Joseph Pierre Duquemin


R

roger whittingham

Guest
hello everyone
im from jersey in the channel islands and im looking for info on my grandmothers relative who was called joseph duqemin he was 3rd class and survived the sinking escaping on collapsible D at around 2.10am (luckily for him!) i have a little info on him but not much i know he died around 1967 (i was born in 68 and have always had a curious facination with titanic)he was originally from guernsey channel islands if any one can help i would be most gratefull
thanks
 
Mar 10, 1998
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Hi Roger,
Joseph Pierre Duquemin was born in Guernsey on November 24, 1892, the son of Joseph Duquemin and Louise Quentin, also natives of Guernsey. As you said, he was a third class passenger and survived, settling for awhile in New York and later in Stamford, Connecticut. He married Marian Flanagan, a Connecticut native who was born November 14, 1900. They had a daughter who died in 1985 and a son who is still living. Joseph was a stone mason for Yale and Towne Company in Stamford and served in the 42nd Infantry, USA, in World War I. He died of a pulmonary embolism on June 1, 1950 and was buried in Spring Grove Cemetery in Darien, Connecticut. His wife died on February 25, 1979.

I hope this is what you were looking for.

Phil Gowan
 
Dec 12, 1999
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Roger and Phil,

All of the Duquemin info is correct but the real interesting tidbit is that Duquemin's relocation to Stamford, Connecticut, from Albion, New York, was influenced by Frederick Hoyt, a fellow survivor who escaped in collapsible D.

Although it has never been confirmed, Joseph Duquemin may very well have been the one to haul Mr. Hoyt into the boat from the icy water, and his actions were rewarded by the latter. The Hoyt family was prominent in Stamford, Connecticut. Of course, there also remains the possibility that the two men simply met in boat D, and became friendly with one another. Personally, I believe Duquemin was of some assistance to Hoyt and the yacht designer was obliged to offer assistance to the young man and a job was secured in Stamford.

Amazing stuff.....

Mike
 
Mar 10, 1998
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Hi Ken,
After spending some time in New York, Joseph Duquemin moved to Connecticut where he was a stone mason and also served in World War I. He married Marion Flanagan and had a son and a daughter. He was born in Port Grat, Guernsey on November 24, 1892 and died in Stamford, Connecticut on June 1, 1950 leaving his wife, a son and a daughter. His wife died in 1979, the daughter married but only outlived her mother by a few years. The son is still living.

Regards,
Phillip
 

Arne Mjåland

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Oct 21, 2001
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25 May 1991 there was an article in Guernsey Press about Joseph Duquemin jr, son of Joseph on the Titanic. He visited his uncle Gerald in Guernsey at that time. There is a picture of those two together in the paper. The granddoughter Deborah was also with them.
According to the article Gerald had still pieces of the lifeboat jacket from Joseph senior worn on the Titanic.
At that time Joseph jr. ran a icecream frenchise in Westport, best known as home of film stars then
 

Arne Mjåland

Member
Oct 21, 2001
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Mr Duquemin jr. pronounced his name Doo-quem-inn.
He was in the US navy and was onboard the carrier Wasp when it collided with another ship with a loss of 240 lives. I had a letter from a Guernsey woman relative in May 2000. She told me that Joseph jr. still was alive then, but according to her, it was useless to write to him, as he never answered letters.
The obituary about Joseph senior was in a Stamford newspaper the same day he died. 6.1.50.
"Joseph on Thursday. Beloved husband of Marion Flanagan.
Funeral service was at Leo P. Gallagher Funeral home, 20 Suburban Ave on Saturday morning June 3 at 11 a.m."
 

ian Hough

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Dec 17, 2002
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Hi folks - Happy new year to all!!!

Sorry to resurrect an old thread but looking for info on Mr Joseph Pierre Duquemin
His Bio reads: Both his legs were amputated and he died sometime prior to 1967 in Guernsey???????

Yet buried in Spring Grove Cemetery in Darien, Connecticut.
anyone wish to help me understand

All the best
Hough
mad.gif
 
Mar 10, 1998
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Houghie,
That information is quite wrong. He died in Connecticut as stated and is buried with his wife Marion Flanagan Duquemin in Spring Grove Cemetery and still has family there.

