Jack Phillips' final moments

Arun Vajpey

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..........Continued from above

Immediately upon arriving on the bridge for his watch at 6pm, Lightoller directed 6th Officer Moody to let him know what time they should reach the vicinity of ice. After 30 or 45 minutes, Moody reported back, "About 11 o'clock." Lightoller claimed that he too had performed some mental calculations and decided that the time would be about 9.30 based on the only Marconigram that he had seen, from the "Caronia" (Lightoller at first said that he had calculated this before Moody had given him his time, but later corrected this saying that he had done so between 7 and 8pm). Lightoller did not correct Moody or ask him to repeat his calculations as the junior officer was busy "with some calculations, probably stellar calculations or bearings" and thought that he had used a different message, or messages than the one he had seen. However, the 2nd officer did not know what these could be as he had seen no other Marconigrams. Lightoller's memory must be faulty if he thought Moody was busy with position-related calculations before 7pm as the star sightings were not made until 7.30 - which the 2nd officer performed, with Pitman's help. Again, this strikes me an another Lightoller cover-up. Moody did not survive to confirm Lightoller's story and even if the latter had given his junior colleague that task, it is highly likely that it was not "immediately upon arriving on the bridge at 6 PM" but more likely closer to 8 PM. And having given Moody that task, what was the point in Lightoller doing his own calculations and (deliberately?) computing the wrong time to meet the ice field? IF, contrary to his claims Lightoller had known about the Californian's message that arrived on the bridge during his duty shift (and I believe that he knew), he could himself have made that calculation.....but had he testified doing so and calculated the right time, he would be asked on the basis on which he calculated it. Lightoller would have known that the Californian's wireless log would have shown the time they sent the message and received Titanic's response and so by deliberately 'calculating' the wrong time to meet the ice field, he was further covering himself IMO. Also, he probably did not know if Boxhall knew about the Californian's message and could not risk the Fourth officer suddenly 'recalling' it at the wrong time. As it happened, Boxhall did not give any clear account about that but had he done so and the committee had asked Lightoller for an explanation, he might have suggested that Moody - who, according to Lightoller - did the correct calculation might have seen the message. Like Murdoch, Moody would have been another non-surviving scapegoat. (See below)

Murdoch relieved Lightoller for dinner from 7.05 to 7.35; when he returned, the 2nd Officer was told of the drastic drop in temperature in those thirty minutes, but there was no mention of any new ice reports. Later, when it is claimed that the Captain came on to the bridge about 9pm, the discussion with Lightoller did not mention his computation of the time when he expected to reach the ice. Moody's errant calculation was not mentioned either. When the Captain left Lightoller on the bridge, the 2nd Officer asked Moody to contact the crow's nest to inform them to "keep a sharp look-out for ice, particularly small ice and growlers." This would be at 9.30pm, perhaps confirmation that Lightoller had indeed calculated the time and asked for extra vigilance at that exact time. Maybe; but Quartermaster Hichens says this order to the look-out was soon after he had come on duty at 8pm and after he had delivered a message to the ship's carpenter. Lightoller himself said the message to the carpenter was sent just before 8.55, which is when the Captain came on the bridge. This is perhaps a good example of the endemic imprecision of times and timings that night.
If Hichens was right, that order to the Crow's Nest was made at 8 pm, soon after someone on the bridge had time to read Californian's message and decide what to do. Hichens' statement upsets Lightoller's applecart because when the QM came on duty, Murdoch was definitely not on the bridge. Also, this fits in with my conjecture above that the time Lightoller asked Moody to do those calculations was closer to 8 pm and soon after arrival of the Californain message which Lightoller claimed that he never saw.

Boxhall had taken over the computations of the ship's position at 8pm to 10pm. While in the room, no ice messages were handed in, and he admitted that he did not look at the chart when he came on watch. He did not remember any marks on the chart that had been made before he took over (that is, from 6 to 8pm). Somewhere about 10pm, Boxhall submitted his position to the Captain who marked it on the chart himself but the 4th Officer did not take much notice whether any other positions were put on or not. [Boxhall also said he gave Lightoller the final position before 10pm; a minor point, but the 2nd officer did not mention this.]
This is another incident that flies in the face of Lightoller's time statements. If Boxhall was right, it suggests that Captain Smith was still around the bridge and chart room by 10 pm and did not go back to his cabin at 9:25 pm like Lightoller claimed. It could also lend support to the theory that after meeting Lightoller on the bridge, Smith went back to the Wideners' party.

