Largescale functioning Titanic replica


Ryan Thompson

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Somebody built a 1:20 scale model of the Graf Spee battleship. It has an engine and can be ridden in like a motorboat. Does anybody know if this has ever been done but with a Titanic design? With a Titanic version, I imagine a hatch on the top, and the forward-facing windows of the model would be the windows the driver looks out of. On that note, I'd make all the windows from the bow and stern decks upward functioning -- any passenger(s) inside would be able to view outward through them, and even though would be small there would be lots of them, creating a screen door effect of sorts.

Also, how large could somebody build something like this before getting stopped by maritime law? A 1:10 functioning model would be 88 feet, 2 inches long and 9 feet, 2 inches wide. You could probably stretch the width a bit and get away with it. :p
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>Also, how large could somebody build something like this before getting stopped by maritime law?<<

Once you start carrying people for any reason and in any numbers, the law steps in and never goes away. Even if only a small model operated by a single man (For which there is barely room), if the operator is aboard, it would still have to satisfy any existing regulations for small boats that exist in whatever jurisdiction it's being operated.

If your craft is large enough to carry passengers and has that as a specific purpose, any laws that apply to passenger vessels begin to apply to whatever it is you've built.

The bottom line is: You never get away from the law unless all you're putting together is a modest bathtrub toy.
 

Ryan Thompson

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Then I'd have to work with the law. I've seen yachts in books and on the internet that were 88 feet long or larger, some were sailing yachts, others were just motorized.

The largest Titanic models I've seen were at least 12 feet long -- I can't tell how long exactly because only part of the model was in the photo. I'm thinking of the model shown in the National Geographic issue on the discovery of the wreck. Two survivors are photographed sitting next to a large model of the ship and several artifacts. A life vest is shown.

Out of curiosity...what were the life vests made out of? I've read early vests contained blocks of cork.
 

Dave Gittins

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Apr 11, 2001
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On Titanic the lifebelts were made of blocks of cork, enclosed in a coarse linen cloth. Each lifebelt had twelve blocks. Standards were set by the Board of Trade. For instance, the use of granulated cork was forbidden.
 
W

Wayne Keen

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Probably completely worthless semi-related observation:

I remember MANY years ago seeing oil tanker captains being trained in scale models of tankers - they were somewhere in the range of 10 - 15 feet long...I haven't seen anything about that sort of thing in a very long time though...

Wayne
 

Paul Lee

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Aug 11, 2003
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Ryan, I believe that the model you refer to was the builder's model, currently in the Liverpool Maritime Museum.
 

Dave Gittins

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The trouble with Titanic is her narrow beam. You'll notice that the model on the web site is accurate only in profile. Her beam is way over scale.

I think a thirtieth scale working model could be made. In round figures, that's about 30' x 3', with a draft of a bit more than one foot. The ballast and stability would have to be sorted out, or you might end up doing the Eskimo roll.

Such a craft would be legal to tow where I live. On the water, it would have to carry prescribed equipment, but if it was used close inshore or on rivers and lakes the rules are not too hard to meet. A concealed anchor might require some cunning.

As long as no paying passengers are carried, you can do all sorts of things. The craft would rank as a yacht and we all know that these can be rather weird. A scale Titanic would be tame compared with a Volvo 70 or an Aussie 18' skiff.
 

james taylor

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Hi i,m new to the site but am a very keen titanic enthusiast. it is quite clearly impossible and rediculous to consider raising a large pile of scrap metal from 2.5 miles under the sea, as well as it is a grave yard. people should really just forget raising her.
My idea is, if enough money could be raised from donaters and various millionares why not build an exact working replica of the ship and i mean down to every detail, there are plenty of plans for the ship and i know the technology of the time has long gone but it would still be possible for people to learn the old ways.
It could then actually be used as a ship for historical cruises for people who were interested and when not being used, she would be a museum.
just an idea of mine that ive always thought could work. what do you think??

