Jack Ryerson

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JMANCKIY

Guest
COULD ANY ONE TELL ME WHY JACK RYERSON HAD TROUBLE ENTERING BOAT NO. 4 WHITH HIS MOTHER.
 
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Issac

Guest
Second Officer Lightoller considered him a man and since on the port side, it was women and children first, Lightoller didn't want to let him in.
 
Mar 26, 2001
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The reason Lightoller probably relented when Arthur Ryerson demanded entry into a boat for his son, Jack was he might have been made aware of the fact that the Ryerson family were going back to the States to bury their oldest son, Arthur Jr. who had just been killed in an automobile accident. Also, at that late stage in the sinking, Mr. Ryerson had to have been aware of how slim his chances now were and was determined to make sure that at least one male family member would be left to support his wife and daughters.
 
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Jessie Manckiy (Jmanckiy)

Guest
COLUD ANYONE TELL ME WHAT HAPPENED TO JACK RYERSON AND HIS MOTHER AFTER THE SINKING OF THE TITANIC.

THANK YOU

JM
 

Phillip Gowan

Member
Apr 10, 2001
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John Borie (Jack) Ryerson became a well-known golfer and investor. He married Jane Morris late in life and they had no children. He died in West Palm Beach, Florida on January 21, 1986 at the age of 87.

His mother, Emily Maria Borie Ryerson was later married to Forsythe Sherfesee, a much younger man. They spent much of their time in Europe and traveling through other parts of the world. She died in Montevideo, Uruguay on December 18, 1939 at the age of 76. Her body was brought back and buried in the family plot in Cooperstown, New York.
 
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Stephen Trois

Guest
Hey david, a member of my church is a ryerson
or more corectly a payton,
the church it's self was home to a Ryerson-Rutter.
this was un known to my freind when she joined.

you seem to be interested in Phila area people hope this is news to you
SET
 

Kyrila Scully

Member
Apr 15, 2001
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South Florida
I was driving in Palm Beach today and passed by the street where Jack Ryerson spent his final days on earth. I took a picture which I hope isn't too big to fit, or else I can email it to you separately if you're interested.

The house is a two story stucco with red clay tile roof, lush tropical landscape, approx. 35-4,000 sq. ft. Surrounded by hedges and accessible by a black, wrought-iron gate between brick pillars topped with plaster urns. A nice little "cottage" just steps away from the ocean, and I thought about it as I turned the corner just a couple of houses away and saw the Atlantic Ocean at a flat calm. I wondered if Jack ever thought about that night in 1912 as gazed out over the sea. He must have frequently visited the ocean, being so close to the beach. You can hear the waves from that distance as they crash into the sand.

By the way, does anyone know who Noreen McKeen might be? She was listed as the resident-owner on Jack's death certificate. I did not see her name listed among family.

Kyrila
 
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Geoffrey Todd Bennett

Guest
I live in Fort Lauderdale and would love to see the last home of Jack Ryerson....are you able to give out the address?
 

Lee Gilliland

Member
Feb 14, 2003
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Just out of sheer curiosity, does anyone know of a connection between Ryerson College in Toronto Canada and the Titanic Ryersons?
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
I was just wondering what Master Ryerson did after he board boat 4. Following Mrs. Ryerson affidavit, he stayed close to his governess but I don't know if he helped rowing the boat or if he chatted with Master Carter during the time they stayed in the lifeboat. Did they know each other, provided they were nearby the same age?

Regards, João
 
Dec 2, 2000
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Easley South Carolina
>>Any answer?<<

I don't know that any answer even exists. With 712 survivors, it's just not possible to know the details of what each and every one of them did. Other then a possible turn at the oars, there wasn't really a lot any of them could do but sit and wait for rescue.
 
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João Carlos Pereira Martins

Guest
Sorry if my question was pointless, but I had the following thought: besides the crewmen and the second class little boys, they were the only male passengers in a boat full of women. They could help manouvering the oars and cooperate with the crew members. I don't know if the seamen had a different attitude with them just because they were males and I can't imagine what kind of behave they had during this time. I know that many men in the starboard early boats had an active role in the decisions, I don't know if that is the case. Thanks very much.

Regards, João
 
May 1, 2004
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I don't think your question was pointless but answerless. Unless Ryerson, Carter, a crewman or the surviving women wrote about their plight (a letter or article) and those words turn up one day,we won't know what the boys did. We can only guess. I think if they could pull on an oar or keep the younger children calm and still, they did do it and the crew members would have appreciated it.

If Lee is still with us:

Ryerson University and Ryerson Press (the 'Ryerson' in McGraw Hill/Ryerson) were named after the Rev. Edgerton Ryerson, a 19th century Methodist minister and educational reformer in Upper Canada (now Ontario). He was at the forefront for having non-denominational public schools. (non-denominational as in 'not just Anglicans' in charge) I don't know if his family tree is connected to that of the Ryersons who were Titanic passengers or to the steward Ryerson.
Ryerson Polytechnical Institute was a respected school, and still is respected as a university. Toronto's proud of their graduates.