John Hugo Ross

Hi all,

I remember hearing there was a, I think 1st class passenger, who was feeling ill the night of the sinking. I think I remember reading he was roused out of his cabin,and asked to put on his life belt. However, he didn't believe he was in danger, and went back to bed, dying in the sinking. Does anyone know his name?

Thanks,

Matt
 
Good day to you Mr. Tekaucic,

The man in question was John Hugo Ross, a first class passenger from Winnipeg, Canada who was traveling together with his two pals Thomson Beattie and Thomas Francis McCaffry. Mr. Ross was brought on-board the Titanic in Southampton on a stretcher according to William Thompson Sloper since he was ill with dysentery. On the Cave list (a first class passenger list recovered on the body of first class saloon steward Hebert Cave) Mr. Ross is indicated as being in A-10 with his friend initially being together in C-6, however Major Arthur Godfrey Peuchen mentioned Ross being in A-12 with Mr. Beattie and Mr. McCaffry being in A-8 and other nearby staterooms (one of them was most likely in A-8). It is possible Mr. Ross was moved to an outboard stateroom to have some fresh air in his stateroom. The earlier mentioned Mr. Sloper, if Mr. Ross moved from A-10 to A-12, that he was in A-10.

During the sinking Major Arthur Peuchen mentioned the following during his account at the American Senate inquiry:
It looked like shell ice, soft ice. But you could see it quite plainly along the bow of the boat. I stood on deck for a few minutes, talking to other friends, and then I went to see my friend, Mr. Hugo Ross, to tell him that it was not serious; that we had only struck an iceberg.
Major Peuchen later asked Mr. Ross his friends:
I hardly got back in the grand staircase - I probably waited around there 10 minutes more - when I saw the ladies and gentlemen all coming in off of the deck looking very serious, and I caught up to Mr. Beatty, and I said, "What is the matter?" He said, "Why the order is for lifebelts and boats." I could not believe it at first, it seemed so sudden. I said, "Will you tell Mr. Ross?" He said, "Yes; I will go and see Mr. Ross."
There is an account, which I still need to trace, that states Mr. Ross said to Major Peuchen as he retired for the night:
"Is that all? It will take more than an iceberg to get me off this ship."
I'm sure my good friend, who is the number one historian on Major Peuchen, Jason Tiller will know from which account it comes. I look very much forward to his biographical book on him.

In his 1948 autobiography “The life and times of Andrew Jackson Sloper, 1849-1933” (which was a book on his faster, William Sloper told the following:
I got my life preserver down out of the overhead rack still not believing I wouldn't soon return to the room to go to bed. As I passed through the door to rejoin my friends, Hugo Ross called out to know what was the matter. After trying to reassure him that I didn't think the ship was in serious difficulties, I left to rejoin my bridge companions.
HOWEVER, there is one account that supports my doubts that Mr. Beattie and Mr. McCaffry (who's bodies were both recovered) would leave their good friend behind. The three friends were friends with another first class passenger by the name of Mark Fortune, who traveled with his wife and four children. The fiancée of Ethel Flora Fortune, the oldest daughter, by the name of Charles H Allen told the New York Times on the 23rd of April 1912:
"Hugo Ross and Thompson Beattie, both from Winnipeg, refused absolutely to enter the boat and which Mrs. Fortune and her daughter escaped, and assisted in loading it with women and children until it carried more than 50 persons."
If indeed true, it shows that Mr. Ross didn't die in his stateroom.

I hope this offers some insight.

Kind regards,

Thomas
 
I'm sure my good friend, who is the number one historian on Major Peuchen, Jason Tiller will know from which account it comes. I look very much forward to his biographical book on him.
Thank you very much for your kind words, Thomas. I hope you will enjoy my book when it is finally released. I have searched high and low for an actual source, as I had a fairly recent inquiry on what Hugo Ross supposedly said to Arthur Peuchen but so far, no dice. My only source is the book "Titanic: The Canadian Story". Unfortunately it has been suggested (not just by me) that the author may have made it up. In any case, if the above statement by Ethel Fortune is true and I believe it to be, then it casts much doubt on Ross' supposed response.
 
Hi there Jason, it's Ratu here in Brisbane, Australia my friend. Just enquiring will your book be available in Bookstores in Australia.

We have a few great " Boutique style bookstores here in Brisbane so I'm hoping that I am able to purchase it here when your book has been released. Congratulations on your book and I'm looking forward to getting it to enjoy.

With kindest regards

Ratu
 
G'day Ratu,

Just enquiring will your book be available in Bookstores in Australia.
I haven't gotten that far yet. I do have a publisher but discussions on how the book will look and where it will be available, have yet to commence. The global pandemic has put everything on hold as I'm sure you're aware including the publication of my book, which is tied in with another Titanic project that I'm involved with. I hope that it will be made widely available for everyone who is interested to purchase it, including Down Under.

Congratulations on your book and I'm looking forward to getting it to enjoy.
Thank you for your support and interest, in my work.
 
Morning Jason, thanks so much for your reply and kindness. Ok my friend it's all good as we say here in Australia.

I'm sure that it's going to be a great read and insight once everything is done. Yes mate the pandemic certainly put alot of things on the back burner for everyone.

I'm sure that it will all work out for the best my friend.

Cheers

Ratu
 
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