[Moderator's note: This post, originally posted in a separate thread in another topic, has been moved to the pre-existing discussion on the same subject. JDT]
 

Jason D. Tiller

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Hello James,

Welcome aboard. Your idea was proposed right after the movie's release, in 1998. There has been a lot of discussion on this over the years here and basically, it won't happen. Way too many issues are involved, such as safety regulations and financial costs just to name a couple. Ideas have been put on paper, but we have not seen one piece of material laid down in a shipyard.

You might want to read through this thread and the other ones in this topic, to get a better understanding of why it won't ever come to fruition.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>what do you think?? <<

Won't happen.

It's that simple.

Any replica which would meet current legal standards for safety would be only a poor reflection of the Real McCoy, and the Real McCoy could never be built and legally operated.
 
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I have a newspaper photograph of a working scaled down model of the Titanic. It was taken in California around 1998. It was much larger than the one Ryan posted.
 

james taylor

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Yes i did think about the legal issues, but if a legal document could be drawn were by all passengers and crew boarding the replica had to sign an agreement that they do so at there own risk. there would probably have to be some modern navigation equipment on board but only the bare minimum and the ship would mainly be a museum just for people to view, i know there are many issues but it would be a really amazing thing to happen.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>...but if a legal document could be drawn were by all passengers and crew boarding the replica had to sign an agreement that they do so at there own risk.<<

In a lot of respects, modern day passengers do so with modern day vessels under the same understanding. They have more legal protections now, but you're still gambling. In any event, you can't just trump the law with a waiver of liability. The ship, built to 1912 standards exactly to plan would not meet modern day SOLAS standards, and if a ship doesn't meet those standards, it doesn't go into trade with passengers or cargo.

It's really just that simple.

It's a moot point in a lot of other respects as well since the Titanic literally could not be duplicated without an enormous expenditure which would be unacceptable today. Riveted hulls just aren't built these days, and the people with the high degree of skill and experience needed to do such work are few in number. Most are now pushing up tombstones.

The engineering plant?

Forget it.

Nobody stokes coal these days and the conditions in such an environment are literally illegal. Occupational health and safety laws would put a cold stop to the idea before it ever got anywhere. Even if they weren't, your chances of finding anyone willing to work in such conditions is effectively zero.

I could go on for quite some time about this it's been done to death. Any notions of building a relplica of the vessel fit squarely into the realm of fantasy. Not reality.
 

Matthew Lips

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Mar 8, 2001
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I don't mean to be rude, but I wonder how many of Michael's 11 649 posts have been dedicated to debunking the possibility of a Titanic. I guess it would be a neck-and-neck race with the number of times he has had to debunk the ship-switch theory!

The patience of a saint you have, Mr Standart!
 
Judging by Michael Standart's other posts, Matthew, and his repeated statements that he knows a great deal about ships from his experience...I would be inclined to believe what he says when he's talking about regulations and costs and such. He's been there. He knows. His arguments on both the possibility of a Titanic 2 and the possibility of the Titanic/Olypmic switch are all logical and informed.

Maybe they could build a replica of the Titanic on land and use it as a hotel/museum. But it's clear that times have changed. (Also, is there a large enough market for people to want to sail on a replica of a ship that famously sank with a great loss of life...I'd certainly think twice).

Regarding the ship switch theory, Michael's not the only one that has argued against it with logic and actual facts. I don't see the other side doing it. It's stated on paper in plans and photographs that the Olympic and Titanic were similar but not identical. Why continue to bring it up? It's obvious that the inventors and perpetrators of such theories are merely trying to either A) get their name in the papers or B) search for some sort of explanation for the tragedy.

So, lay off Michael. He's one of the true voices of reason on this board and his posts are ALWAYS informed, logical and appreciated by me and many others.
 
Dec 2, 2000
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>>So, lay off Michael.<<

Actually, Matthew was agreeing with me.
wink.gif


This isn't the first time we've fenced with either the Titanic replica proposal or that rediculous ship-switch thing. Several of us have been dealing with it for years. It keeps coming back with the near inevitability of an unloved season, so my bet is that it won't be the last.

On the matter of the ship switch thing, if you want to understand the mentality of the people who champion this sort of thing, click on http://skepdic.com/illuminati.html

While that website discusses mostly political conspiracy theories, the patterns of "thinking" are exactly the same.
 

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