James Paul Moody

Bob Godfrey

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Nov 22, 2002
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The acceptable age range for VAD nursing members was 21-48, but only those within the range 23-42 were considered for transfer overseas. My great grandmother was near the top end of the range even for 'home front' duties. Back home she still had children as young as 5, but as she had others aged up to 21 the family was able to take care of itself in the absence of both parents. Not a very happy situation for anybody, but those were times when most people knew their duty and didn't flinch from it.
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Dave Gittins

Member
Apr 11, 2001
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It's possible that stewardess Evelyn Marsden served with the VAD.

On 31 May 1915, she made a will in which she said she was about to return to England. Reputedly, she was going to serve with the Red Cross. She is said to have been a trained nurse. (Some of my sources are not entirely satisfactory).

From Australian military records I know that she did go to England, where she lived with her mother-in-law in Monmouthshire.

I've taken the story as far as I can from my end. Anybody is welcome to take it further if they can. I believe VAD records are not very complete.
 

Lauren moody

Member
Apr 1, 2008
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heya i'm lauren
i'm related to james moody the 6th officer on the titanic and i'm writing a book about him so i'm gathering information up, so i was wondering if anyone had anyinformation that i could possibly use, i'll be very grateful!!! thanks
lauren

[Moderator's Note: This post, originally posted in another thread has been moved to the pre-existing one, which is discussing the same deck officer. JDT]
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo Lauren -

Delighted to see a relative here - I've met/interviewed quite a few members of the Moody family. What is your relationship to the Sixth Officer?
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Hey Titanic lover's.

I,m new here and i James paul moody is my fav officer. I know alot about him only about his work duties.I research James moody on the internet, but i got a funnie feeling you guys know more about him and maybe one of you guys know what kind of person he was. The internetgives you only liminated information.
Do one of you guys have pics of him, i got one when he was young and in a sailors unifrom and one when he was a young man i think in a white star unifrom and one standing out side of saint ?house grimsy,and any one got pics of his bros and sister and mother and father.
I just want to learn more of him and i think you guys might be able to supply some answers. cheers

PS sorry if i got spelling mistakes, i'm a bad speller. Cheers.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo Alyson, and welcome to ET -

Those sound like the photographs I've posted online and in articles. I do have photographs of members of his family, and may use them in articles one day.

Have a look around the messageboard and you'll find that many aspects of Moody's life and personality have been discussed here. If you haven't read it already, here is an article on the ET site about his first voyage in sail:

https://www.encyclopedia-titanica.org/all-the-horros-seem-to-happen-at-night.html

Regards,

Inger
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Hey Inger.

I got that piece of information and one of the photos i never seen before, and the information i never knew about it Thanks you.
Inger, Did james ever had a girlfriend before he died.I found out that he was single during the time he sailed on the Titanic.
At the time of he's death was he still u know a V.
I'm to imbarassed to type it.like did he ever have plessure with a women before he died?
I'm aksing you cause, I read you're profile and you sound like a real expert. Cheers! Aly j
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Expert Inger's taking her time replying - I wonder why ...
happy.gif

I don't know the answer, nor particularly want to, but I would observe two things. Firstly, he was a sailor. Secondly, he was an Edwardian sailor, and not likely to have written home about it.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Hi Monica,I want to know everything about him.He's my fav.
The internet has got very liminated resources about him.
Monica,when you say he was a sailor,what do you mean by that.
I understand you're second point him not telling his famliy, that's a good point there.
Thanks Monica Cheers.
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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Hallo Monica and Alyson -

What Monica is driving at is that, given the social milieu of his career, it is entirely possible that he had at least one intimate encounter with a woman in spite of the fact that he was not married (phew - I feel positively Edwardian myself in tiptoeing euphemistically around the subject in that phrase!). Sailors lived for long periods of time removed from close familial and romantic relationships with loved ones, and at the time could spend months at sea without contact with the opposite sex (unless you were on a passenger vessel, and even there intimate fraternization was prohibited - a rule that was often flouted). When they arrived in a distant port, many of these men had the money that they had been unable to spend at sea and a profound desire to have a good time - which often included the company of women.

