Jack Grimm


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Jun 12, 2004
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Jack Grimm was an Entrepeneur who, before the Titanic discovery in 1985, wanted to find the wreck single-handedly and claim a type of 'title ownership' over it. He took a sensationalistic approach to his Titanic ventures and did it for publicity rather than out of genuine Titanic interest. Thank the Maker he didn't find it - heaven only knows what would have happened with the wreck if he had. I guess his name sort of serves as a foretelling. Wasn't his oil enough for him to own? Fat Cats with money think they can do anything they want, own whatever they want, and have a right to stick their 'grimmy' little hands in the pot without any problems...

By the way, Dan (and anyone else, for that matter), please don't tell me I'm wrong. I've read a lot about this man, and everything I said above falls under my point-of-view (i.e. opinion), and that will never change. Maybe that's how the media painted him up, but anyone who pursues historical discoveries just for the sake of money has no business being involved - I don't care how much f****** money the bloke has.

That's my two cents, as I can't afford to contribute as much as all the Grimms of the world are able to. Still, it's my two cents, and I'm entitled to that (and sorry about the language, hehe).
 

Dan Cherry

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Heh, Mark - no worries. I think the only contribution Grimm made to the Titanic community is figure out where the wreck WASN'T....

Though my interest in Titanic dates back to the early 1980s, during the midst of the Grimm search (of which I knew nothing), the 1985 announcement of Titanic's ocean bed location really put the telegraphs on 'full-ahead' for my interest in the subject.
 

Shelly Heston

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I knew it was a "total long shot." I found a letter from Jack Grimm to by Grandmother during his fantastic "search for evidence" indicating he may have "borrowed" some historical documents she had. I was hoping to find out what they were and if they were still around somewhere. Too bad the old dude died already......
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>By the way, Dan (and anyone else, for that matter), please don't tell me I'm wrong.<<

You won't get any arguement from me either way, but then I don't know enough about the man to offer one in any event. All I *know* is that he tried and failed. A game try, but in the end, he was an also-ran.
 
Aug 29, 2000
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Jack was certainly one of the world's unique personalities. His book, Beyond Reach- in which he put forth an outcropping of undersea rocks as a possible Titanic propeller blade, was riddled with errors too numerous to mention. He was plenty dedicated though, and along with his "The Virginian" t.v. western star friend, went hunting for Titanic, Noah's Ark, and Bigfoot. He wrote a very polite letter, even when one was correcting his book errors. He was a giant, maybe six feet four plus, with long white flyaway hair like Dr. Zorba. I first met Jack (who made his bucks as an Abilene wildcatter)in Virginia Beach when he took RMST to court to upset their sole salvor claim by trying to establish a claim of his own with an item which was not quite legitimately come by from the wreck! Dear old Judge Clarke (who has since gone also to his reward I believe) threw the case out of course. It was an exciting time in court. When the Nadir came into Norfolk bearing that incredible davit ondeck, Jack G. was there and as excited as a kid scrambling aboard for a look. When the whistles were put in the lobby of the hotel on exhibition, Jack lounged around with awe and pretty much haunted the hotel. I think he never quite gave up his castles in the air about Titanic.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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Sounds like his interest in the ship was way beyond any interest in money then. If it was just a business proposition and nothing more to the man, I can't really see him behaving quite as Shelley describes.
 
Aug 29, 2000
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For as much as we would tend to think otherwise, I know that the haunting magic that is Titanic is always a factor even in those people we would like to paint as money-grubbing, sensation-seeking, glory-stealing showboats. Grimm, Ballard, Cameron and others who have had very high profiles in this arena, while stirring up strong emotions in this eclectic community, have all- I believe, been captivated by her story and drawn into that fascination which none, once-bitten, can ever escape. Surely none of these men needed or craved the money or the attention-and I would like to think that there is/was something redeeming in the dreamer in all of them- it is reassuring somehow, to witness a finer private side to a very public persona. Society will always turn a suspicious and critical eye to those in the limelight.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Surely none of these men needed or craved the money or the attention-<<

Probably right. Cameron was and remains a very successful producer in his own right without Titanic ever entering the picture and Dr. Ballard was in no position to make any claims to the wreck since he was working for the government. Jack Grimm had already made his fortune and hardly needed Titanic to add to that. Given the difficulties of deep ocean salvage, it's not likely that he would have recieved much of a return on the investment had he tried to turn the ship into a cash cow in any event. The smart bet is that he would have either lost money or at best, made a very small return. Too small to justify the risks involved.
 
Jun 12, 2004
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I never claimed they did crave the limelight or the attention, but, money aside, many people like to "show off," and I've noticed that many of those who do have money. It's not always a matter of money when needing attention, but ego. All I was saying is that his Titanic ventures seemed quite sensationalistic to me. I did know about the error-riddled book, which didn't give me a good impression, although I admire the apology. The thing is that he (or his editor and publisher) should have been more careful about the information he was going to publish. Anything published with that many errors is liable to cast the author (not to mention his editor and publisher) in an incompetent and even non-serious light, and first impressions are usually difficult from which anyone would find it hard to break away.

