James Moody's family

  • Thread starter Magda Natalia Piotrowska
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Magda Natalia Piotrowska

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Does anyone know what were names of Moody's siblings? And any any info about them?
Thanks and regards,
Magda
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Magda, did you email me via the 'On Watch' account with this question? If so, I did try to reply, but my email bounced back from the account.

John Henry and Evelyn Moody had four children - John, Margaret, Christopher and James.

I have a fair amount of data on each sibling and the family as a whole, but the family is a private one and I do not think it would be appropriate to divulge too much data in a public forum.
 
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Magda Natalia Piotrowska

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Thanks greatly, Inger!
Regards,
Magda
 

Inger Sheil

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No worries, Magda. I have the impression that the four siblings were close, judging from what the family has told me and from their correspondence, even thought two of them were to travel very far from England.
 

Hanna Turunen

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Mar 23, 2004
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Can anybody tell me when James Moody's siblings and parents are born? I like to know something about their life when James Moody lived? Where exactly James lived when he was in White Star Line?

I hope i get information of these questions, and don't wonder my bad English, I'm from Finland.

Thanks very much!
 
Jun 18, 2007
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James stayed with his uncle in Grimsby most of the time when not at sea, if I remember correctly.

And your English is actually very good, so there's nothing to worry about in that department!
 

Inger Sheil

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Hallo Hanna -

I'll have to dig up all the dates for you - I'm away from my notes.

James Moody used a shore address for his Aunt in Grimsby at St James' House (and her husband, who was James' uncle by marriage to her). He also lived towards the later years with one of his brothers, although he continued to use the St James' House address on official documents.
 
Apr 27, 2003
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Hanna and Kitrina - here is my information on Mr. Moody - there may be something to help you in there:

Moody, James Paul. Lived at St. James House, Grimsby. Occupation - 6th Officer RMS Titanic. 24 years old. (Born in Scarborough).

There is an inscription on a grave in the Dean Road Cemetery, Scarborough to Mr. Moody the inscription reads: Greater Love hath no man than this, that a man lay down his life for his friends.
also is an ornate plaque on the wall of the St Martin on the Hill church at Scarborough, Yorkshire.
also there is a lovely gold cross to the memory of Mr. Moody in Saint Augustines Church, Grimsby, Humberside.
Officer Moody served on the Royal Navy training ship HMS Conway in the River Mersey for two years from 1902 to 1903.
After the disaster his parents (sic) presented a cup which became known as the Moody Cup and was dedicated to his memory.
For many years it was the sailing dinghy trophy but after the Conway closed in 1974 this trophy was assigned to the Conway Club Association and is now awarded annually to the Old Conway belonging to that association who submits the best kept logbook. It is also known as the Moody Cup and is a prized trophy.
The cup is of silver and is inscribed on the front:
In Remembrance of
JAMES PAUL MOODY
1902-03
6th Officer of the Titanic
who was drowned doing his duty to the last,
when his ship went down after striking an iceberg,
on the 14th April 1912
"Quit Ye Like Men Be Strong''
(Conway motto from 1 Corinthians 16.13)
The back of the cup is inscribed:
HMS Conway
Challenge Trophy
For Sailing Dinghy Races
Winning Helmsmen
(Followed by names and year)
In earlier years a small replica was presented to the winning helmsman to keep.
THE Moody Cup* is now displayed in the Titanic exhibition at the Liverpool Maritime Museum, where it is on loan from the Conway Cruising Association.
The cup now stands on a new plinth which has silver panels around it on which are inscribed the names of the winners of the annual award for the best kept log.
Once a year it is taken from the Museum, presented to the winner, inscribed with the winner's name and then returned to the Museum for safekeeping and display.
I feel sure that the Titanic and Lusitania exhibition would be of interest to any of our members if they are in the vicinity of Liverpool.
*The large silver cup which is used as a prize in the Conway Cruising Association based at West Kirby Sailing Club, West Kirby, Wirral, Cheshire. It is awarded annually for the best kept log book of an Old Conway Person.