Phil
 
Apr 27, 2003
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Houghie,
Please read below to expand on the above - its quite a tragic story.
DUQUEMIN, MR. JOSEPH. Saved in Lifeboat D. Porgros, St. Sampsons, Guernsey, Channel Islands. UK.
(Died January 1950)
(From A Stamford Connecticut, News cutting dated Thursday 6th January 1950).
Joseph Duquemin of 47 Tormuck La., a veteran of World Ward I, died this morning at Stamford Hospital after a lingering illness.
Born in England on November 24th 1892 Mr. Duquemin was a resident of Stamford, for 24 years. he was formerly employed at the Yale and Towne Mfg. Co.. He served in the supply company of the 42nd Infantry during World War I.
Surviving are his wife, Mrs. Mary Flanagan Duquemin; two daughters, Mrs. Robert Knappe and Mrs. Frank Merrily and a son, Joseph Duquemin, all of Stafford. In addition, his mother, four sisters and two brothers survive in Guernsey, England.
Funeral service will be held at 11 am Saturday from the Leo P. Gallagher Funeral Home.. Interment will be in the veterans Plot at Spring Grove, Cemetery. Darlen.
(From The Emergency and Relief booklet by the American Red Cross, 1913).
No. 128. (English). Paving cutter, 24 years old. ($50).
Accompanied by Mr. H. Williams.
(From Guernsey Evening Press, April/May 1912)
Occupation Quarryman.
Going to Albion, New York.
Jersey address: Vale.
Later served in the British Army. Lost both legs. Said to be through to exposure.
c/o Porgos, St. Sampson, Guernsey.
Mr. J. Duquemin
Reported Saved.
News was received at noon today of the safety of Mr. Joseph Duquemin.
Mr. Joseph Duquemin, of Portgrat, Vale, a quarryman, aged about 30. He accompanied Mr. Williams, one of the supposed victims of the disaster. Mr. Duquemin had been employed as a quarryman at Messrs Manuelle and Co's quarry at the Vardes.
The new of his safety was conveyed in a message from the White Star Line at Southampton, thus:
''Joseph Duquemin officially reported saved''.
The news was received by Mr. Duquemin's parents.
20th April 1912
Mr. J. Duquemin.
The relations of Mr. Joseph Duquemin, reported to be one of the survivors of the Titanic Disaster, have not yet heard from him direct, but yesterday a letter was received from the White Star line's Southampton Office, confirming the telegram sent on the 20th of April with respect to the safety of Mr. Duquemin.
2nd May 1912
Mr. Joseph Duquemin
A letter was received this morning by the father of Mr. Joseph Duquemin, who was a passenger on the Titanic. He states that he has been in hospital and on his recovery proceeded to his destination, Albany, New York, where he has arrived quite well. He has promised to give details of his rescue in his next letter.
Bert's friend Joseph Duquemin, was doing his best to help the women and children. At one point he took off his overcoat and wrapped it round a shivering seven-year-old-girl. Both of them Denbuoy and Duquemin, worked together until they were waist deep in water. By that time all the boats had left.
Finally Joseph Duquemin turned to his friend and said 'I'm off'. He swam away from the deck and headed for the last lifeboat but Bert Denbuoy hesitated. When he started to follow, the suction from the sinking ship dragged him under. For months afterwards Joseph had nightmares. Time and again he reheard his friend crying out as the current pulled him to his death.
Eventually Joseph reached the lifeboat. At first he was refused permission to board and it was only after he told the seamen that he could pull an oar as well as they could that they dragged him to safety.
He joined the oarsmen in their battle to pull the crowded boat away from the suction of the sinking ship.
He also helped someone else out of the icy water. Hearing a cry for help, Joseph hoisted another swimmer aboard. The rest of the passengers were so angry that they threatened to throw them both back in the sea. The man he had saved turned out to be one of the Jersey Crew members, Walter Williams.
Account from Gerald Duquemin.
His brother, Gerald, of Capelle's Building Stores, Guernsey, takes up the story: ''I was only ten years old at the time the Titanic went down but I can remember very well what results the sinking brought home. We heard about it on the 15th or 16th of April but there was no news of my brother. I remember my mother was so shocked and worried we had to have the doctor - he used to come on horseback - and confined my mother to bed. We all waited for news. Mother said she had a feeling Joseph was all right but as time went by, we began to fear the worst.''
''Then on April 20th - my mother's birthday - Mr. Veal of the Vale Post Office arrived in father's building yard. Mr. Veal came himself with the telegram. He wouldn't send one of the boys. I remember my father coming towards the house with the telegram in his hands. They were shaking so much he couldn't read the words. He called to my sister to read them out. There were only five words. 'Joseph Duquemin reported safe, Ismay''.'
Gerald Duquemin still has the envelope in which the telegram arrived; the message itself is in the hands of Joseph's widow in America.
In later life Joseph Duquemin suffered cruelly. He complained of pains in his legs and had to have first the right one and then the left one amputated, leaving him a sick man. This fatal injury stemmed from the tragic night of April 15th, 1912.
Years later there was a sequel to the tragic story of the Titanic. A Beaconsfield Justice of the Peace (J.P.), Miss Eva Hart, came on holiday to Guernsey and visited the Duquemins. She came to tell them about the night Joseph had handed her his overcoat when she stood shivering on the deck of the Titanic as a girl of seven and she came to say 'thank-you' to his family.

Best regards

Brian J. Ticehurst - Southampton UK
 

Arun Vajpey

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Jul 8, 1999
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Eventually Joseph reached the lifeboat. At first he was refused permission to board and it was only after he told the seamen that he could pull an oar as well as they could that they dragged him to safety.
He joined the oarsmen in their battle to pull the crowded boat away from the suction of the sinking ship.
He also helped someone else out of the icy water. Hearing a cry for help, Joseph hoisted another swimmer aboard. The rest of the passengers were so angry that they threatened to throw them both back in the sea. The man he had saved turned out to be one of the Jersey Crew members, Walter Williams.
Joseph Duquemin was rescued on Collapsible D. I always thought that the man he pulled out of the sea was Frederick Hoyt. Neither man was on board that lifeboat when it was lowered into the water. Then Woolner and Stefasson leapt in from A deck just as the boat came past. Subsequently, two swimmers reached the lifeboat, the first one initially refused entry but hauled on board when he reportedly offered to help with the rowing. That fits in with Duquemin's testimony and he also claimed to have helped to pull in another swimmer. AFAIK, the only other swimmer to reach Collapsible D was Fred Hoyt.

Walter Williams was rescued on Lifeboat #13 on the starboard side.

Also, Hoyt reportedly later helped Duquemin to get a job in Stamford, Connecticut. Duquemin's original destination was Albion, New York. The two men, one a Jersey stonemason travelling in Third Class and the other a wealthy New England sportsman could not have known each other till the Collapsible D situation.
 

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