Just one more question

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George, I just had a look at Cameron's shooting script. The directions refer to 'Ruth's suite' and 'Rose and Cal's suite'. Also, in the Southampton scene, Cal (who is described as 'rich beyond meaning') boasts that "I've pulled every string I could to book us on the grandest ship in history, in her most luxurious suites". The implication of that is that Cal has booked BOTH promenade suites, one for Ruth and the other for himself and Rose. Unrealistic, but I guess that's the answer you were looking for.
 
Thanks Bob! But isn't that a bit too much? Three suites for only three people and their servants? But Cameron surely knows better for his movie! A little too unrealistic but certainly true enough for a movie!
 
Two suites, George - with Rose and Cal sharing one of them. Not an acceptable arrangement in 1912, but makes perfect sense for a Hollywood plot! The servants' rooms just down the corridor were (I think) included in the price of the promenade suites - one per suite. Lovejoy would have had one of these and the two maids (for Rose and Ruth) could have shared another.
 
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