Late At Night


Matt Smith

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Feb 24, 1998
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What was it like at night? I know that the smoking Room closed sometime (I think 11 or 12) but the Grand Staircase lights never went off, right? Was there anything that was open all night long, such as the reception room, gymnasium, lounge or reading and writing room?

Thanks!!!
Matt
 
Nov 9, 2002
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Hey Guys,
Somewhere on this site I heard that there would be a lamp at the landings of the staircases on. The thing that I think about is wouldnt they have to change the light bulbs often because they are older light bulbs and wouldnt last as long? For the public rooms with doors; they were closed but what about the Reception room?

All The Best,
Sahand
 
Jul 7, 2002
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Matt,

The Titanic Collection, a box set of "Mementoes of the Maiden Voyage" from the archives of THS, includes a booklet of notes for first class passengers. In it I found the answers to some of your questions:

Lights were extinguished in the Dining Saloon at 11 p.m. (page 12). My guess is that the Reception room had similar hours.

The Lounge closed at 11:30 p.m. (12). This section mentions that some ships have a separate Reading Room. Presumably it would have hours similar to the Lounge.

The Smoke Room closed at 11:30 p.m. and the lights were extinguished at midnight (13).

The only hours I could find for the Gym (same hours as Turkish and Electric Baths) were when it was open for Ladies only (9 a.m.-noon), Gentlemen only (2-6 p.m.), and Children only (1-3 p.m.).

My guess is that public areas, like the Grand Staircase, would remain lit all night. Can't have millionaires falling down the stairs in the dark!
happy.gif


I hope this helps.

Best wishes,

Cathy
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Was it really cold inside the ship after the collision? i assume it must have been since heating was not top priority at the time. Did the passengers understand this and, if yes,did not they feel troubled about it? the ladies surely must have ...
George
 
Jun 4, 2003
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Hi again! My late grandfather who used to travel by ship to Canada in the forties and fifties always told me that cold even in Summer was somewhat too much inside a ship (of course he did not have the means to travel in such luxurious surroundings). Would the "experts" on the topic agree as far as the Titanic is concerned? Thanks!
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>Would the "experts" on the topic agree as far as the Titanic is concerned<<

Beats me, however, keep in mind that out on that stretch of the North Atlantic, chilly temperatures are the norm, even in the summertime. That's why they had electric heaters installed on passenger vessels of the period, and also the reason why some on the Titanic which failed to work was a cause for complaint.
 

Arun Vajpey

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Jul 8, 1999
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What were the rules about passengers walking about the ship after 'lights out'? I am assuming that First Class passengers had no restrictions but what about the Second Class passengers and 'steerage'? There must have been quite a few energetic young people in Third Class and I was wondering if they had opportunities for 'nightly adventures' during the crossing?
 
Jul 9, 2000
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>>What were the rules about passengers walking about the ship after 'lights out'?<<

None as far as I'm aware. Passengers were pretty much left to their own devices once they were aboard, but with all the public spaces either closed or unstaffed, there would be little point to being up and about.
 
A

Aaron_2016

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There was also the time zone difference to consider. Most of the passengers were used to European time zones and would become more tired and harder to stay up late as the ship moved closer to the American time zone. e.g. Night time in the USA would be almost breakfast time in Europe.

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Arun Vajpey

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. Passengers were pretty much left to their own devices once they were aboard, but with all the public spaces either closed or unstaffed, there would be little point to being up and about.
Well, if public spaces were accessible and unstaffed, some energetic youngsters might have considered them ideal for nocturnal hanky panky. I know there would be time zone differences etc but the way I think about the situation, life must have been hard for most steerage passengers wherever they came from. During a transatlantic crossing they would have had little to do between meals and opportunities to meet others of their kind with little or no chaperoning.
 
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Aaron_2016

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I wonder how many pregnant women gave birth on the Titanic? Do we have any records of mothers going into labour on the Titanic or in the lifeboats, or aboard the Carpathia?


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Jul 9, 2000
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>>Well, if public spaces were accessible and unstaffed, some energetic youngsters might have considered them ideal for nocturnal hanky panky.<<

No, not really. The problem with the public spaces is that they were extremely public. people tend look for privacy when they want to "Do The Deed."

>>" I wonder how many pregnant women gave birth on the Titanic? Do we have any records of mother's going into labour on the Titanic or in the lifeboats, or aboard the Carpathia?"

Nope. Not even one.
 
Nov 14, 2005
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I wonder how many pregnant women gave birth on the Titanic? Do we have any records of mother's going into labour on the Titanic or in the lifeboats, or aboard the Carpathia?


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Like Mr. Standart stated I have never heard of any women giving birth on Titanic or the Carpathia. The only story I know of about babies is the famous "Titanic Baby" where 2 women claimed to be the mom and it was sorted out on the Carpathia with the rightful mom getting her baby back. But on an off topic subject the movie the "Legend of 1900" kinda deals with a baby being born on an ocean liner. Its fiction but quite entertaining. In case you haven't seen it.
 

Arun Vajpey

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The scene in ANTR when the young man knocks a stateroom door just before the collision rings true..
That might have been a nod to Sam Etches report that there was a couple in a stateroom who would not open the doors when he knocked. It probably was B-76 or B-78; one of them was occuoied by the Spencer couple and the other one was where Etches could not get access.
 

Scott Mills

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There was also the time zone difference to consider. Most of the passengers were used to European time zones and would become more tired and harder to stay up late as the ship moved closer to the American time zone. e.g. Night time in the USA would be almost breakfast time in Europe.

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Except the ship moved both ways across the Atlantic, so what if you were a first class passenger on Titanic's Eastbound return trip where the clock was moving in the other direction?
 

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