Joseph Boxhall


Ian Bland

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Inger

I bought a map some time ago with the intention of looking for the Church and cemetary. Somehow, I have never got round to going.
I agree wholeheartedly with your comments about Scarborough - It's one of my favourite places.
I'm half way through a history of Scarborough, but no mention of any Moody's yet! Then again, I'm half way through at least six other books.
Was Moody's body recovered? I can't remember without looking and my books are all packed away because we have been altering the house.
I've been looking through some of the other messages and your name appears a lot. Are you connected with the site?
 

Inger Sheil

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G'day Ian -

Let me know when you next head up to have a look at Woodland's Cemetary and I'll dig up the exact reference location for the Moody memorial headstone. It's a lot easier to find now since the articles that appeared after I located it a couple of years ago - the trustees have, to their great credit, made sure that it is no longer overgrown. There are some moves afoot to erect another memorial to Moody in Scarborough.

Moody's body was not recovered. The headstone is actually his mother's - his name and an inscription commemorating his loss in the Titanic disaster were added later.

There's not too much on the Moody family in most of the Scarborough histories I've looked at - what fleeting references there are tend to be to James Paul Moody's grandfather, who established the Scarborough off-shoot of the family in 1845 when he moved there to serve as Town Clerk - a highly influential position he held for just over thirty years. He was originally from Grimsby, and it was there that the family was more established. I did come across some rather dry comments by the author of one local history who suggested that there may have been a conflict of interest between Moody's grandfather's position with the Council and the development interests he represented through his legal practice and business dealings. He and his associates were behind the erection of the Crown Hotel (which is still standing - I stayed there one time when I couldn't get into the Grand) and - from memory - the Grand Hotel.

I believe the most attractive legacy of this formidable Victorian figure - who, judging from photos and paintings I've seen, looked a little like his grandson but with rather grand muttonchop whiskers - is the Church of St Martin's on the Hill. He was instrumental in having this exquisite pre-Raphaelite building erected, and served as a church warden there for many years.

To Phil's eternal relief, I have no formal connection with the ET site - I just flood the messageboard with pontifications, and occasionally send Phil such vital information for the ET site as the tattoo's and chest depths for various crew members ;-)

~ Inger
 

Ian Bland

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I did some stuff on Grimsby when I was a post-graduate student researching public health. (Grimsby has a fascinating record of disease and was just about the last place in Britain to have cholera! I'll have to see what I kept and have a look for Moody references. I think I know which book you say the dry comments might be in. As I recall, the definitive history of Great Grimsby (as it should be properly known) is a very tedious book indeed. Which is a shame really, as it's a fine place in my opinion.
 

Inger Sheil

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G'day Ian - You may well have come across the name of James Moody's great-uncle Charles Moody whilst doing your health-related research into Grimsby's history. He was the prominant doctor for Grimsby for many years, and held a good many public offices - among them that of town coroner. He lived at St James House, which remained in the family after his death and was the shore address James Moody used right up to when he sailed on the Titanic. The house was fitted with an external bell that those needing Dr Moody's medical assistance could ring, day or night (the building is today unfortuantely replaced by a brick monstrosity, also called St James House). Among his patients was his brother, James Moody's grandfather, who returned to Grimsby and put himself under Charles' medical care after becoming terminally ill. James Moody, like his siblings, was left a bequest in his great uncle's will.

~ Inger
 

Ian Bland

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Yes, I am familiar with the modern St James house.
As you say, it ain't pretty! Although, I don't know how long it is since you visited, but the area around it has been changed recently in an effort to make it more attractive. If you have been recently, you should have seen it before!!!
My daughter was born in Grimsby and baptised in St James church. Small world.
 

Inger Sheil

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I must have visited it before the changes you mention - I shudder to think what it looked like if it was before them! We were staying at the St James Hotel, part of the same group of monstrosi- er - examples of recent architecture. The only relief was St James' church - tremendous to hear of your very personal connection with the church! It's a beautiful structure, which I hardly had enough of a chance to have a good look at. But during my brief visit the choir was practicing something in the background that vaguely permeated my consciousness as something familiar...until I realised that it was 'Eternal Father, Strong to Save.'
 

Ian Bland

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Not surprising that they should sing that in Grimsby. I don't know if you saw it, but in the church there is a book of remembrance which contains the details of all the ships that have been lost from the port. It gets turned over regularly to remind people of all those who have been lost. It's a big book.
 

Inger Sheil

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Unfortunately I didn't get a chance to look at the book of remembrance - it was a frustratingly brief visit, and I didn't get a proper look at half the things that were interesting! (I have vague recollections of at least one tomb effigy I wanted a better look at, and barely had time to scan the memorial plaques on the walls). It must indeed be a tragically long list of lost ships. I seem to recall that in local papers, side by side with the columns about the loss of the Titanic in April 1912, appeared stories about the search for a missing vessel and her crew from either Grimsby or Hull.
 