(From the Grimsby Evening News April 1912)
As a lad Mr. Moody served two years in HMS Conway a sail training vessel moored on the river Mersey, after that time he gained the Extra Certificate showing that he was bright. He joined the sailing vessel Boadicea on leaving, and would have served three years as apprentice and thus in 1906 came home to obtain his Second Mates ticket.

In July 1999 news came of a memorial in Scarborough's Woodlands cemetery with an inscription dedicated to Sixth Officer James Paul Moody, consisting of what was originally a cross style headstone. The inscription reads:
Also
In Loving Memory of
Her Youngest Son
James Paul Moody
Born 21st August 1887
Gave up his life
In the Sinking of the SS Titanic
April 15th 1912
"Greater Love Hath No Man Than This
That A Man Lay Down His Life For His Friends"

(From the Grimsby Evening News April 1912)
The Ill-Fated Titanic. Grimbarians on Board the Ship. Anxiety as to their Safety.
The Sixth Officer of the great liner is Mr. James Paul Moody, a nephew of Mrs. Arthur Mountain of St James House, with whom he stayed when in Grimsby. Mr. Moody who is twenty-four years of age had previously served for the space of some ten months on board the Oceanic of the same company. A letter was received from Mr. Moody only the day before the Titanic sailed from Southampton, and it is evident that Mr. Moody as was only naturally to be expected, was looking forward with keen interest to this, the maiden voyage of the world's largest passenger liner.
Probate Report: Moody, James Paul of 136 Fildes Street, Grimsby, Lincolnshire. Ships Officer. Probate registered: London 16th September 1912 to Christopher William Moody solicitors clerk and Margaret Moody spinster. Effects £449.8.8d.
(From Atlantic Daily Bulletin number 3 1993).
From Rev'd Anthony Stratford, SCARBOROUGH.
BTS Member Rev'd Tony Stafford a lifetime lover of ships, the sea and the Titanic has recently retired to Dulverton Hall, St. Martin's Square, Scarborough.
Opposite his retirement home is a fine pre-Raphacbite Church of St. Martin on the Hill. It is a place of pilgrimage for those interested in religious works of art and painting.
It should also be of real interest to BTS members visiting the resort, since there is a memorial tablet fixed to the Wall of the South Aisle that has a direct bearing on the Titanic tragedy.
Here is a copy of the inscription:

TO THE GLORY OF GOD AND IN AFFECTIONATE MEMORY OF
JAMES PAUL MOODY
6th Officer on the R.M.S. Titanic who was born in Scarborough on 21st August 1987 and went down with the ship on the 15th April 1912.

'BE THOU FAITHFUL UNTO DEATH AND I WILL GIVE THEE A CROWN OF LIFE'

It is understood that the Moody family were well known in Scarborough. I have been told that Jame's grandfather was a sometime Mayor of the town.
Scarborough is always worth a visit and if any BTS members are considering going there do have a look in the Church of St. Martin on the Hill and pay your respects to the above tablet.

(From the Scarborough Mercury Friday 19th April 1912.)
Mr. J. P. Moody
Son of Mr. J. Moody
We understand that Mr. J. P. Moody, one of the officers concerning whom no news has been received, is a son of Mr. J. Moody, solicitor, once in practice in Scarborough, and for some years a member of the Scarborough Town Council. The address at Grimsby is that of Mr. Moody's uncle, with whom he lived.
An uncle of Mr. Moody also resides on the South Cliff at Scarborough, and seen on Wednesday afternoon by one of our representatives, Mr. Moody said that the young officer was on board the Oceanic, and he had not heard that he had been transferred to the Titanic. he thought his nephew would have let him know of any change of ship, unless the change was made at the lost moment, so to speak.
Mr. James Paul Moody, the young officer in question, is well known in Scarborough, and he spent part of his holidays with his uncle and part with the latter's sister at Grimsby.
He was a tall, clean-shaven, smart-looking young man, and if his life has been lost great sympathy will be felt for his relatives. the uncle, when seen by our representative, said he had looked at the list of passengers and crew to see if there was anyone he knew, and although he saw the name of James Pellody he did not connect it with anyone in Scarborough, least of all his nephew.
''I hope it is not true,'' he said, and our representative could only echo the wish.

