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sashka pozzetti

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thank you for more interesting information.you are so modest, I found the colour picture on a web site, and it said it was yours! black white grey and taupe are what fashion designers wear today. Can I find the press cuttings and letters on-line. I want to read what Lucile was actually thinking.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Yes, I've recently been looking at that unfinished de Laszlo of Lucy. It went under the hammer at Christie's not so long ago - such a charming work, albeit a rough one, was worth (in my opinion) much more than it actually fetched. Rough it may be - but there is still a very palpable sense of the sitter's character. And I love the little dogs too. I actually had a copy pinned above my desk for a time.

I know the de Laszlos of Elinor Glyn, although they are a bit pedestrian in my view. Then again, de Laszlo was a very pedestrian painter, lacking the brio and verve of Sargent or Boldini. Which is why he was such a successful artist among the more conservative members of English Society. The Christie's show, back in 2004, was thronged with very elderly, well-heeled ladies in Barbours and pearls, reminiscing about their mothers and aunts who were featured in the works on display. Their presence (and the rooms were positively heaving) may not have enhanced my aesthetic appreciation of the pictures but did at least bring them alive for me, so to speak.
 
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Sashka: No, I don't own anything original relating to the de Laszlo, only a color copy of an old proof that was rather torn and cracked.

Martin:
Your mentioning about Christie's and your work there has reminded me that you and I were in contact some time ago. You are Martin S. Williams? I recall we exchanged a few letters about Lucile and our mutual acquaintance Meredith Etherington Smith. I think you were at Cambridge then? By the way, I interviewed Meredith for Hilary Magazine about 2 years ago; I think the article is still online. You might find it interesting. She is an absolute hoot! The behind the scenes story of that interview is that I was terribly late getting to her flat, because of a flight delay. I was horror struck because she is not the sort of gal you keep waiting! On top of that, my bags had been left in Paris so I had no fresh clothes to change into and didn't have the time to buy new ones, so I showed up in her garden where we talked looking like a rumpled homeless person. She looked at me as though she were seeing double -- the only thing 'designer' on me were my shoes and thank God for that!Anyway it turned out to be a fun talk and she was completely charming.

You and others have brought up some interesting topics on other threads and I will try to chime in later in the week when I have some extra time. I have been very busy lately and have not posted much here in quite a while. But it is not true that I am "no longer a member" of ET or "no longer posting to ET" as someone told me they had heard. I have been asked by friends of this site to share info on my presentation on Lucile at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston on March 15, which was really the first time I have talked publicly (or rather in person) about my project, and I have not forgotten my promise to do so. It's just finding the time! There were, by the way, several ET members there -- Grant Woolacott and Shelley Dziedzic. It was nice to see them. Anyway, just popping out now for a late supper, after being boring for far too long about all this here, so will chat later.

Randy
 
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sashka pozzetti

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Well I landed up in the right place here!!! a lecturer in Lucile, and an expert from the top Auctioneers. God Bless the web!!. I do hope you could take a look at some of the questions I asked, Randy as you know so much. I know a l ittle bit, because I have read your friend's book, the It Girls, Discretions and Indiscretions and lots of fashion books, but I haven't had any proper training in fashion history and need some help.
 
Mar 20, 2007
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Hi Randy

Yes, it has been well over three years but we did exchange a couple of emails about Lucile back then - and I've been eagerly following those debates on ET that particularly interest me in the intervening period, although I literally only got around to joining last week (and have already posted more than my fair share!) I'd just graduated from university (the other one - not Cambridge!) when last we were in touch and I was about to start a six-month internship at Christie's - where I ended up staying until December '06. I did encounter Meredith Etherington-Smith occasionally, although our offices weren't close together.

Now, with time temporarily on my hands, I'm taking the opportunity to raise, or pursue, some questions here that I've had in my head for a long while. I'll be littering the various threads devoted to Society, fashion, art and the lifestyles of the first-class passengers with my thoughts and will always be thrilled to receive the input of fellow members.

All the best

M
 
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sashka pozzetti

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I don't know what the other university was, but I didn't go to university at all!!!, which is why the web is so great for getting information. I am always at home, but that doesn't mean I don't learn a lot. The web has changed everything for people like me.
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Aug 20, 2000
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Is someone could be able to provide me the famous article published in the London "Daily News" on April 19, 1912, written by Abraham Merritt in the first person relating the sinking' story of Lucy Duff-Gordon, please ?