However, we have no direct evidence that he had a sexual relationship with anyone - as Monica points out, it is unlikely that he would have written about such things to his female relatives (and I've certainly never read anything in his correspondence that points to such an encounter), and his letters to his brothers have largely not survived. So the short answer is - we don't know, and are unlikely to ever know.

He did have a sweetheart, and as far as I know the relationship was still current when the Titanic sailed. He seemed to regard it as serious enough that he was considering the possibility that she was "the one".
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Hi Inger,
I'm wondering if he would even have written to his brothers about it. If they were younger, I'm fairly sure he would not, and if they were older it might be inviting censure and urging of extreme caution. He might, I suppose, have written -
"Had a good time in Valpairiso last week ... don't tell Mother!"
But it doesn't seem that likely. My own father, in the 1930s, felt it incumbent upon him at 21 to rein in the exploits of his younger brother (only 17!) but he eventually realised this was a totally lost cause and gave up... So brothers took their family responsibilities seriously then.

Am I right in thinking that it would probably be more difficult for an officer to go on a toot in port, than for a non-commissioned sailor?

Dammit, I'm getting interested in this now! I wonder what happened to his sweetheart.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Hey ms-Inger and ms-Monica.
A sweetheart Wow. When James sign on to the titanic, he sign in the log book Single.Never of thought he had a sweet heart cause he sign on as being single and he seemed to be very shy in front of ladies, he even thought him self as being ugly and he never wanted ladies to see is photograghs. But since you ladies are experts,i'll go with you're information.
Sorry monica for bringing up James moody's s*x life, i do want to know everything. I'm with you, i'm very interested about he's sweet heart.
Is there any chance of getting more information from you ladies about james moody.I have found out so much about him cause of you two Ladies.
Cheers-Aly J
 

Inger Sheil

Member
Dec 3, 2000
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You could have a point there, Monica - it's difficult to ascertain just how much he would have related to his brothers, and in particular the one to which he was particularly close. I've read some very intimate examples of correspondence between male Edwardian siblings and friends, but without specific examples of their correspondence it's hard to say just how confiding he would have been on such intimate details. He doesn't seem to have been forthcoming at all with his female relatives about his girlfriend, but he did confide in his brother.

On some other details - such as the state of his ingrown toenail and the condition of his teeth - he was more than happy to regale his sister with the gory details...but then, she was a nurse.

One thing he did mention about the South American ports is that he didn't find the women particularly preposessing...but then, he also mentioned that one of the old South American hands was absolutely convinced that Moody would find a local girl, marry and settle down out there, as others had done before (including a merchant officer friend that Moody particularly admired).

The crew sign on sheets do not refer to marital status, Alysoun - you're thinking of the summary info on the bio pages here, which refer to marital status. This is not indicative of whether or not that had a relationship, only whether they were married. Lowe, for example, is also listed as single, although he was engaged when the Titanic sailed to the woman he married a year later.

I don't really have much to add about Moody's girlfriend at this stage - indeed, there's not too much more I know, beyond her name and her father's occupation. I don't know what became of her, unfortunately.

I don't think he was particularly shy, Alysoun - he was a bit bashful as a child when all his female relatives teased him, but if I were surrounded by a grandmother, aunts and cousins all making fun of me, I might be a bit bashful too! He had a rather self-deprecating sense of humour about his photographs, but that's part of his charm - I don't think he was too serious in asking relatives not showing them to anyone. He may have been self-conscious about his looks - it is noteworthy that he had problems with his teeth, and does not expose them in any photos (unlike his shipmate, Harold Lowe, who can often be seen grinning widely). On the other hand, we know he carried on conversations with female passengers on the South American run, and had a laugh at his own expense when he slipped the odd accidental expletive in with his patchy Spanish.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Ms Inger,Wow alot of info i never knew about. I always wounded why he never smiled.I thought he was not smily cause men wern't aloud to smile in front of the camera,but i was wrong.
James got picked on by his female ralitives, i had no idea.
Inger, how did you find out about his teeth?
Inger, did james ride horses back in those days,cars were just invented and i think only the fathers drove cars, so i'm guessing he would of owned his own horses?
thanks again for this information, much appreciated.
 