(From St James Parish Magazine May 1912)
Vicar's letter
The awful tragedy of the Titanic is so much in the minds of us all that I cannot help referring to it in my letter, if only to say how widespread and sincere is the sympathy felt for Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Mountain. Their nephew was Sixth officer of the ill-fated ship and he made his home in St. James House. His brother, C. W. Moody is organist at St. Augustine's where a beautiful memorial service was held.
There can be no doubt that every officer, engine man and many other men who died, died in the performance of their duty, giving up their lives for others and ''Greather love hath no man than this''.

(From Marjorie Moss 12th May 2002)
There is a new memorial in the Lifeboat House at Scarborough which was unveiled in April 2002 and reads:
HMS Conway Trust
Memorial
James Paul Moody O.C.
6th Officer Titanic
Born Scarborough, 21 August 1887
Roseberry House School, Scarborough
Scholarship HMS Conway 1902-3
Gained Masters Certificate April 1911
Posted from Oceanic to Titanic on her maiden voyage
Old Conway 6th officer,
White Star Line, Titanic
15th April 1912
HMS Conway motto ''Quit ye like men be strong''
1 Corinthians. Chapter 16 Verse 13.
James Paul Moody
This 24 year old Deck Officer took up his lifeboat duties after the ship struck an iceberg on her northerly course from Southampton to New York via Cobh. Clearing lifeboat after lifeboat with seamen under his command, knowing there were insufficient lifeboats for all on board. He stayed at his post until the every end, going down with the ship doing his duty.
'The Friends of HMS Conway Trust' in placing this plaque in James' town of birth are dutifully honouring his memory.
 

Inger Sheil

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Cheers for posting all those, Brian - I remember sending you notification about the headstone in 1999, and was present at the unveiling of the Conway memorial in 2002. There's a thread about it elsewhere on the board, along with a rather over-polished photo:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/discus/messages/5914/17148.html?1022270413

You're quite correct that Cup was not presented by his parents - it was a gift from his mother's family, who were very fond of him. I wrote an article for the Atlantic Daily Bulletin a little while ago that gave some more background on it. The Conways invited me to their annual presentation dinner for the cup back in 2000 - a thoroughly enjoyable event.

From memory, I think there may be another short piece on Moody in the parish magazine for St Augustine's as well as the St James piece - I went through years' worth of them back in 1999 to try and find some background to the memorial Altar set in St Augustines in Grimsby.

Moody's grandfather, after whom he was named, was not the Mayor of Scarborough (although one ancestor was the Mayor of Grimsby). He did, however, hold many influential civic positions in Scarborough, among them Town Clerk, in addition to his successful law practice. His son, Moody's father, served a stint as a town councillor.

I incorporated some of the background to the Scarborough Mercury article on his uncle William in a piece for the WSJ a couple of years back, including a photograph of the door of the house where the meeting with the reporter took place. There is also a photo of the house on the On Watch site.
 

Mauro Zungri

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Nov 2, 2004
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Hello! I am Mauro of Argentina and asked if somebody save something of Moody and its passage for Buenos Aires before 1912 Thanks! and they excuse by my inlges
MAURO
 

Inger Sheil

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Hallo Mauro - sorry I couldn't get back to you sooner, I've been on vacation.

As I mentioned to you in another thread, Moody made several visits to Argentina prior to joining the White Star Line. He spent much of his career on the very early oil tankers and tramp steamers that worked the South American runs, and spent a lot of time in South American ports, including Argentinian locales. I recall him saying rather complimentary things about Argentina - when I've had a chance to check his correspondence I'll give you a better idea of what he had to say about Buenos Aires.
 