For those who do not know anything about that, here's briefly the story : As soon as the Carpathia arrived at New-York, Lady and Lord Duff-Gordon went to supper with some friends, which included Abraham Merritt, reporter of the "New-York American". She told her story and when he came to his place, Merritt called Lady Duff-Gordon and said "Mr Hurst from the "Daily News" just telephoned me, and he wants your statement about Titanic for tomorrow morning. Can I write the story just the same as you have told me?", She said "All right!" and the story has been published on April 19, 1912 and written from the point of view of Lady Duff-Gordon, like she had written it herself.

After that, Lady Duff-Gordon always denied to have participated to that article or even to have been consulted. That is what she said at the Commission. But we know now that she lied upon this article for her Memoirs and some private letters contained some of the facts reported by the article (I'm not the author of those facts, for I've read it in "Alaistair Walker, "Four Thousand Lives Lost the Inquiries of Lord Mersey into the sinking of the Titanic, the Empress of Ireland The Falaba and the Lusitania".)

If someone has that article of April 19, 1912, please tell me that would be so appreciated! Thank you very much!
 
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Aaron_2016

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On a related note. The Iowa newspaper Daily Gate City reported the Duff-Gordons had both drowned in the disaster.


Duff_Gordons.png



Note - Survivor Frank Prentice also believed their boat had tipped over when it was lowered and the occupants were spilt into the water. There must have been a cry or shout from the lifeboat as one end was lowered faster than the other, and when the people on the boat deck overheard the commotion, the rumours began to spread that the boat had tipped over. Perhaps this rumour was one of the reasons why the passengers refused to get into a lifeboat? They thought it was too dangerous to leave the ship after hearing the Duff-Gordon's boat had tipped over?


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Rob Lawes

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Jun 13, 2012
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That article is bizarre. Given that Charles Stengel was actually saved in Emergency boat 1 with the Duff-Gordans he couldn't have possibly seen them tossed into the water.
 

Mark Baber

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Jul 4, 2000
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There were lots of articles published right after the sinking, even supposed survivors' eyewitness accounts, that are not consistent with reality. That's why, IMHO, they should be taken with large grains of salt.
 
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Aaron_2016

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That article is bizarre. Given that Charles Stengel was actually saved in Emergency boat 1 with the Duff-Gordans he couldn't have possibly seen them tossed into the water.

Newspapers always make mistakes with names and sources. There was a lengthy story about Hichens but the article kept referring to him as Quartermaster Moody. Easily done as the survivors were surrounded by reporters who no doubt barked out questions over the noise, and names got muddled up. If several of the survivors were interviewed in a group then the reporters might get their wires crossed. e.g. The survivor who said the Duff Gordon's had perished when their boat tipped over was likely not Major Peuchen. He probably included the Major's name when mentioning the occupants of the boat and the reporter mistakenly thought that was his name. Same thing with Hichens. He probably told the reporter he was the man in charge of the wheel and he took orders from Moody. The reporter then scribbled down all of the notes he needed for the article and in the confusion he attributed the story to Quartermaster Moody, the man in charge. These mistakes still happen today. We recently held a ceremony to the sinking of the Princess Victoria. Our local newspaper made several spelling mistakes and showed the wrong ship in the photo. The reporters at the dock were likely under far more pressure to get the story in before anyone else. There were even reports that Captain Smith had survived.



Smith1a.png


Smith2.png



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Hello everyone, thank you very much for information. Nitschke, a special thanks!
It was a big mess in papers on days following the disaster. In fact, I was wondering yesterday, while reading the excellent book "On a Sea Of Glass", when reporters got a proper methodology to write their articles... I'll get the answer when I'll have time -- have some people who could give me the information in journalism at University of Montreal and will ask them if the Titanic's case is taught to enhance journalism' studies. I can provide you answers as soon as I'll have them if you all are interested.

Captain Smith alive... hum... Really rubbish!! I've read something there is few years ago. I've read it rapidly and don't know If I understood it well, but the whole matters was something like Captain Smith had survived until our days, living on an ice floe! And you have people who seem to believe it, as it should have make sense!... At any rate, human being is weird sometimes!

The only place where Smith and Murdoch survived, it is in the novel I'm writing : Downtown Montreal 1933, 2 men -- John and William Smith -- are killed in an apartment. Detectives are called upon but have to request the help of Scotland Yard while inquiry unfold : both men are British and detectives try to unravel what seems to be a world wide conspiracy links with the Titanic' case. Who killed John and William ? Why ? What part played the two men in that conspiracy not foreign to the soon coming World War I ?
That is it, for now.

Thanks for help once again, everyone! :)
 

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