Ian Bland

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I should make time to look at the local press reports. Although they can't necessarily be relied upon. I had a conversation today with someone who lives across the road from the Boxhall house.(where this thread started!)
He says that several people in the road are aware of the Boxhall link. He says that he saw the current owners in the pub a couple of years ago and told them!
I bet that came as a surprise.
Research seems to suggest that Boxhall was associated with the house for some time after 1912.
 

Inger Sheil

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Hallo Ian - don't have my notes with me at work (and Kerri has a better documentation of this) but I seem to recall the Boxhall family moving to the Westbourne Ave address pre-1891. Can't think of a specific date off the top of my head. Might be totally off base here, but I also believe that we followed Captain Joseph Boxhall (J G Boxhall's father's) links with the property, which as you say above extended beyond 1912.

I bet that the current owners were fascinated with the Titanic connection! We met the landlord of the house where William Murdoch lived in Southampton (he was kind enough to give us a tour of the various bedsitters it's now divvied up into, although regretably few original features still remain), and the owners of Penrallt - Lowe's childhood home and the shore address he used up until his marriage. All were intrigued by the Titanic associations, and were very obliging about us taking interior photos.

I do hope you're successful with the heritage plaque - I'll be one of the first to make the trek to see it when it goes up.

~ Inger
 

Ian Bland

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Inger

I have sent some letters to get the ball rolling, but expect it may be some time before I hear anything. I checked, and it looks like the house in Westbourne Avenue was built in 1878, or very soon afterwards, so Boxhall Senior was probably not the first owner. I might try to find out who was, as a matter of interest. The family had certainly gone by the 1930's according to another document. This was a 'well to do' area and the family would have had servants and a good standard of living. Many people connected with shipping lived in the area along with other well educated and middle class folk.
 

Inger Sheil

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G'day Ian -

D'oh! Looks like they had the Walton St address in 1891. Last date I have for Boxhall there is in 1903. By 1905 he was at the Westbourne Ave address. Will check with the family when they think the Boxhalls moved from Westbourne Ave.

The 1891 census (Walton St) does not list any servants (unlike many of the households of several of the other officers). But as the Westbourne Ave address was that much more upmarket, you're probably right on that score.
 
L

LEO BOXHALL

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I am reading with fascination of Boxhall the person,his home in Hull and the details of his family.Up until recently I was un-aware of my namesakes role on the Titanic.My name is Leo Boxhall(58) from Melbourne,Australia.From my knowledge some Boxhalls migrated to Australia-many came to Tasmania back in the 19th century- from the UK.My grandfathers name incidentally was also a Joseph Boxhall born around the same time as the 4th Officer.Boxhall is not a common name here and i am now very intrigued,if there is any family connection.The Joseph here married a Clara Johnson and had a son who was my father called Mervyn Boxhall.If any relatives are aware of any australian connection i would love to hear from you.regards.Leo Boxhall
 

Inger Sheil

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Hallo Leo -

Relatives of Joseph Boxhall, descendents of one of his sisters, do live in Australia today. In conversations with Boxhall's family, however, a Boxhall connection with Australia prior to this has never been mentioned. I will ask at the next opportunity.

The Boxhall who sailed on the Titanic was the son of another Joseph Boxhall, who in turn was the son of a Charles Boxhall. You are correct that the 'Boxhall' spelling is comparatively uncommon (variations such as 'Boxall' are more frequent), although I have come across some individuals with the same name in Hull whose connection with the Titanic Boxhall's family is difficult to trace. Do you know if your branch of the family came from Hull or Cardiff? Would you know the name of the Boxhall who migrated to Australia?

Regards,

Inger
 
L

LEO BOXHALL

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Inger. Thanks for your prompt reply to my questions on Boxhall family connections. I will check to see where my great grand-father came from and his name,as he must have been an early settler here and a migrant from the UK.
Did all Boxhalls generally come from Hull or Cardiff?
Regards
Leo Boxhall
 

Mark Baber

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Long ago, Inger wrote:

I recall him serving on ships such as the 'Calgaric'

Look here.

For the sake of those who might stumble across this post after the eBay listing is removed, the link is to an auction of a passenger list from Calgaric's January 1931 cruise from Southampton to the Mediterranean. Boxhall is listed as first officer.
 

Inger Sheil

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Ta for that link, Mark - very useful. His voyage on the Calgaric that I had data for was another one, so this is one more to add to the list of logs/agreements to chase when I can more fully turn my attention to Boxhall's later career.
 

Mark Baber

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Congrats!

And to think that the first time I looked at it, I didn't notice who the seller was!
 

Inger Sheil

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LoL! Yah, I've just emailed him and asked if btw he was going to be at the BTS convention again this year.

Lot of Boxhall items turn up without the seller either noticing or knowing who he is - not so with Richard!
 

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