Finally, at 10pm, Lightoller's watch came to an end and he was relieved by Murdoch. At the British Inquiry, the 2nd Officer stated that he may have mentioned his or Moody's timing calculations, but again, he couldn't be sure: at one point in the US proceedings, he said Murdoch was informed of the anticipated time of intercept with the ice by the 2nd officer, but he gave Moody's 11pm timing, not his own, and one wonders why, as a premature, earlier time would be more of a forewarning. When one scours the transcripts, the answer becomes clearer, as Lightoller never once mentioned his own 9.30pm estimate in America! Was this a later invention based on information he had gleaned in the interim until he spoke in London? Lightoller did apparently say that they might be up around the ice at any time, or were in the ice region; his memory faltered on the exact words he used. What does stand out is that on the very first day of the US Inquiry, which was some weeks before his questioning in London, he denied talking with Murdoch about the iceberg situation, and Murdoch did not ask him. All that was talked about was the clear weather. Perhaps evasively, when this contradiction was brought up in London, Lightoller replied, "I may say by the questions that were put to me that those answers you might agree were correct as far as I understood the questions at that time" and explained that his US answer was "incomplete." An impartial reading of the testimony does not bear this out, and as will be seen soon, Lightoller was evasive on that very first day ashore of ice warnings.
I think this last paragraph is more than self-explanatory.
 
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Mike Spooner

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The more I hear of officers and wireless operators all blaming each others. Then the captain handing over a ice messengers to a non paying first class passengers Mr B Ismay and not handing on straight to the bridge. This sounds like a right carry on film here!
I hate say there is only one person to blame here. That is the Master and God of the ship who has failed to have full proper control over the incoming ice warnings from the wireless room. That the well paid messengers from the first class passengers has taken preference over the ice warnings!
 

Arun Vajpey

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I hate say there is only one person to blame here. That is the Master and God of the ship who has failed to have full proper control over the incoming ice warnings from the wireless room. That the well paid messengers from the first class passengers has taken preference over the ice warnings!
I know what you mean but to accuse Smith of being solely responsible is unfair IMO. Remember that the Titanic was a luxurious passenger liner and not a military vessel. Therefore, rightly or wrongly the Captain would have had to fulfill certain social obligations to some of the passengers and so could not be seen as too rigid. Stanley Lord, who commanded the Californian - basically a cargo ship with the 'option' of passenger accommodation - could get away with being a martinet but not Smith.

In bringing Wilde with him from the Olympic, Smith probably expected the Chief Officer to handle most of the day-to-day running of the ship while he himself remained in the background hobnobbing with the passengers but available immediately when required. That sort of attitude would be completely unacceptable in our day and age with its emphasis on health and safety above all but a hundred plus years ago attitudes were different.

Captain William Turner of the Lusitania is more my idea of a 'real' Captain of a ship. He had a healthy disdain of over-rich and demanding passengers and let the Executive Captain (or Staff Captain) James Anderson do the socializing bit.
 

Mike Spooner

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I am sorry to say that is part and parcel of a captain role having to take the full responsibilities of the ship and very well paid for the job to!
It may well be a luxury liner and having to please the first class passengers with a false face. As I can imagine this rich wealthy passengers have power in their hands and can be been rather demanding and arrogant at the best of times. Yet a captain must restrain himself at all times.
Never less if he is relying on wireless massagers for ice warning ahead therefore should of had better control over the two operators. Or make sure his senior officers understand the situation well too.
Then the incorrect navigation in progress. Again the responsibilities is on the captain to check for himself to.
Captain life can be rather a lonely one at the best of times having to distance your self from the officers of not been too paly with them. Yet at the same time you must show you are the one in charge at all times.
 

Julian Atkins

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Hi Arun,

You have provided a most interesting discourse on Paul Lee's research. Well done!

It is quite clear to me that Bride never took to the bridge The Californian's message to The Antillian. Rather than concentrate on Lightoller's shifty positioning, that of Bride in his various testimonies is quite damning IMHO.

We know for sure Phillips never took to the bridge The Californian's final ice warning message around 11pm on the 14th because he sent Evans "DDD". Evans somewhat watered this down in his 2 testimonies (knobbled by Marconi?). Chris Burton, Marconi expert, was clearly of the view Evans had been sent "DDD" by Phillips.

