Lady Cynthia Asquith


Apr 26, 2005
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I recently read in a book another version of the first class passenger list. I came to the name: “Lady Cynthia Asquith”￾. I also checked on Et and I was not able to find that name, even in the second or third class passenger lists. I would like to have more informations concerning this mysterious lady. Thanks,

Charles
 

Mike Herbold

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Feb 13, 2001
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Charles:
Lady Asquith was quite a celebrity, and it was big news when she appeared at the British Inquiry when Lady Duff Gordon was called as a witness. There's a good description of it in LDG's ET bio. I didn'y know this before -- just punched in 'asquith' in the search box on the main page.
Once you try that, the next question is, was Lady Asquith related to Raymond Asquith? I don't know.
Mike
 
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Jeffrey Kern (Jeffrey)

Guest
Mrs Asquith was the wife of the then British Prime Minister, Herbert Henry Asquith (12 September 1852-15 February 1928), and indeed, Mrs Asquith was at the Titanic Inquiry in England to watch Lucy, Lady Duff Gordon at the stand, as was Miss Ismay, Bruce Ismay's sister, and a few other matrons of society. If you would like more information on the British Prime Minister (who succeeded, in 1908, Henry Campbell Bannerman, and resigned in favour of his war secretary, David Lloyd George, in December 1916), I would be most obliged to offer information from a formidable source, and thus I implore you to please contact me.

I hope what I have presented is of use to your question.
 
Apr 26, 2005
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Mike, Jeffrey: Thanks for the informations. The name Asquith, I didn't remember that I've read it in the transcriptions of the Inquiry, but I was not able to put the finger on it. When I read this name “Lady Cynthia Asquith”￾, included in the first class passenger list, I was rather confused. I was even more when I saw this quote from her in my book: “It must be admitted that a very large fraction of our time was spent in dressing and undressing. We were forever changing our clothes, a custom that necessitated traveling with a mountain of luggage.”￾

I got the impression that Mrs Asquith was on board... Thanks again. Sincerely,

Charles
 
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Daniel Rosenshine (Danielr)

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Hey Charles,

I believe you are quoting "Last dinner on the Titanic." The Asquith quote is there to give an impression of what it was like for ladies in those days to travel and to dress for dinner. She certainly was not on Titanic.

She is mentioned in Lady DG's memoirs in chapter 15. Also if you check out the Lady DG site you found, there will be a further mention of her there, whe the author of the site talks about the inquiry.

Daniel.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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The story of Lady Cynthia Asquith being on board may come from a "bandwagon" book called "Titanic: Fortune and Fate" published in 1998. This book had some interesting pictures of Titanic relics but is full of basic errors. If you already know your facts pretty well it's worth a look but I can't recommend it to Titanic new chums.
 
Apr 26, 2005
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My information on Lady Asquith come indeed from “Titanic: Fortune & Fate”￾, where I read her quote.

Daniel: I didn't say she was on the Titanic. The author included her name in the passenger list by error. Her quote is next to Mrs. Cardeza's in the book so it's a confusing way for people who have just basic knowledge about the Titanic.

Dave: I don't agree with you. “Fortune & Fate”￾ is a very good book. There are many archive documents, letters from passengers and some artifacts. The photographs are wonderful. One of the only error I saw is concerning Lady Cynthia Asquith. I commissioned it from Amazon.com and I'm very happy to have buy it. Sincerely,

Charles
 

Lou Kerr

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Feb 6, 2010
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RE: Lady Cynthia Asquith

Cynthia Asquith (1887 - 1960) was the sister of Raymond Asquith (killed in action 1916) and daughter of Henry Herbert Asquith and his first wife. Prime Minister Asquith married his second wife, Margot Tennant, in 1894. Asquith was not raised to the peerage until 1925 (1st Earl of Oxford and Asquith) so in April, 1912, Cynthia would have been referred to as Miss Asquith. Not until 1925, as the daughter of an Earl, would she be known as Lady Cynthia.

Hope you all find this helpful,

Lou Kerr
Cincinnati OH USA
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Here at last is what we Aussies call the dinkum oil on that confusing and quite irrelevant (to Titanic) person, Lady Cynthia Asquith. I hope this will put the record straight.

She was born Cynthia Mary Evelyn Charteris in 1887. Her father later became the 11th Earl of Wemyss. In 1910 she married the second son of the British Prime Minister, Herbert Asquith. The son was also named Herbert. WW I left her husband in poor health and she supported her family by writing and by working as secretary to J. M. Barrie.

She wrote numerous books for children, articles for The Times and assembled several anthologies of ghost stories as well as writing some of her own. She also wrote biographies of Barrie and others, adult novels and books of memoirs. She died in 1960.

Her memories of WW I were published posthumously in 1968 and are considered her most important work.

In the absence of Debrett’s I can’t say whether her title derives from her father’s earldom or whether it's because her husband was knighted. Probably it's the former.

She was not a Titanic passenger and was probably not at the British enquiry. Lady Lucille Duff-Gordon states in her memoirs that the Mrs Asquith who attended was Margot Asquith, the Prime Minister’s second wife.

There is a biography by Nicola Beauman, published in 1987 but otherwise it is not easy to find material about her. The above is from The Feminist Companion to Literature in English.
 

Lou Kerr

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Feb 6, 2010
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Hi Dave, Thanks for correcting the misinformation I provided. WhatI wrote was from a website biography of the Prime Minister. Sorry to have passed along something so far off the mark. If she is properly called Lady Cynthia Asquith then her style derives from her father's peerage. As the wife of a knight she would be properly be referred to as Lady Asquith.

Lou
 
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Peter vd Heuvel

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Raymond Asquith (Lt. Grenadier Guards) was severly wounded on 15 sept. 1916 at the attack on Guillemont (Somme) Being brought to the rear he died on the stretcher. He is buried at Guillemont road cemetery (Somme)
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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Just to wrap up the Asquith story.

Raymond Asquith was the heir to his father's title and would have been the 2nd Earl of Oxford, had he lived. He left an infant son named Julian, who became next in line of succession and duly became the Earl of Oxford and Asquith. I think he's still alive.

As L Kerr pointed out, Lady Asquith's title derives purely from her father.
 

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