Joseph Bruce Ismay


john tracy

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May 26, 2010
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Mr. Ismay may have been considered a coward by many for boarding one of the last lifeboats to leave Titanic while over 1500 customers and employees (passengers and crew, including Captain Smith) were still aboard, but his testimony in the investigation of the tragedy was helpful in changing maritime law regarding ship safety and the number of lifeboat seats available.
 

Spencer Chew

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Jul 25, 2010
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Ismay was no longer welcomed among polite society, he was summed by people who HAD been his friends, people would talk behind his ear as he walked down the street ,"That's Ismay" his cowardisim cost him his job a chairman of the white star line
 

Cuteblonde22

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Feb 27, 2011
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Hey, this is Ashley, I was wondering if you could tell me what ever happened to bruce ismay! I was wondering and i really need to know, for a college assignment. By the way, this is really good information! I love it, you are really smart!
 

David Msantos

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May 7, 2012
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Ismay was hidden behind one of the davits holding lifeboat collapsible C. Once the officer turned away, Ismay walked inside very quietly and carefully making sure the officer doesn't sees him. Bruce Ismay listened some comments about a man in a lifeboat, but he stayed quiet most of time in the boat. After he boarded the Carpathia, Ismay sent a message to the Withe Star Line office at New York telling that his ship has sunk.
 

tammy (1421)

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Sep 30, 2012
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I think ismay was a big coward he should have been a little better of a gentleman for the ladies and the other children that was still aboard the ship, i think he should have gone down with the ship as well as mr.andrews and mr.smith along with all of the other gentleman, to me he is nothing but a piece of dirt!!!
 

Ken (1785)

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Feb 24, 2013
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Does anyone know why J Bruce Ismay traveled from New York back to Liverpool in January 1900 aboard the Oceanic?Thanks - Ken
 
Mar 17, 2018
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I am no official expert of Titanic history, but from what I have learned, I believe that Mr. Ismay was a remarkably misunderstood individual, who was slandered in the newspapers after the sinking, especially by William Randolph Hearst. Ismay was not responsible for the sinking, only for the lack of lifeboats. He is not a saint, but he certainly is not the villain movies remember him as.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Apr 21, 2009
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I was reading about First Class Steward Edward Brown just now simply because I wanted to see if there was more information about what was happening around Collapsible A when he cut the falls to release the partly swamped boat. I did not find anything new about that per se but did learn something that I did not know about a situation that Brown claimed happened earlier while he was assisting with loading and launching Collapsible C. According to Brown's account, Bruce Ismay was actually inside Collapsible C for several minutes before it was lowered, assisting surrounding women and children to board. If true, this contrasts significantly from most accounts of the White Star Chairman's survival, which depict him stepping to Collapsible C in the last moment as it was about to be lowered. Either way it probably would not make much difference to Ismay's post-disaster position, but it does offer some food for thought.
 

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