Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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For those who wonder what the famous Titanic victim's work was like, go to Jacques Futrelle for a collection of stories.

I've not read any yet. I wonder how he compares with Conan Doyle and his Sherlock Holmes.
 

Mike Herbold

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Dec 13, 1999
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Dave:
Your post inspired me to re-read "My Lady's Garter" on a recent long-distance flight. Futrelle struts his vocabulary like a peacock at times, but, all in all, he weaves a good tale, with numerous plot and character twists. He has a very subtle sense of humor that sneaks up on you. He also likes to incorporate his home area of Massachusetts into the story, including his own "Stepping Stones" address.

Unfortunately Futrelle had only written a few books before his life was cut short by the Titanic disaster, so it's hard to compare his limited offerings to Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's lengthy Sherloch Holmes series. Interestingly, in "My Lady's Garter," the assumed bad guy turns out to be the true Holmes-like character in the end.

This book makes me want to hunt down more of his other material.

Recently I bought a copy of "Who's Who In America, 1912-1913," which was published before the Titanic sank, and found both Jacques Futrelle and his wife May listed as prominent authors. This surprised me, because I thought his work didn't become famous until after the disaster.
 

Mike Herbold

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Dec 13, 1999
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Dave, and also Phil Hind:
Finally got on the Jacques Futrelle website:
This is an excellent site, and should be linked both to his biography and in the Links section.
 
Mar 20, 2000
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Mike,

From what I've recently found, Jacques Futrelle had first risen to fame as a writer of short stories, literally hundreds of them for The Saturday Evening Post and other magazines.

It is very frank of you to admit that you assumed Futrelle was only well known AFTER the Titanic. This is the attitude of so many of us toward all of the better known figures on Titanic. Not that it applies to you, but for a lot of us I think this is because we are so caught up with the story of Titanic and know so little else about that era that we sometimes have a hard time imagining her people outside the context of the disaster.

Futrelle was already an established writer, with a wide readership, albeit a relatively "new" one, but think how relatively "new" Conan-Doyle was in 1912. We think of Conan-Doyle in a larger context because his career was not cut short. Still, Futrelle is included in several notable anthologies of great 20th century writers. I believe some reviews of his work are online and give a good overview of his career. In my own research, I've come across several old films of the silent era (and one I think from early sound) based on his books and stories.

Frank Millet's fame is also often considered a mediocre one or at least one that never reached it's full blossom. This is far from the truth. Millet's reputation was stellar and widely acknowledged. Even if his output was comparitively restrained and intermittent,Millet was still a major figure in the arts of his day. In his case, he'd already led a long life but because he died in such a legendary disaster, that's what people remember best.

So much is made about prominent Americans on Titanic, but really the most famous man aboard was British. Without question William Thomas Stead was a giant in media and political circles, a social activist of wide range, a hugely controversial, outspoken character, a greatly loved yet much criticized public figure, but sadly a man who today is almost totally unremembered, even among Titanic enthusiasts.

The list goes on...

Randy
 
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Regina Arlene Wilson

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Virgin poster here!

Hello. Can anyone assist me? I've been searching for stories and information on Jacques Futrelle. I was told of him and his works my my grandmother when I was growing up. I believe I am a descendent from what I've been told, how can I find this out? I also have an interest in writing as does my son and thought it could be interested to be placed on the family tree as I could fill in the last few generations of the tree...or at least help out. I am also interested in my son rewriting some of the work in a modern way and wondered if this is possible as we believe we are descendents from Jacques. Please can anyone help?

Regina Wilson
 
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Regina Arlene Wilson

Guest
Hello. Can anyone assist me? I've been searching for stories and information on Jacques Futrelle. I was told of him and his works my my grandmother when I was growing up. I believe I am a descendent from what I've been told, how can I find this out? I also have an interest in writing as does my son and thought it could be interested to be placed on the family tree as I could fill in the last few generations of the tree...or at least help out. I am also interested in my son rewriting some of the work in a modern way and wondered if this is possible as we believe we are descendents from Jacques. Please can anyone help?

Regina Wilson
 

Dave Gittins

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Mar 16, 2000
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Regina, the way to do this is to work backwards from yourself. Records of your ancestors will be on public records, though this varies quite a bit, depending on where you live. There is probably a genealogy club of some sort in your area that could guide you. Forget family traditions. What you need are documented facts. Be prepared to spend a good deal of time and a bit of money.

Futrelle's work is out of copyright, so there's nothing to stop anybody reworking it. You can get an idea of his stories from the Internet, as most of them are online. I don't have the URL, but a search for "The Phantom Motor" will soon find it.
 
Jul 12, 2003
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Regina: If you are interested in any genealogical connections for Jacques Futrelle, I would suggest starting your search with sites specifically geared for such research. You can try www.ancestry.com or www.rootsweb.com or www.familysearch.org.

You can also do what I have done (with success)and that is to write to people with the Futrelle surname, explain your goals and see what happens.

Do you know or have any idea how you are connected to him? Your posting says something about filling in the last few generations.

www.cyndislist.com is an excellent genealogy site for researching and learning how to go about it.

Hope this helps.
 
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Regina Arlene Wilson

Guest
I believe that Jacque Futrelle is related to my grandmother, Vera May Futrelle, as she mentioned it when i was young and used to read me his stories. I believe hes her uncle and I can update alot of the family tree from my grandmothers side, tho she sadly passed on now. My grandmother was born May 21, 1910 and was an only child, dont know her mums name or dads name which could be a sibling to Jacque. How difficult this has been to try to learn the truth!!!

Regi
 

Inger Sheil

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Feb 9, 1999
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Hallo Regina, and welcome to the board.

I've amalgamated your posts and the responses you've recieved so far into the one thread - this should enhance your chances of getting a response, and will keep the answers in the one place for anyone else who is interested at a future date in reading or responding to your post.

I wish you every success in getting an answer to your query!
 
Mar 30, 1997
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His parents full names are Wiley Harmon Heath Futrelle (although you will usually see it as Wiley H.H. Futrelle or some variation) and Linnie Bevill. He had at least one sister, Alberta Futrelle, who married Charles Copeland.

Good luck.
 
Apr 2, 2005
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This goes out to Regina Arlene Wilson who posted inquiries about Jacque Futrelle in May 2004. Jacque Futrelle was my great grandfather. Was wondering if you had been successful in finding out if you are in fact related?
 
Apr 8, 2003
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Need an interesting book to read??-I just finished reading Jacques Futrelle's My Lady's Garter. It wasnt what I'd call "couldn't put it down good" but still a good read. He definitely had a way with words!!
Interesting twists in the story made it kinda fun. I just wanted to get to "know" him a little better and thought reading one of his books would be a good way to do that.
 

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