Inger Sheil

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Expanding a bit on my last post, Mauro, I've had a chance to go back and re-read some of Moody's letters in which he mentions "Buenos Ayres" (his preferred version of Buenos Aires). He compares it favourably to South Africa, believing it was a 'nicer' area. He also calls Beunos Aires a 'splendid city', and once spent ten days there late in 1908 on leave before sailing home to England - he met up with a friend and had a rather a good time, which resulted in a delay so he didn't get home in time for Christmas.

I seem to recall that Joseph Boxhall, his brother-in-law, or both also sent postcards from Argentina that are still extant - will have to see if I can find them.
 

Mauro Zungri

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Nov 2, 2004
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Hello Inger and THANKS! by the information, I also hope to serve to him before any question. I wait for the news hers and other time thanks.
SORRY! by my ingles
 

Inger Sheil

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No problem at all, Mauro - if I find the Boxhall/Argentina references I'll send them along to you.
 

Inger Sheil

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Looking at my piles of papers here in dismay, Hanna - I don't fancy digging through them. I have a feeling it was 1857 or possibly '56, and this accords with a quick glance at the Census returns which give his age as 24 in 1881 and 34 in 1891. His mother was certainly born in 1857 (26 December, if memory serves).

You're showing a great deal of interest in the background and careers of the deck officers - would it be too intrusive to ask if you have a special project in mind?
 

Hanna Turunen

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Mar 23, 2004
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Okay, I think it was 1857 (if he was 24 in 1881
happy.gif
). Your memory was right, his mother was born in 26th December 1857
happy.gif
. It is easy to remember, on 26th December is Tapani's day here in Finland and it's holiday ;)! I don't know do you have got it and I don't know what it is in English :/.

Yeah, I'm interested in them. Nothing important at this time, but I have to do a essay in school (subject: history) sometimes on may or april, so I collect information now . I'm so lazy then...
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I have to tell in this essay some differences between real Titanic and movie Titanic too. So I think do you have got anything good sites or examples? I'm read this site's message boards about them, but do you have got something else to say
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?

Something is bothering me too. Were officers left- or right-handed? I'm always wondering it... In the Cameron's movie, Smith is left-handed.

And do they have got nicknames (especially Moody's and Lowe's)?

Could you say too, when James' siblings are born, please? You can say only year if you don't remember and you don't have to watch your papers if you don't know where they are. You have made much for me
happy.gif
, thanks to it!

And your website, On watch, is very good! But when you update it and who is your next officer? I know you're busy, but I just asked ;).
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo again Hanna - the project sounds very interesting! Our equivalent to Tapani's day is 'Boxing Day' or 'St Stephen's Day' on the 26 December. There are a couple of sites out there where variations between history and the fictionised movie story are discussed - I gather you just signed up on Andy Clarkson's 'Titanic-Titanic'?

I don't know if I've seen a record of whether the officers were left or right handed...photographs I can think of seem to indicate that they were right handed, but I'll have a flip through them again to see if there are any indications otherwise.

James Moody was known as 'Jim' (he also had family nicknames that I may incorporate in future articles). Harold Lowe did use another form of his name at the time of the Titanic disaster, but I'll divulge that in my book. I apologise if I seem a bit guarded, but I don't want to disclose too much information pre-publication (not to suggest you would fail to give due acknowledgement, but there are others out there that are less scrupulous!).

I'll look up the birthdates for Moody's siblings - I'm sorry I didn't get back to you the last time you asked the question.

I'm glad that you enjoyed On Watch! I'm afraid that I've been a bit distracted lately with other work and haven't put the finishing touches to the Boxhall bio I've been working on - I am set up with a scanner now, though, so I can add the images.
 

Hanna Turunen

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Mar 23, 2004
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Yeah, I signed up there, how do you know
happy.gif
? Okay, I have to go and look them.

I hope you put those James Moody's name in future articles.
 
A

Alyson Jones

Guest
I'm kind of like Hanna here,but in a different way. Did all the moody sibilings two brothers and one sister had alot of resemblace of James?. I have never seen a pic of his sibilings before and i have always wounded if they did look a like?

[Moderator's Note: This message, originally posted to an unrelated thread in a different subtopic, has been moved to this pre-existing thread discussing the Moody family. MAB]