool, Thurstaston, Cheshire, suddenly, HENRY BRUCE, infant son of J. BRUCE and FLORENCE ISMAY, aged six months.

MAB
 

Phillip Gowan

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Apr 10, 2001
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Good Stuff Mark--(am assuming the first item was September instead of October 24th?)--That pretty well nails it unless the newspapers were psychic.

Phil
 

Mark Baber

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>am assuming the first item was September

That's a correct assumption, Phil. I've now edited my original message to say exactly that.

MAB
 

Teri Lynn Milch

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Apr 7, 2001
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Philip & Mark,

To my knowledge, Oldham is the only person to have had the ultimate pleasure of interviewing the late and lovely Ms. J Bruce Ismay.

Also, I do believe that Henry Bruce was Bruce and Florence's second child, was he not? That Bruce Henry did not live past six months was a deep tragedy for J Bruce, as Henry was to be his first born son.

Please correct on above points if wrong.

Teri
 
Nov 22, 2000
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It would appear that Bruce Ismay's childhood home on Beach Lawn, Crosby, Liverpool, did not sell as was anticipated. Instead it has been divided into apartments. My younger daughter's boyfriend has just bought one, how do I get an invite?

Geoff
 
J

Jemma Hyder

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Or give him the loan of your car, it's how my dad gets around my boyfriend!
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Hi Jemma & Colleen, I suppose I could always be delivered in a cake and pop out unannounced! Just hope Behe doesn't see this thread though!

Geoff
 
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Andrew Williams

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Geoff,

I think your find this is the morden day trend now. During the last couple of years I can't help but noticed how many fine and ellegent buildings in Southampton have been transformer from empty shells into luxury apartment blocks.

For example, take a much closer look at the old South Western House which as you know, is just within walking distance from the former White Star Office's. If it means this is the only way to preserve our hertigate, then I tend to favour this new method of thinking instead of getting, and calling in the bulldozers to do there damage. The project so far at the South Western House has proved to be very successful although there is talk of the next plan to transform the old Union Castle Offices which I believe is now underway.

One day when I win our National Lottery, I shall live like a King and call my apartment at South Western "My Castle" observing this unique arial view of Soutahmpton Docks.

Before I finish Geoff, perhaps you could be so kind and give us all a brief account on what has happened to the former Cunard building which I am led to believe, is next to the famous Liverbird building, Liverpool.

Andrew W.
 
Nov 22, 2000
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Hi Andrew, The Cunard Building is still there and Cunard still have offices in it. It's mostly divided up into separate firms now but at least is still in operation. This is the second Cunard building though Andrew, the present one being completed around 1917/20 if my memory serves me well. The original, I think is in Water Street, just a stone's throw away.

Geoff
 
Jul 10, 2005
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What a dishonor to J Bruce Ismay and to his family!!!
That house should have been preserved as a historical home, have tours and such. I HATE it when things like this happen!

GGGRRRRRRR!!!

Beverly
 
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Patricia Bowman Rogers Winship

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Well, Beverly, at least they didn't tear the place down to build the apartments, as they did the Lightoller home a couple of years ago!

Pat Winship
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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That was very gutting, Pat. I was out at Duck's Walk while visiting a site near Richmond last summer, and it just wasn't the same. Can't even recall what was on the site now - have blotted it from memory, apparently!

At least Penrallt is in the throws of restoration.

~ Inger
 

John M. Feeney

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Sep 20, 2000
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Hi, Bev: Oh, I don't know. I think Andrew has a sound point, and I've seen it borne out well *after* the fact.

Washington Roebling II (nicknamed "Wash" to distinguish him from his namesake, "The Colonel"), who died on the Titanic, was from Trenton, New Jersey, where his entire family was quite wealthy, influential and well known. (The various Roebling works were to a large extent the bullwarks of the local economy.)

While I was attempting to scope out Stephen Blackwell and "Wash" last Spring, I found that the only two Roebling residences still in existence in that burg -- both on West State Street -- were ones which *had* been renovated into "flats" or offices! The only extant family "mansion" -- if you can even call it that now -- is a heavily dilapidated, crumbling old townhouse, which might have been demolished years ago if it hadn't been converted to apartments at some point in the interim. (It is vacant nowadays.) This one belonged to Wash's uncle Ferdinand.

The beautiful home of Wash Roeblings's namesake -- his uncle, Colonel Washington A. Roebling, the "man who built the Brooklyn Bridge" -- was across the street more or less, and was willed to the State of New Jersey. That site is now prominently occupied by the New Jersey State Museum. (It is admittedly a pretty nice museum, but I'd give my eye teeth to be able to gaze upon the edifice that it replaced.)

The splendid house of Charles Roebling, Wash Roebling's father, was buldozed at some point and is currently occupied by some tacky municipal offices. What was once a fine "country home" is now an extremely plain, one-story "tar roof" structure. (But a huge shade tree that young Wash may well have played under as a boy still stands.)

Wash Roebling's last *intended* residence -- I am told his furniture moved in anticipation of him, though he was never quite able to meet with it because of the Titanic disaster -- is actually very well maintained, and quite handsome. But the only reason this is so is because it was long ago converted to commercial offices. (Fortunately, as was the case with Uncle Ferdinand's house, since this building was on the primarily commercial north side of the street it did not fall prey to increased government real estate needs.)

Incidentally, Jonathan Blackwell (Stephen's father) owned a Trenton "town" residence -- quite a mansion in its own right -- which is presently just foundation debris under the State House Annex.

So, I don't know -- better renovated than razed!

Cheers,
John
 
Jul 10, 2005
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Ok, yes, I concur that remodel instead of tearing down completely or scrapping is better, but if I were a milionaire, that house would be MINE and it would be restored and used for historical signifigance.

Still grumpy,

Beverly
 
Apr 14, 2001
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hi I reccently saw on this website that a lodge once onwned by bruce isamy, was for sale. It was in costelloe ,in ireland, ,and i was wondering if there is any information on how much the lodge went for? it looked very beautiful.
 

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