As for The Mesaba ice warning message, Adams, the wireless operator, gave evidence of this to the British Inquiry, and got a reply that Phillips had got his message, then waited for an official reply from the Captain of Titanic, but none was forthcoming. He gave clear evidence that he heard Phillips continuing to work Cape Race; therefore by clear implication Phillips did not send the message to the bridge, and clearly no MSG from the bridge was sent by Phillips as a reply.

I have not the slightest doubt that Lightoller nor anyone else on the bridge knew nothing whatsoever of The Mesaba ice warning message, same as they knew nothing of the first ice warning message from The Californian, or it's 11pm ice warning message.

Cheers,

Julian
 

Arun Vajpey

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Hi Julian

I am sure that you are entitled to your opinions and I am to mine. Apart from the fact that a lot of 'evidence' is based on verbal statements by various crew members, we are almost 107 years down the line.

I have no doubt that Phillips and Bride did not perform their duties exactly according to protocol or even guidelines. Also, for his own reasons, Bride had certain 'holes' in his recollections in later testimonies. BUT, not matter how you look at it, Bride and Phillips, while being "accessories" to the cause, were definitely not the primary cause of the disaster.

IMO, Lightoller's actions give strong indications that he did know about the Californian's first ice warning (the one to Antillian). I do not believe that Phillips or Bride would have sent that 7:37 response to the Californian off their own backs and Lightoller was the SO on the bridge at the time. He probably thought he had taken sufficient precautionary measures to ensure the safety of the ship but when it subsequently turned out that this was not the case, he had to build a story to cover himself.

You can give Lightoller the benefit of doubt about the Mesaba message but once again, there is enough ambiguity in his actions and later statements to raise questions. I do not believe that lack of an official response from the Captain or the fact that Phillips continued to work on Cape Race is sufficient circumstantial evidence to believe that the message was not sent to the bridge. I do not believe that Phillips would have sent an MSG response without at least sending the relatd message to the bridge.

As I have said before, I (nor anyone else) has the slightest doubt that neither Phillips nor Bride took the Californian's second and final ice warning to the bridge. There was never any question about that.
 

Mike Spooner

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Add to the comments one of our members as found out that White Star had agreed a massager boy was to delivery the telegram messengers to the bridge. It would appear that never happen or they found it quicker to delivery themselves. If that was the case with one duty at the time the wireless room would be left untended for incoming messages.
Then if the message boy was doing his job, how an earth did Smith landed up giving a telegram message to Mr B Ismay?
So for the blame game White Star are at fault here, or I hate to say Smith should of made sure the messenger boys were on call for 24 hours!
 
A

Aaron_2016

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Harold Bride described the process of delivering messages to the bridge e.g.

Q - There is not any ship’s messenger, or boy who does this? You do it yourself?
A - Well, you can have one, but by the time you have rung for him to come up, and he has come up, you could have taken it yourself and be back again.

Q - You are close to him?
A - We are close to the Captain on the Titanic.

Q - And would it be part of the duty of you or Phillips, as the case may be, to get such messages delivered?
A - Yes.

Q - If the message is addressed to the Captain, is it your duty to give it to him personally, or where do you put it, or what do you do with it?
A - It is our duty to ascertain somehow or other, that the message is delivered to the Captain to give it to a responsible man, the Captain’s steward, or take it ourselves.

"I saw the captain's messages. I was delivering them for Mr. Phillips."

"There was a message delivered to the captain in the afternoon, sir, late in the afternoon, regarding the ice field."

Q - From whom?
A - From the Californian, sir.......I received that message myself and delivered it to the captain......I acknowledged it to the Californian before I delivered it."

Q - You acknowledged it?
A - I acknowledged the receipt of it.
Q - How much time elapsed while you were waiting to confirm this report through the Baltic?
A - I did not confirm it through the Baltic. I confirmed it direct to the Californian.
Q - Confirmed it with the Californian?
A - Yes, sir.
Q - In your acknowledgement?
A - Yes, sir.
Q - How much time elapsed?
A - I should say about four minutes.
Q - What did you say in confirming this report to the Californian?
A - I gave the usual acknowledgement of receipt, "R. D.," the Marconi signal. (Phillips did the same thing with the Mesaba ice warning)
Q - R. D. indicates "received"?
A - Yes, sir.
Q - And you said nothing more?
A - Nothing more. (Phillips also said nothing more in his response to the Mesaba)
Q - But you are certain that the Californian knew that you had this message?
A - Yes, sir.

"I made it on a slip of paper and handed it to the bridge."

Q - You took that message to the captain?
A - The officer on the bridge?

