Jacana Fox


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Jacana Fox

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Apr 4, 2008
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Hello.

I'm a Tasmanian researching my ancestors' nautical experiences as mariners, emigrants and domestic passengers from the Second Fleet (1789) onwards. Several ancestors and relatives died at sea, including my g-g-g grandfather Capt. James Moodie in 1853 (there seem to have been a lot of mariners with that name!) on the Hobart-Melbourne run. My g-g grandfather captained a coastal steamer in the D'Entrecasteaux Channel in the 1880s, starting at the age of 18.

I've been interested in a general way in the Titanic since childhood (now 32) but only recently started reading the history, using this site as the gold standard for factual research and rational discussion. It's a relief to find info not tainted with romantic notions of life at sea, or mumbo-jumbo (mummies, premonitions, etc.)

Not able to sail at all myself now because of disabilities, I'm very interested to get as much of an understanding of the nautical world as possible vicariously.

Greetings to all, and thanks for letting me join.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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Hi, Jacana. Welcome to ET!
smile.gif


quote:

romantic notions of life at sea, or mumbo-jumbo (mummies, premonitions, etc.)

Oh, you'll still find a lot of that here, too, but it'll be tempered and balanced out by scientific and empirical perspectives. Myths have been dismissed and replaced with facts, and rational considerations outweigh the flighty. Still, all perspectives are discussed just the same.

I hope I see you around the board.​
 

Jacana Fox

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Hello Mark. Thanks for the welcome!

I do enjoy the tall tales when they are identified as such. The fact that so many people feel the need to believe in conspiracies and spooky nonsense is very interesting in itself, though also rather depressing. We've had to sort out a few tales from our own family history; the truth is always more interesting. Great that people on here do take the time to look at the more esoteric ideas and debunk them firmly but politely! (Though I'm not an academic myself, my sister is an historian and has helped set me right on the importance of Evidence, References and all that. As Henry Crun says in the Goon Show, "You must have the documents, you know!")
 

Bob Godfrey

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Welcome, Jacana. Especially since you are a fan of the Goons. As such you will doubtless recall that little-known tragedy at sea when Dartmoor Prison foundered in the Atlantic Ocean. This followed a maiden voyage to the South of France to give the inmates a holiday as guests of the notorious Chateau d'If. A cardboard replica was left in its place, of course. Sadly there were casualties when 'The Moor' went down, including an early drowning ("Poor lad, he tried to tunnel his way out"). Wonderful logic!
 

Bob Godfrey

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"Entry in prison diary. February the second. At sea. (hurl). Coast of France visible through the bars of F-block" - Ah, they don't write 'em like that any more! It's one of the classic episodes, Jacana, easily obtained on CD and not to be missed. Unless of course you've been forced to listen to the Goons by a friend who is a fan. Prince Charles perhaps? :)
 

Jacana Fox

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No, never forced to listen (and Prince Charles isn't my friend, no matter what people might say! That was just a scurrilous rumour put about by naughty Denis Bloodnok). It's on at 5:30 on a Friday morning here, and I'm often unfortunately awake at that time, usually because I'm not feeling well, so the show has come to have to mixed associations - I'm always glad to have them there to cheer me up, but sorry to need cheering up, if you know what I mean. The positive side of it is that I've also discovered Just A Minute, My Word, I'm Sorry I'll Read That Again, etc., which are played on different days. They certainly don't write like that anymore, which is a great shame. At 6:00 follows the current affairs, and that really does take us into the realms of the absurd. As Spike wrote:

A little girl called Sile Javotte
Said ‘Look at the lovely presents I’ve got’
While a little girl in Biafra said
‘Oh what a lovely slice of bread’.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Yes, indeed. Eccles and Bluebottle live in one universe, we in another with a quite different set of rules. And I can't help thinking that it's we who have drawn the short straw. I do hope that among those other goodies your radio station offers Around the Horn so that you are cheered by the ditties of Rambling Sid Rumpold and by Julian and Sandy's conversations with 'Mr 'Orne' in fluent Polari.
 
Jun 11, 2000
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Hello Jacana.
Your radio station sounds extraordinarily like the one I listen to during the very early hours. (I'm awake from about 5.30am onwards but Bob seems to be awake until about 3.00am from the timing of his posts ..)and it's the digital station BBC7 here in the UK, but you can get it on-line. Includes those you mentioned plus such delights as Ed Reardon's Week, Hancock's Half Hour, I'm Sorry I Haven't a Clue etc., and some great dramas.
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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A friend of the Goons is a friend of mine!

The joy of radio is that the pictures are so much better than on TV. That's why the surreal humour of the Goons works so well. I particularly remember the scene where Eccles suffers a heavy fall after going upstairs in a mirage of a house.
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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For the uninitiated, here's a typical conversation between Bluebottle and Eccles which demonstrates the impeccable logic of the Goon universe:

What time is it, Eccles?
Err, just a minute. I've got it written down here on a piece of paper. A nice man wrote the time down for me this morning.
Oooh. Then why do you carry it around with you, Eccles?
Well, if anybody asks me the time, I can show it to them.
(long pause)
Wait a minute Eccles, my good man...
What is it, fellow?
It's writted on this bit of paper, what is eight o'clock, is writted.
I know that my good fellow. That's right. When I asked the fella to write it down, it was eight o'clock.
Well then, supposing when somebody asks you the time, it isn't eight o'clock?
Then I don't show it to them.
Well how do you know when it's eight o'clock?
(longer pause)
I've got it written down on a piece of paper.
.
 

Dave Gittins

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Long before they killed Kenny, Bluebottle got exploded by bang in most episodes. Goon show explosions often included a long period in which small pieces came down with varied thuds and clangs.
 

Jacana Fox

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Bob-

Yes, they have had some episodes of Around the Horn in the past. (It's a revolving schedule.) That was one I would have liked more of. One of the sorry effects of my illness is that I can't actually laugh, as such, so the wicked folk-singer character (Sid?) was quite a health hazard. The smiley type of humour is more comfortable. (From that point of view, it's a good thing they don't make really funny comedy anymore. Watching the shows on telly nowadays I'm not in much danger of laughing.)
 

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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Sorry to hear that, Jacana. These days we've got used to the idea that most of the traditional pleasures of life shoud be avoided, but it must be a particular burden when laughter becomes a health hazard. We really should be recommending comedy shows that are not very funny, then. As you say, there's no shortage of contenders on the box today. So as long as you avoid Ricky Gervais (The Office; Extras) you should be ok!
 
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