John Hugo Ross

Hi everyone,
Im not sure exactly why im here but I have a little story to tell and wonder if it rings a bell with anyone. Last Sunday (6th Nov) I had a dream that I was walking through a dockyard looking at the ships, then all of a sudden I was on board a ship and talking to a guy who told me his name was John Hugo Ross and he went down with the Titanic. The next minute I was waking up and his name had stuck in my head so I checked up on the passenger list and found him. I was able to describe to my husband what he was wearing in the dream and when I looked at his pic he was wearing the same clothes. I dont know why he contacted me but I havent the faintest idea how to find out about any relatives he might have. I wondered if anyone on here had a relative of this name.
 

Sax angy

Member
Hi everyone,
Im not sure exactly why im here but I have a little story to tell and wonder if it rings a bell with anyone. Last Sunday (6th Nov) I had a dream that I was walking through a dockyard looking at the ships, then all of a sudden I was on board a ship and talking to a guy who told me his name was John Hugo Ross and he went down with the Titanic. The next minute I was waking up and his name had stuck in my head so I checked up on the passenger list and found him. I was able to describe to my husband what he was wearing in the dream and when I looked at his pic he was wearing the same clothes. I dont know why he contacted me but I havent the faintest idea how to find out about any relatives he might have. I wondered if anyone on here had a relative of this name.
Ciao, io sono una sua parente da parte di suo padre
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
The only thing that I found odd on John Ross' ET bio is the comment that he "presumably drowned in bed". I believe that is based on the fact that Major Peuchen was rebuffed when he tried to alert Ross about the danger. Reportedly, Ross told Peuchen "It'll take more than an iceberg to get me off this ship" and went back to bed and was not seen after that.

One has to assume that Peuchen's warning was in the first hour after the collision, during which time many others were equally unconvinced. Peuchen himself got off the Titanic on Lifeboat #6, launched at 01:10 am and the ship sank at 02:20 am. Ross occupied cabin A-10, which was just around the corner from all the commotion around Lifeboat #4 after it was lowered to A-deck. Is it likely that he would have slept through all that activity?
 

Thomas Krom

Member
I personally believe it is more likely that his two good friends Thompson Beattie and Thomas Francis McCaffry made him aware of the situation. According to Peuchen they moved to A-6 and A-8 to be nearer to their friend since he wasn't feeling too well. We know with certainty that both Beattie and McCaffry were on the boat deck near the final plunge.
 

Arun Vajpey

Member
According to Peuchen they moved to A-6 and A-8 to be nearer to their friend since he wasn't feeling too well.
I know that Ross had dysentry at the start of the trip and had to be helped into his cabin. But was he sick for the next 4 days as well? I checked a few books and there is no report of anyone seeing him in the First Class public rooms but that does not mean he wasn't there.

I would have thought if he was still under the weather on Sunday, his friends would have persuaded him to get into an early lifeboat.

Does anyone know the source of the claim mentioned here on ET about Ross rebuffing Peuchen and getting back to bed after the latter tried to warn him? Peuchen testified at the American Inquiry and while he mentioned that he was acquainted with John Hugo Ross, the testimony did not mention that encounter.


Senator SMITH.
Do you know any other passengers on A deck than those you have named?

Maj. PEUCHEN.
Yes, several.

Senator SMITH.
Who?

Maj. PEUCHEN.
Mr. Hugo Ross.

Senator SMITH.
Give his address, if you can.

Maj. PEUCHEN.
Mr. Hugo Ross, of Winnipeg; Mr. Beatty [Beattie], of Winnipeg; Mr. McCaffrey, of Vancouver.

Senator SMITH.
Do you know whether they survived?

Maj. PEUCHEN.
No, sir; they were all lost, sir. I hardly got back in the grand staircase - I probably waited around there 10 minutes more - when I saw the ladies and gentlemen all coming in off of the deck looking very serious, and I caught up to Mr. Beatty, and I said, "What is the matter?" He said, "Why the order is for lifebelts and boats." I could not believe it at first, it seemed so sudden. I said, "Will you tell Mr. Ross?" He said, "Yes; I will go and see Mr. Ross." I then went to my cabin and changed as quickly as I could from evening dress to heavy clothes. As soon as I got my overcoat on I got my life preserver and I came out of my cabin.


The above statements suggest - like you said - that it was probably Beattie who tried to warn and help Ross; that in turn suggests that the latter had not yet fully recovered. That might have been one of the reasons Ross was reluctant to get out of bed.

I personally believe it is more likely that his two good friends Thompson Beattie and Thomas Francis McCaffry made him aware of the situation.
It is believed that both Beattie and McCaffry were in the crowd around Collapsible A just before the final plunge. Beattie managed to get into the lifeboat at some stage but died due to exposure; not sure what happened to McCaffry.
 

Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
Member
But was he sick for the next 4 days as well?
My understanding is that he was. It is a very painful, serious condition and can last for ten days. If left untreated, the prognosis varies with the individual and the severity of the disease.

Does anyone know the source of the claim mentioned here on ET about Ross rebuffing Peuchen and getting back to bed after the latter tried to warn him?
Yes, Alan Hustak in his book "Titanic: The Canadian Story", but he does not provide his sources and has been very elusive. The claim can also be found in Hugh Brewster's book "Gilded Age, Fatal Voyage", but even then he credits Hustak.