Q - What was your practice when you got a message?
A - If it was for the navigating staff or the Captain we delivered it personally.

Q - Could you tell us how long it was after you got the message that you delivered it on the bridge?
A - About two minutes.

Q - Did it strike you as an important message?
A - Well, those sort of messages are looked upon as important.

Q - So that you would deliver it as soon as you could?
A - Yes.

Q - All that you would have to do is to take down the message and go from your room on to the bridge to deliver it to the officer?
A - Yes.

I believe the above account is a strong indication that Phillips did receive and deliver the ice warning from the Mesaba to the bridge of the Titanic. Whether Lightoller or Murdoch received it, is quite debatable, but one of them should have acted upon it. Similar to the haze that was seen right ahead by the ship's lookouts from 10pm onwards. If the surviving officers were willing to deny the haze, then there is a good indication that they were willing to deny the Mesaba ice warning as well. No reason to put their careers in great jeopardy. As Lightoller said they were looking for - "A pinning down of blame onto someone's luckless shoulders." I believe none of them wanted the responsibility of accepting 1,500 deaths on their record.
 
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Arun Vajpey

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I believe the above account is a strong indication that Phillips did receive and deliver the ice warning from the Mesaba to the bridge of the Titanic. Whether Lightoller or Murdoch received it, is quite debatable, but one of them should have acted upon it. Similar to the haze that was seen right ahead by the ship's lookouts from 10pm onwards. If the surviving officers were willing to deny the haze, then there is a good indication that they were willing to deny the Mesaba ice warning as well. No reason to put their careers in great jeopardy. As Lightoller said they were looking for - "A pinning down of blame onto someone's luckless shoulders." I believe none of them wanted the responsibility of accepting 1,500 deaths on their record.
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I agree to this but strongly feel that the Mesaba message was received by Lightoller and not Murdoch, the former being the SO on watch at the time. I also believe that with his mind on other issues like freezing of fresh water and liaising with the lookouts, he neglected to post or even share it. In Paul Lee's article there is mention of how Lightoller gave statements about asking Moody to calculate when they would reach the ice field only to disagree with him, how Murdoch relieved him at a crucial time to have dinner and then being rather vague about what he told the First Officer about the ice warnings. You might just accept one of those statements but taken together, one cannot but get the feeling that Lightoller was covering up for himself, subtly passing the blame (while not appearing to actually do so) to men like Murdoch and Moody who did not survive and so were not in a position to contradict him.
 
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Julian Atkins

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Hi Aaron,

At the British Inquiry Bride was recalled for a final time on Day 14/23rd May and cross examined as to whom he actually delivered The Californian - Antillian ice warning message on the bridge:-

16412. What did you do when you got that message?
- I delivered it to the Officer on the bridge.

16413. Do you remember who the Officer on the bridge was?
- No, I was not acquainted with the Officers.


16414. But whatever it was, I understand it was the ice report which you have told us of, and you delivered that at once to the Officer on the bridge?
- Yes.

Lots of commentators and researchers regard the above exchange as indicating Bride lied. They state it was inconceivable that Bride would not have known to whom he delivered the message on the bridge.

When you look at the totality of Bride' testimony, one cannot but help but find it very poor, and one can drive a proverbial 'coach and horses' through much of it.

Cheers,

Julian
 
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Rob Lawes

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A - I gave the usual acknowledgement of receipt, "R. D.," the Marconi signal. (Phillips did the same thing with the Mesaba ice warning)
Q - R. D. indicates "received"?
A - Yes, sir.
Q - And you said nothing more?
A - Nothing more. (Phillips also said nothing more in his response to the Mesaba)
SS Mesaba Marconi Operator Stanley Adams.

22052. The operator (Phillips) - "was very busy with Cape Race. Time of communication, 7.50 p.m. New York time (9.40 ship's.) sending ice report, after which he (Phillips) went on working to Cape Race again"?
- That is so.

22053. That is subscribed by you?
- Yes.

Difficult to deliver a message and continue to work Cape Race at the same time.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Difficult to deliver a message and continue to work Cape Race at the same time.
Yes, but only if Phillips himself was delivering it. Remember that the Mesaba message arrived at the Titanic's wireless room at 9:52 pm, a time at which most people, including the wireless operators would have finished dinner but not yet retired to bed. It is more than likely that the off duty Bride was not fast asleep when it arrived. It would have been logical for Phillips to acknowledge the message and hand it to Bride to deliver it to the bridge, which was quite close by while he (Phillips) himself continued to work on Cape Race.. By then Lightoller was getting ready to complete his shift and retire and having already taken some precautions about the ice - like warning the lookouts to keep watch for it, instructed Hemming about the risk of fresh water freezing etc - likely put the Mesaba message away somewhere,maybe even in his pocket and did not share it with anyone. Lightoller was very vague later when asked if he had shared any ice warning with Murdoch during the 10 pm handover and took refuge in the ""I cannot recall" phrase.