You have one up on me, Shelley, because you actually met the man. Still, there's a reason that I received the impressions that I have, so, in my own defense, it's not all my fault. My apologies, though.

>>Given the difficulties of deep ocean salvage, it's not likely that he would have received much of a return on the investment had he tried to turn the ship into a cash cow in any event.<<

As I said, it's not always a matter of money, but of ego. Just as it was for Ballard, I'm sure that he knew that he could have gone down through history as "the man who discovered the Titanic." For many, that is a viable and fair exchange for some monetary loss, so he wouldn't have totally been out, if you know what I mean.
 
Aug 29, 2000
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Oh I quite agree about the ego part of the equation. Success often seems to feed an already inflated one! I never met Cameron, but having talked to Grimm and Ballard on many occasions under various circumstances, I was relieved to witness more substance and genuine interest in the ship and exploration than often comes through in the media. I can't though, claim to be a huge fan of either although I applaud their tenacity and achievement. Human beings are complex animals.
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>I never claimed they did crave the limelight or the attention, but, money aside, many people like to "show off," and I've noticed that many of those who do have money.<<

No surprise there. I mean, who else would have the means to cobble together resources and gain the support of the "Right Poeple" needed to make anything happen? I don't think it's going to be Joe Trailerpark.
 
Feb 21, 2005
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Interestingly enough, Jack Grimm was living in Abeline, TX during his final years and somehow he got into contact with my grandfather (who was also an entrepeneur) and unfortunately sold him on some kind of bad business deal. Anyway, I was about 13 years old at the time and I talked with Mr. Grimm on several occasions and he was always very insistant even after the Ballard find, that he had been the one who had found the propeller blade to the Titanic. (which had already been proven as geographically impossible). He actually went to schools claiming the find and saying that Ballard was a hoax. This came from his own mouth. I had not done as much research at the time and sorta believed him until I got to reading and researching further. I don't want to say the man is a lair or anything to that extent, he was just very much a fabricator of certain truths. From his own point of view. Unfortunately, it was due to this business venture between my grandfather, Grimm, and Grimm's partner at the time Bunker Hunt, that my grandfater started losing his fortune is business deals started by Jack Grimm. The man was a great businessman, but when it came down to it, you really couldn't trust a word the man said. And this is from knowing him personally. I spoke with his wife a few times also and apparently from what she told me, he had always told her that there was an island nearby the find of the "propeller" which we know is not true. So it's up to everyone here to research and make their own opinion. Albeit Jack Grimm made one Hell of an attempt to find the greatest of all lost ships, but when he came up short he never would fess up and tried to make every young and older person in Texas anyway, believe that he had indeed been the one to find the Titanic and Ballard's expedition had been a complete fraud to screw Grimm and Co. out of their money and claim.

Regards,

Matt.
 
Feb 21, 2005
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On another note towards Mr. Grimms' distinguised career, he led several attempts and even thought he had found the final resting place of Noah's Ark. This I believe was after his "Titanic Venture". There are a couple of videos accounting Grimm's expeditions. One I believe is called "Search For The Titanic", and I believe the other is called "Return To Titanic" I know they were available as a 2-video set at one time. They're interesting and they really did the best they could. And honestly, what they found does look very much like the propeller blade of a very large ship, but the location of the "blade" was later looked at by Ballard I believe and it was determined that whatver it was they saw wasn't a propeller blade. Probably a rock or something. I know one expedition made it a point to go to Grimm's reported position to see what was there and they turned up empty. Grimm gave it a very good shot and was working with a lot of the top minds at the time, they just missed her by a few miles. Really a shame. But good for Ballard!
 
Jul 12, 2005
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Does anyone else remember Jack Grimm's "contest" to win a trip to the Titanic site on his last expedition? I fell victim to the siren's call of maybe going out on Grimm's ship and played the game week after week. Grimm published his clues each week in Globe magazine (that should have told me something right there!). I was able to crack the coded messages written by an ex-CIA code breaker and discovered the golden Titanic (actually a photo of a golden model Grimm had made for him by a jeweler)was in New York City in the Public Library. There were an infinite places to hide the photo and six million books, in case it was in a book (it was!). My plan was to be at the news stand in Grand Central Station the moment the latest shipment of Globe magazines arrived, crack the code, hurry over to the Public Library, find the photo and claim the prize. To my great disappointment, when I checked the classified ads in the magazine, there was no last clue! I called Grimm at his office in Texas, and he said he had missed the deadline to submit the ad! I searched high and low at the library, but without the name of the book, it was hopeless. Walter Lord said he had to come downtown to pick up some shirts and would search, too, but I told him it was hopeless without the name of the book. The next week, the clue was published in Globe, and three New Yorkers, who had gotten together just to win the contest, found the photo of the golden Titanic in Mayo's America of Yesterday! Grimm gave the three men the cash equivalent of the golden Titanic and kept it in a case in the lobby of his building in Texas. Robert H. Gibbons
 

Bob Godfrey

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So near and yet so far, Robert. If only you'd remembered that essential advice for a healthy diet - hold the Mayo and take the lettuce!
 
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