I personally believe it is more likely that his two good friends Thompson Beattie and Thomas Francis McCaffry made him aware of the situation.
History is not based on personal beliefs, only facts. And Beattie's first name was Thomson, not Thompson. As I discuss in my book, Beattie asked Peuchen while they were both on the Grand Staircase at approximately 12:15 a.m. to go and inform Ross of the situation, which Peuchen did for a second time. McCaffry was last seen by Peuchen in the Smoking Room. McCaffry did not make it into Collapsible A, after Beattie climbed in. It is very plausible that just like Sixth Officer James Moody and First Officer William Murdoch, McCaffry was also washed clear of the ship.
 

Thomas Krom

Member
History is not based on personal beliefs, only facts.
I am most certainly aware of that. It was purely speculation nor did I ever claimed it to be factual. At the time it was purely speculation on my part based on the fact that the three were good friends of one another. By the way, Peuchen wasn't the only survivor who spoke to Ross that fateful night, the other being William Sloper who mentioned the following :
"We all took off for our staterooms to carry out the captain’s instructions. Returning for the second time to my warm, brightly lighted cabin where my room steward before dinner had laid out on the other bed my dinner suit and dress shirt. I got my life preserver down out of the overhead rack still not believing I wouldn't soon return to the room to go to bed. As I passed through the door to rejoin my friends, Hugo Ross called out to know what was the matter. After trying to reassure him that I didn't think the ship was in serious difficulties, I left to rejoin my bridge companions."
The stateroom of Mr. Sloper is debated to have been A-6, A-8, A-10 or A-12 by Daniel Klistorner. Mr. Klistorner personally believes that Mr. Ross moved from A-10 to A-12 the last time I spoke to him about the stateroom occupancy in first class.

Regarding Mr. Ross his fate I never intended to say that he made it up to the boat deck or anything on the likes of that. I only speculated that I personally believe it is quite likely based on Mr. Beattie and Mr. McCaffry close friendship to Mr. Ross, as well as having their stateroom near their friend, that they could potentially spoken to him during the sinking.
And Beattie's first name was Thomson, not Thompson.
I am terribly sorry if I wrote Mr. Beattie his sure-name wrong, that's my full responsibility. I didn't meant anything with it.


I hope I can make up for this misunderstanding by gifting you a rare photograph of the three friends together in Egypt as published in Manitoba Free Press on the 19th of April 1912.
1639077670565.png


I hope there's no hard feeling between us and once again, I am terribly sorry.
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
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Member
I am most certainly aware of that. It was purely speculation nor did I ever claimed it to be factual. At the time it was purely speculation on my part based on the fact that the three were good friends of one another.
No worries and I understand your reasoning for the speculation. However, we can and should only go by the facts that are presented to us.

I only speculated that I personally believe it is quite likely based on Mr. Beattie and Mr. McCaffry close friendship to Mr. Ross, as well as having their stateroom near their friend, that they could potentially spoken to him during the sinking.
I know that Beattie and McCaffry checked in on Ross in the days leading up to the sinking. While it is possible and certainly not out of the question that they did look in on Ross on the 14th, I have yet to see anything that they did. Thanks for posting the quote by Henry Sloper; I completely forgot that he spoke to Ross briefly.

I am terribly sorry if I wrote Mr. Beattie his sure-name wrong, that's my full responsibility. I didn't meant anything with it.
It's quite alright. :)

I hope I can make up for this misunderstanding by gifting you a rare photograph of the three friends together in Egypt as published in Manitoba Free Press on the 19th of April 1912.
Absolutely and thank you for sharing this rare photo, as I have never seen it! I've added it to my collection, for my own personal use. Would you mind e-mailing this to Phil Hind the webmaster at [email protected] to include it in Ross', Beattie's and McCaffry's biographies respectively? It would be a great contribution to the site.

I hope there's no hard feeling between us and once again, I am terribly sorry.
No certainly not! It's all good, Thomas. Seasons greetings and all good tidings to you, during this Christmas time.

Best regards,
Jason :)
 
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Thomas Krom

Member
No worries and I understand your reasoning for the speculation. However, we can and should only go by the facts that are presented to us.
I fully agree.
Absolutely and thank you for sharing this rare photo, as I have never seen it! I've added it to my collection, for my own personal use. Would you mind e-mailing this to Phil Hind the webmaster at [email protected] to include it in Ross', Beattie's and McCaffry's biographies respectively? It would be a great contribution to the site.
I'll send it later. I got a whole heap of rare photographs of different first class passengers as well which are unseen by most. I would gladly donate some of them if possible. I am sadly a bit preoccupied with some of my personal affairs, the last four months have been very unkind.
No certainly not! It's all good, Thomas. Seasons greetings and all good tidings to you, during this Christmas time.
You too and thank you. Let us hope that times will be kinder to us all.
 
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Jason D. Tiller

Staff member
Moderator
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I'll send it later. I got a whole heap of rare photographs of different first class passengers as well which are unseen by most. I would gladly donate some of them if possible. I am sadly a bit preoccupied with some of my personal affairs, the last four months have been very unkind.
Sounds good. I would enjoy seeing your collection. Sorry to hear that the last few months have been unkind to you.

You too and thank you. Let us hope that times will be kinder to us all.
You're welcome and thanks. Indeed, let's hope so.

Best wishes,
Jason
 
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