Julian seems hell bent on blaming the two wireless operators almost entirely for the disaster and loss of lives. While I do not deny that they were far from properly organised and had to accept some responsibility, IMO it is a bit extreme to claim that most ice warnings were not delivered to the bridge simply to magnify the wireless operators' culpability. I agree with Julian that Bride's statements during the inquiries were inconsistent and ambiguous but if one could drive the "proverbial coach and horses" through them, then one could sail the entire Titanic through Lightoller's statements.
 
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Aaron_2016

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Hi Aaron,

At the British Inquiry Bride was recalled for a final time on Day 14/23rd May and cross examined as to whom he actually delivered The Californian - Antillian ice warning message on the bridge:-

16412. What did you do when you got that message?
- I delivered it to the Officer on the bridge.

16413. Do you remember who the Officer on the bridge was?
- No, I was not acquainted with the Officers.


16414. But whatever it was, I understand it was the ice report which you have told us of, and you delivered that at once to the Officer on the bridge?
- Yes.

Lots of commentators and researchers regard the above exchange as indicating Bride lied. They state it was inconceivable that Bride would not have known to whom he delivered the message on the bridge.

When you look at the totality of Bride' testimony, one cannot but help but find it very poor, and one can drive a proverbial 'coach and horses' through much of it.

Cheers,

Julian
Bride did not know the names of the officers. Easy to understand why. I worked in a hospital for 14 years and worked with many colleagues on a regular daily basis, yet I only knew a handful of their names. I knew them all by sight, but for all the years we worked together we never exchanged in social conversation and thus never knew each other's names.

Bride was asked at the US Inquiry:

Q - Was that officer Murdoch?
A - I could not tell you, sir.
Q - Do you know Mr. Murdoch?
A - No, sir; I know the officers by sight, but I do not know their names.
Q - Did you communicate this message to the captain?
A - No, sir; I gave it to the officer on watch, sir.

Lightoller knew the officers by sight, but I'm sure he would struggle to remember their surnames if they never met before the voyage or never cared to socialise. e.g.

Lightoller
Q - Are you quite well acquainted with the officers of this company?
A - I naturally know them by sight.

Similar to the other crew e.g.

Mr. Jones
Q - Do you know the man who was the lookout?
A - No, sir; I only knew him by sight.

Mr. Haines
Q - You do not remember just who they were?
A - I know their faces; but I do not know their names, sir.

I believe this could be the reason why Hichens was heard in the lifeboat as he called out to another lifeboat and he wanted to know which officer was supposed to be in charge at the time of the collision. He probably knew it was Murdoch by his voice and his face, but he could not be certain what his surname was.

Overall I think there is grounds to believe that Bride did not know which officer he delivered the message to, especially if it was dark, and if the officer was buttoned up good and tight with his coat collar pulled up because it was so cold, I'm sure most men would struggle to remember who the officer was, and Bride was only too glad to rush back inside and out of the cold.
 
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Julian Atkins

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Absolutely spot on there Rob!

And what does Bride do when he hears The Californian ice warning message also sent to The Antillian? He ignores it and carries on with his making up his accounts, or may even have ignored it then gone for his meal break.

We can piece together what Evans probably did, though he never admitted it in his testimony - he probably sent out a number of ice warning messages to various ships of the 3 bergs seen 5 miles southwards, same as Adams on Mesaba did.

I am following Arun's line of thought quite carefully, and after Bride was recalled for the final time on 23rd May 1912, he was followed by Lightoller being recalled. He had listened to Bride giving his testimony for the final time, and surprise surprise Lightoller's meal break was at the time of Bride's acknowledgement of The Californian - Antillian message! So if Bride took the message to the bridge it would have been Murdoch or Lowe to whom it was delivered to, if Lightoller was telling the truth.

But Evans had sent the message to The Antillian at 5.35pm NYT. The original Marconi Service Form has survived and is reproduced in 'Titanic - Signals of Disaster', author John Booth.