Jan 28, 2003
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Cars had been around a while, but weren't yet available in cheaper production models, and were bought by the wealthy rather than most fathers. My guess is that the young Moody would have travelled by train, tram and foot. Unless he was from a country family, he wouldn't have had a horse.

Society was perhaps a bit more 'modern' than you think, Aly, in those days. Try looking at it from the perspective that if James had lived, he might have died as late as 1988 - that's 20 years ago. If you have anyone in your family who is in their late 80s now, then you have a living bridge to the 1920s and 1930s, which is when James would have been in his 40s.

One should always talk at great length to the really old ones in the family. It's not something that the very young think to do, but that's a mistake. I didn't talk enough to my grandmothers, but when they died I realised that they had been born when women were still wearing crinolines (for goodness' sake), had grown up in long skirts with horses and carts, thought the first cars were outrageously fast, watched the development of planes but thought airships were safer, lived through two world wars, sighed in ecstasy over central heating, seen Concorde, watched men on the moon, got very enthusiastic about the Sony Walkman, and listened to their grandchildren explaining computers. Makes our 'information revolution' seem a bit puny by comparison.
 

Inger Sheil

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Dec 3, 2000
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Monica is right, Alyson - there's not much mention of horseriding in Moody's letters. It's mostly trains and foot. He lived in Scarborough and Grimsby and sailed out of ports like Liverpool and Southampton - which were all very well served by train. At the time the rail network was far more developed than it is now - with the rise of cars as transport, many of the smaller stations and lines have closed completely. Back then, there were more stops and more frequent trains.

I know of at least one instance when he used a bike to get around in port - he cycled out with a fellow shipmate to Netley Abbey, not long before he was transferred to the Titanic. I don't know if he owned the bike or had borrowed or rented it, but it seems a handy way to get around.

There's a possibility he knew how to ride - for brief time in his childhood he lived in a rather rural area near Scarborough, and he might have travelled out of town earlier to learn - but he never really talks about riding at all, and his parents didn't have the wherewithal when he was growing up to keep their own carriage. He went to the Conway when he was 14, so there wasn't too much time to learn after that - he was at sea. Lightoller did learn to ride when he was young, however, and I can't entirely discount the possibility that Moody may have as well...but he was essentially an urban lad.

Some of the Titanic's crew never did learn how to drive - Harold Lowe was one of them. He had his own boats for trips up river and short hops along the coast, there were coasting steamers, and otherwise there were trains and trams.

Moody wrote about his "rotten teeth" in his letters - at one point he needed to have several either "stopped" (filled) or, he feared, removed entirely. Poor dental hygeine was a problem for sailors at the time, often caused by inadequate nutrition. I'm sure it didn't help that Moody had a weakness for sweets, sweet biscuits ("cookies", Americans would call them) and fruit - particularly the latter, which is high is sugar and acid.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
Hi ladies,
Monica,yes true.
Yes i did think of the early 1900's not being mordern,but you proofed me wrong. thank you.

Inger,I really thought james owned horses, boy i was wrong!

So james only had the same problems as we do, like holes in our teeth. I got holes and feelings and that does not stop me from smiling. How come that stops him from smiling in his photographs?
I'm sorry,urman what does it mean?

I'm going to give you ladies a brake,i won't ask any questions for a while,it's not fair on you ladies! Cheers.
 

Shea Sweeney

Member
Apr 1, 2007
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I was wondering this an perhaps Ms. Sheil could answer it since I know she is a great source of knowledge.

Mentioned in this post above was James Moody's tight knit relationship with his brothers.

But were his parents still alive at the time of the sinking and his death at sea? Though it may seem morbid, I hope they were not. That would be most depressing outliving your children under those circumstances.
 
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Alyson Jones

Guest
His mother died when he was (13)if i remember correctly,his dad was still alive when the disarter happend.