I think both Evans and Bride were nobbled over this by Marconi. Luckily for Evans and Marconi, Evans' own PV of The Californian was not as detailed as John Durrant's on The Mount Temple. But there are lots of hints if you look for them such as the TRs between The Californian and Titanic.

Cheers,

Julian
 

Rob Lawes

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. It would have been logical for Phillips to acknowledge the message and hand it to Bride to deliver it to the bridge, which was quite close by while he (Phillips) himself continued to work on Cape Race..
None of that matches Brides testimony:

Mr. BRIDE.
I was on duty for half an hour, sir, while Mr. Phillips went and had his dinner.

Senator SMITH.
At what hour?

Mr. BRIDE.
From 7 o'clock until half-past.

Senator SMITH.
Where were you after that, up to the time of the collision?

Mr. BRIDE.
At the time of the collision?

Senator SMITH.
Up to the time of the collision.

Mr. BRIDE.
I was in bed.

Senator SMITH.
You had retired?

Mr. BRIDE.
Yes, sir.

He would have no reason to deny delivering any message to the bridge and in fact every reason to say he did his duty.

I don't think, (or I believe neither does Julian) that Phillips and Bride were entirely responsible. I feel, in accident investigation terms, their actions would have been described as contributing factors. That is factors that, while not completely responsible for the disaster, would have contributed to the likelihood of its occurrence.
 
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Aaron_2016

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SS Mesaba Marconi Operator Stanley Adams.

22052. The operator (Phillips) - "was very busy with Cape Race. Time of communication, 7.50 p.m. New York time (9.40 ship's.) sending ice report, after which he (Phillips) went on working to Cape Race again"?
- That is so.

22053. That is subscribed by you?
- Yes.

Difficult to deliver a message and continue to work Cape Race at the same time.
How long did Adams listen to Phillips receive messages from Cape Race? Phillips might have told Cape Race to standby 10 minutes later and delivered the message and then continued. Cape Race may have sent messages to Phillips while he popped out to deliver the message to the bridge and then returned and asked Cape Race to repeat their last message. The Californian message was recorded "somewhere between 20 and 30 minutes" - (Bride) after it was first received. Phillips may have delivered the message at any time between the moment it was received and the moment the iceberg struck. Bride said Phillips had finished working Cape Race 10 minutes before the collision. If Phillips still had not delivered it before that time, he had an opportunity to do so then.

Bride said - "Those sort of messages are looked upon as important."
Q - So that you would deliver it as soon as you could?
A - Yes.

Adams could have listened in for a few short minutes and then started another duty. There is little reason to believe Adams paid close attention to the Cape Race messages that were continually being sent to the Titanic after 10 or 20 minutes, or longer, after it was first received by Phillips. I believe there was plenty of time and opportunity for Phillips to deliver the message to the bridge. Whether Lightoller or Murdoch failed to take it seriously is unknown.

The finger of blame was stacked high against the officer in charge. Nobody doubled the lookout. Lightoller and Boxhall apparently saw no haze, despite their lookouts seeing it from 10pm onwards. Nobody on the bridge apparently received the crucial ice warning from the Mesaba.

As survivor Frank Prentice once said - "I blame the bridge. That ship was thrown away."
 
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Rob Lawes

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Adams could have listened in for a few short minutes and then started another duty. There is little reason to believe Adams paid close attention to the Cape Race messages that were continually being sent to the Titanic after 10 or 20 minutes, or longer, after it was first received by Phillips.
Adams clearly states he was listening out for any response from the Titanic.

There is no evidence to support any of your statements above.

Furthermore, there is strong evidence to suggest that the bridge never received the message and at the very least Lightoller never received it.
 
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Aaron_2016

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Adams clearly states he was listening out for any response from the Titanic.

There is no evidence to support any of your statements above.

Furthermore, there is strong evidence to suggest that the bridge never received the message and at the very least Lightoller never received it.
There is no evidence that it was not delivered. So nobody can say for sure what happened. Adams did not say how long he was waiting for a reply. We assume he waited for a reply because he said he did, and we can only assume without any proof that he did wait, but for how long, we simply don't know. Lightoller said Phillips had accidentally forgot to deliver it to the bridge and told him with his dying breath that he put it under a paperweight and forgot about it. We have no idea if Lightoller heard correctly or if that entire conversation was a work of fiction, and Lightoller seemed pretty confident that he was on duty when the message was received.

"I was the officer of the watch and in charge of the ship when that message came over."

.
 
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